Larceny and Old Lace

  • Title: Larceny and Old Lace
  • Author: Tamar Myers
  • ISBN: 9780380782390
  • Page: 340
  • Format: Paperback
  • Larceny and Old Lace For Whom The Bell Pulls Tolls As owner of the Den of Antiquity recently divorced but never bitter Abigail Timberlake is accustomed to delving into the past searching for losttreasures and navigatin
    For Whom The Bell Pulls Tolls As owner of the Den of Antiquity, recently divorced but never bitter Abigail Timberlake is accustomed to delving into the past, searching for losttreasures, and navigating the cutthroat world of rival dealers at flea marketsand auctions Still, she never thought she d be putting her expertise in mayhemand detection to other use until crotFor Whom The Bell Pulls Tolls As owner of the Den of Antiquity, recently divorced but never bitter Abigail Timberlake is accustomed to delving into the past, searching for losttreasures, and navigating the cutthroat world of rival dealers at flea marketsand auctions Still, she never thought she d be putting her expertise in mayhemand detection to other use until crotchety junque dealer, Abby s aunt Eulonia Wiggins, was found murdered Although Abigail is puzzled by the instrument of death an exquisite antiquebell pull that Aunt Eulonia never would have had the taste to aquire she s willing to let the authorities find the culprit But now, Auntie s priceless lace is missing,and somebody s threatened Abby s most priceless possession her son, Charlie.It s up to Abby to put the murderer on the block.

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      Posted by:Tamar Myers
      Published :2020-01-14T02:05:36+00:00

    About Tamar Myers


    1. Tamar Myers was born and raised in the Belgian Congo now just the Congo Her parents were missionaries to a tribe which, at that time, were known as headhunters and used human skulls for drinking cups Hers was the first white family ever to peacefully coexist with the tribe, and Tamar grew up fluent in the local trade language Because of her pale blue eyes, Tamar s nickname was Ugly Eyes.Tamar grew up eating elephant, hippopotamus and even monkey She attended a boarding school that was two days away by truck, and sometimes it was necessary to wade through crocodile infested waters to reach it Other dangers she encountered as a child were cobras, deadly green mambas, and the voracious armies of driver ants that ate every animal and human that didn t get out of their way.In 1960 the Congo, which had been a Belgian colony, became an independent nation There followed a period of retribution for heinous crimes committed against the Congolese by the Belgians in which many Whites were killed Tamar and her family fled the Congo, but returned a year later By then a number of civil wars were raging, and the family s residence was often in the line of fire In 1964, after living through three years of war, the family returned to the United States permanently.Tamar was sixteen when her family settled in America, and she immediately underwent severe culture shock She didn t know how to dial a telephone, cross a street at a stoplight, or use a vending machine She lucked out, however, by meeting her husband, Jeffrey, on her first day in an American high school They literally bumped heads while he was leaving, and she entering, the Civics classroom.Tamar now calls Charlotte, NC home She lives with her husband, plus a Basenji dog named Pagan, a Bengal cat named Nkashama, and an orange tabby rescue cat named Dumpster Boy She and her husband are of the Jewish faith, the animals are not.Tamar enjoys gardening she is a Master Gardner , bonsai, travel, painting and, of course, reading She loves Thai and Indian food, and antique jewelry She plans to visit Machu Pichu in the near future.Series Pennsylvania Dutch Mystery Den of Antiquity Mystery


    535 Comments


    1. I just can't like a protagonist who has her cat declawed and calls everyone 'dear' (especially if she's going to then get all riled by other people calling her by diminuitives). Abigail is also really bitter and snarky, but never quite manages to grab hold of "funny" and isn't even in the same time zone as "self aware". Mostly though it's the cat declawing thing. Gosh.P.S. I've read a few Southern themed cozy series and this is the only one that's ever managed a level of vitriol towards "the Nor [...]

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    2. I love Tamar Myers' humor and this start of another series is chock full. Quotes:Chapter 19 (great church humor and neat insertion of herself in the story!): I should have known. In Rock Hill you can live your entire life and have it populated solely by the Episcopal church. Want to speak to a teacher? We have tons of those. How about a college professor? Would half the congregation please step forward . At the Episcopal Church of Our Savior we even have a crazy woman mystery writer with frizzed [...]

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    3. I couldn't resist a series whose titles are puns of classic movie titles. It's just too cute. The first book in the series was cute, and a quick read. I don't think I will be continuing on to book two though. It just wasn't enough to really hook me. It's a little sad actually, I was looking forward to The Cane Mutiny (#13) and The Glass is Always Greener (#16), but I know I won't be able to hang in there for that long.

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    4. I collected a little Tamar Myers and finally dug in, along with introductions to several series. I seize bargains and see how I like them; years after gathering whole suites! This comedic treatise of close-knit, American southerners isn’t what I expected of a lady born in the Congo! Additionally, I’ve tired of the ‘cozy mystery’; driven by comedic antics and quaint settings, instead of a good, suspenseful mystery. But I have to say, I liked it. A fast-paced adventure with elements of fea [...]

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    5. This is the first book in the Den of Antiquity series by Tamar Myers. The story is fairly entertaining and the mystery is filled with suspects. But I have to say that it's filled with a dialogue that aims to be a witty banter, but really just falls flat. Every character seems to be stereotypically exaggerated and every conversation seems forced and fake. It was a quick read, but not overly engaging. This story was one of the depicted books in the Featured Author - Nov 2011 - Tamar Myers page at [...]

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    6. Usually I like cozies. this is the first one by Tamar Myers I've read. It follows the formula for a traditional cozyte title, fairly bloodless murder that has a puzzle to be solved and oddball characters in amusing situations. Unfortunately pieces to the puzzle really aren't given to us. and the oddball characters are largely unlikable. Worse, the heroine is also unlikable. She over reacts to things. She lies when it is totally unnecessary. She calls everyone "dear" and then complains when someo [...]

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    7. Sooo, I liked the overall setup of this story, so will stick with it another book or two to see how she develops her characters. The "whodunit" felt a little out in left field and rather like an "oh crap, I'm almost to the end of the storytelling, I'd best start wrapping this up pronto" scramble by the author. To me, the characters felt borderline Stephanie Plum silly with very little basis in reality, but I guess that's why this is called "Fiction", no? Fairly fluffy timepasser. Which I appear [...]

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    8. Although I never really warmed up to Abigail I did enjoy this book. I found her too caustic in her comments. I realize she was still dealing with bitter feelings about her divorce but she seemed unable to make comments to anyone without some degree of sarcasm. I enjoyed the mystery surrounding the murder, the red herring misdirections, and the quirky characters. I'll read the next book in the series just to see if Abby becomes less harsh now that there's a love interest in her life.

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    9. Love the spirited heroined her interesting way that she always gets pulled into a mystery. She has quirky family and friends who give humor to the pages so that you enjoy reading every book in her series.

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    10. I tried Myers' books based on reviews from the back of other mysteries that I had liked--I find that a good way to find new authors. This time I was disappointed. Sure, her characters are quirky but not funny. The mystery was just so-so. Not a series I'll go back to.

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    11. This was my first book by this author. I enjoyed the setting, although the humor took some getting used to. I will read on in this series.

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    12. I hate the main character. I just can't stand her.

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    13. I absolutely hated the main character.

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    14. Don't waste your time with this one. The protagonist is too flippant and the other characters are one-dimensional.

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    15. I keep trying books by this author because I want to like them, but I just don't. I'm not exactly sure why they bother me so much, but it's more than the main characters attitude or cussing. Sad.

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    16. This book is really difficult for me to rate. I found it kind of stupid (I know that's not a word we're supposed to use, but I can't think of a better one.) Some of the characters were really too weird to be believable. Some of the dialog was just stupid. Having said all of that, however, I laughed a lot at this book. Maybe because it was so stupid it was funny? I absolutely didn't see the end coming and that made it exciting. The mystery was right up front; yet there was a lot else going on [...]

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    17. I like the first book in Myers’ other series, and expected to like this one as well, since it is set in a city that I know fairly well. Unfortunately, my expectation was woefully incorrect. I just could not like this book. Abagail was horribly irritating to me, sarcastic and hateful too much of the time. And the other characters were equally annoying, with the exception of Greg, who seems like a genuinely nice guy and one who needs to distance himself for Abagail. I think the fact that too man [...]

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    18. Abigail Timberlake, proprietor of the antiques shop Den of Antiquity is a diminutive woman in her mid-forties. When her aunt is murdered Abigail becomes an amateur sleuth to find out who killed Aunt Eulonia. Abigail is sometimes like a mean rat terrier and sometimes a sympathetic character; her sharp tongue almost gets her killed. Oddly enough she catches the eye of the handsome detective investigating her aunt's murder. Lots of southernisms abound through the book and a couple were laugh out lo [...]

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    19. I liked the humor in this booke author has a some good ideas and great character development. I love Abigail and find her character refreshing. I honestly would rate this hos book a 3.5 but figure a 5 star rating is ok too. Loved the plot keeping you guessing on The Who done it. I think I'm gonna enjoy reading about Abigail's kids in this series and more than likely the ex husband. Good start to a series.

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    20. Of course, it was the hypocritical "Christian" who was the killer. I'm so over the offensive use of make-believe Christians as the murderer.

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    21. Having the word DEAR in just about every sentence and conversation just about drove me batty but overall it was OK.

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    22. When Eulonia Wiggins is found strangled by a 19th century bell pull, her niece Abigail Timberlake knows something is odd. As the owner of the Den of Antiquity, Abigail knows antiques. And Abigail knows Eulonia didn't have the taste to acquire such a handsome antique. Eulonia's own antique store tended towards tacky garage sale cast-offs. But when investigations discover Eulonia's lace collection has disappeared, and Abigail starts receiving threats against her son's life, Abigail decides she mus [...]

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    23. This novel falls into the category of "Cozy Mystery", which translates to amateur detectives (usually female), lots of quirky characters, humor, and "murder most foul". They are usually centered around the main character's choice of profession or talent, or skill. In this instance, Abigail Timberlake is a forty-six year old, divorced mother of two who owns and operates an antique store in a small town in South Carolina.Abbi Timberlake is a diminutive (4'9" tall) beauty with a decidedly spunky pe [...]

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    24. Light reading novel based on antique dealers."As owner of the Den of Antiquity, recently divorced(but never bitter!) Abigail Timberlake is accustomed to delving into the past, searching for lost treasures, and navigating the cutthroat world of rival dealers at flea markets and auctions. Still, she never thought she'd be putting her expertise in mayhem and detection to other use -- until crotchety "junque" dealer, Abby's aunt Eulonia Wiggins, was found murdered!Although Abigail is puzzled by the [...]

      Reply

    25. As owner of the Den of Antiquity, recently divorced(but never bitter!) Abigail Timberlake is accustomed to delving into the past, searching for losttreasures, and navigating the cutthroat world of rival dealers at flea marketsand auctions. Still, she never thought she'd be putting her expertise in mayhemand detection to other use -- until crotchety "junque" dealer, Abby's aunt Eulonia Wiggins, was found murdered!Although Abigail is puzzled by the instrument of death -- an exquisite antiquebell p [...]

      Reply

    26. Had to laugh at a line in this book. Yankees are visiting the Carolinas and during a visit to Denny's, a Southern lady made a sarcastic remark to a dumb question. The Northern lady said something along the lines of going back home where people are more polite. It made me snort in laughter. Everybody knows that the South is way more polite than the North! Southerners make just as many rude, sarcastic remarks, but they do it so politely, you almost don't know you're being insulted.I've finished th [...]

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    27. I liked it at first but then it just started to seem trashy, and I got bored halfway through. (And trashy has its place, don't get me wrong. Until the halfway point I was going to say that this would be fine airport/plane reading.) The author clearly did a lot of research but her use of it eventually seemed like caricature. She didn't quite get the girls raised in the South feeling right, even as a thing to poke fun of.There was no author biography in this book, but I looked it up; the author is [...]

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    28. Found multiple grammar and spelling errors throughout, a problem which is a turn-off for me as a general rule. Here is a smattering of examples: all and all instead of all in all; not adverse to instead of not averse to; put the petal to the metal instead of put the pedal to the metal; and many, many more. It really interfered with my enjoyment of the book. I will give the second in the series a chance as there were several passages that had me laughing out loud. She's still adding installments [...]

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    29. #1 in the Den of Antiquity series. This series is quite different from author Myers other long running series, the Pennsylvania Dutch series. This 1996 debut features up-to-date Abigail Timberlake, a Charlotte, NC, divorced mother of adult children.Den of Antiquity series - Abigail Timberlake owns an antique shop on Selwyn Ave, Charlotte. Her aunt Eulonia, who also owns a shop is choked to death with an antique bellpull from yet a third shop. Abigail, who is attracted to the detective assigned t [...]

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    30. I'm being a little generous and giving this 3 stars instead of 2.5. There's nothing deep about this book and it is entertaining and cute. I thought Abigail, the main character, went a little overboard with her frequent references to being short. As usual in Tamar Myers' books, there is a lot of humor. This series isn't everyone's cup of tea, but I do enjoy a quick, light read every now and then.

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