An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

  • Title: An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith
  • Author: John of Damascus
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 441
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith Saint John of Damascus Arabic Yu ann Al Demashqi Greek I ann s Damask nos Latin Iohannes Damascenus also known as John Damascene Chrysorrhoas streaming with gold i e the golden speaker c Decem
    Saint John of Damascus Arabic Yu ann Al Demashqi Greek I ann s Damask nos Latin Iohannes Damascenus also known as John Damascene, Chrysorrhoas, streaming with gold i.e the golden speaker c 676 4 December 749 was an Arab Christian monk and priest Born and raised in Damascus, he died at his monastery, Mar Saba,Saint John of Damascus Arabic Yu ann Al Demashqi Greek I ann s Damask nos Latin Iohannes Damascenus also known as John Damascene, Chrysorrhoas, streaming with gold i.e the golden speaker c 676 4 December 749 was an Arab Christian monk and priest Born and raised in Damascus, he died at his monastery, Mar Saba, near Jerusalem.A polymath whose fields of interest and contribution included law, theology, philosophy, and music, before being ordained, he served as a Chief Administrator to the Muslim caliph of Damascus, wrote works expounding the Christian faith, and composed hymns which are still in everyday use in Eastern Christian monasteries throughout the world The Catholic Church regards him as a Doctor of the Church, often referred to as the Doctor of the Assumption due to his writings on the Assumption of Mary.

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    About John of Damascus


    1. Saint John of Damascus Arabic Yu ann Al Demashqi Greek I ann s Damask nos Latin Iohannes Damascenus also known as John Damascene, Chrysorrhoas, streaming with gold i.e the golden speaker c 676 4 December 749 was a Syrian Christian monk and priest Born and raised in Damascus, he died at his monastery, Mar Saba, near Jerusalem.A polymath whose fields of interest and contribution included law, theology, philosophy, and music, before being ordained, he served as a Chief Administrator to the Muslim caliph of Damascus, wrote works expounding the Christian faith, and composed hymns which are still in everyday use in Eastern Christian monasteries throughout the world The Catholic Church regards him as a Doctor of the Church, often referred to as the Doctor of the Assumption due to his writings on the Assumption of Mary.The most commonly used source for information on the life of John of Damascus is a work attributed to one John of Jerusalem, identified therein as the Patriarch of Jerusalem 3 It is actually an excerpted translation into Greek of an earlier Arabic text The Arabic original contains a prologue not found in most other translations that was written by an Arabic monk named Michael who relates his decision to write a biography of John of Damascus in 1084, noting that none was available in either Greek or Arabic at the time The main text that follows in the original Arabic version seems to have been written by another, even earlier author, sometime between the early 9th and late 10th centuries AD Written from a hagiographical point of view and prone to exaggeration, it is not the best historical source for his life, but is widely reproduced and considered to be of some value nonetheless The hagiographic novel Barlaam and Josaphat, traditionally attributed to John, is in fact a work of the 10th century.John was born into a prominent Arab Christian family known as Mansour Arabic Mans r, victorious one in Damascus in the 7th century AD.He was named Mansur ibn Sarjun Al Taghlibi Arabic after his grandfather Mansur, who had been responsible for the taxes of the region under the Emperor Heraclius When the region came under Arab Muslim rule in the late 7th century AD, the court at Damascus remained full of Christian civil servants, John s grandfather among them John s father, Sarjun Sergius or Ibn Mansur, went on to serve the Umayyad caliphs, supervising taxes for the entire Middle East After his father s death, John also served as a high official to the caliphate court before leaving to become a monk and adopting the monastic name John at Mar Saba, where he was ordained as a priest in 735.Until the age of 12, John apparently undertook a traditional Muslim education One of the vitae describes his father s desire for him to, learn not only the books of the Muslims, but those of the Greeks as well John grew up bilingual and bicultural, living as he did at a time of transition from Late Antiquity to Early Islam.Other sources describes his education in Damascus as having been conducted in a traditional Hellenic way, termed secular by one source and Classical Christian by another One account identifies his tutor as a monk by the name of Cosmas, who had been captured by Arabs from his home in Sicily, and for whom John s father paid a great price Under the instruction of Cosmas, who also taught John s orphan friend the future St Cosmas of Maiuma , John is said to have made great advances in music, astronomy and theology, soon rivaling Pythagoras in arithmetic and Euclid in geometry.In the early 8th century AD, iconoclasm, a movement seeking to prohibit the veneration of the icons, gained some acceptance in the Byzantine court In 726, despite the protests of St Germanus, Patriarch of Constantinople, Emperor Leo III issued his first


    625 Comments


    1. This is what John says in Book 2- Chapter 11. Concerning Paradise:For God says, Of every tree in Paradise you may freely eat. Genesis 2:16 It is, me-thinks, as if God said, Through all My creations you are to ascend to Me your creator, and of all the fruits you may pluck one, that is, Myself who art the true life: let every thing bear for you the fruit of life, and let participation in Me be the support of your own being. For in this way you will be immortal. But of the tree of the knowledge of [...]

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    2. I am going to have to come back to this later. I have an irritating electronic copy. I am not a fan of ebooks anyway, but especially ebooks with constant typos.

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    3. "De Fide Orthodoxa." One of the last Fathers of the Church, St. John Damascene writes in Byzantine Greek to an audience over a thousand years ago regarding the understanding of the Orthodox faith and the theology and practice thereof. Time is irrelevant to the life of the Church, as is seen with this beautiful work. “Evil is nothing else than absence of goodness, just as darkness also is absence of light. For goodness is the light of the mind, and, similarly, evil is the darkness of the mind. [...]

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    4. A classic. One of the best books I've read in the Orthodox Christian tradition. Spent a lot of time writing down quotes and ideas which surprised me. I would say philosophically he seems to be a neo-platonist- especially considering he both gives an cosmology argument for God existence AND says that God's Essence is still unknowable according to rational catagories. A book I'll definitely be rereading.

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    5. Damascus writes a brief summary of the faith with a centering upon Christ and especially his person and natures as God and Man in one Person.There are quite a few oddities along the way, and john is drawn here and there - sabbath, virginity, etc- but this is a great classic work of theology with a great deal for us.

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    6. I would like to give this book 4 stars, because the good bits are very good. However, the bad bits are really bad; thus it must only get 3 stars. It is a good read, though only one for the discerning.

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    7. A standard text for being introduced into Orthodox theology.

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    8. Not exactly the Eastern Summa, but still good

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