SuperBaby: 12 Ways to Give Your Child a Head Start in the First 3 Years

  • Title: SuperBaby: 12 Ways to Give Your Child a Head Start in the First 3 Years
  • Author: Jenn Berman
  • ISBN: 9781402770333
  • Page: 455
  • Format: Hardcover
  • SuperBaby Ways to Give Your Child a Head Start in the First Years The first three years of life are the most important for nurturing a child s full potential that s when they start forming attachments developing a sense of self and learning to trust During this ti
    The first three years of life are the most important for nurturing a child s full potential that s when they start forming attachments, developing a sense of self, and learning to trust During this time, there are critical windows of opportunity that parents can take advantage of if they know how In a dozen succinct yet information packed chapters, award winning columniThe first three years of life are the most important for nurturing a child s full potential that s when they start forming attachments, developing a sense of self, and learning to trust During this time, there are critical windows of opportunity that parents can take advantage of if they know how In a dozen succinct yet information packed chapters, award winning columnist and professional therapist Dr Jenn Berman gives parents the knowledge they need Her enlightening sidebars, bulleted lists, and concrete, easy to use strategies will help parents raise happy, healthy babies who grow to be flourishing toddlers and successful adults.

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      Published :2019-02-14T14:57:11+00:00

    About Jenn Berman


    1. Jenn Berman Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the SuperBaby: 12 Ways to Give Your Child a Head Start in the First 3 Years book, this is one of the most wanted Jenn Berman author readers around the world.


    925 Comments


    1. I should have read the introduction better and browsed the topics in the table of contents before I started reading this book. At first, I was going to read this book straight through and implement all "12 ways to give your child a head start in the first 3 years." I felt like I needed to do this because I have a 3 1/2 year old and a 1 year old at the time & if it was too late for my 3 1/2 yr old then my 1 year old would at least only be a year behind.The first chapter was overwhelming. It i [...]

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    2. after reading reviews on this book, it seems like I had the same experience as most readers. the author comes off as very "holier than thou" in a parental sort if way, and once you read the first chapter you feel like a failure for sitting around and enjoying your child's life. why aren't you enrolling them in preschool? went aren't you teaching them a foreign language? and heaven forbid why are you letting them watch tv while you have some coveted down time? once I got the hang of rolling my ey [...]

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    3. Engaging book that served as an excellent introduction to a variety of childcare issues. Great way to get your feet wet (but possibly less useful if you've read a lot of baby books). I found her chapter on languages anxiety-producing, but otherwise learned a lot.

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    4. I tried really hard to take this book seriously, but just couldn’t everything “Bringing up Bebe" mocks and more is preached in this book. The book starts off by saying that it won’t tell you how to create a “superbaby” and then proceeds to try to do just that. Parental anxieties about raising successful children are poked and prodded to ridiculous levels. Apparently teaching your baby a second (and possibly third) language as well as sign language by the age of 3 is a requirement. As a [...]

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    5. I liked this book. The SuperBaby title is a little misleading - it's not about applying some formula to your baby to make them some kind of genius. This book has a lot of interesting research, and not as much practical how-to. For example, it gave a lot of interesting research about the toxins in disposable diapers and listed some options (clothing diapering, EC), but didn't go through step-by-step how to apply these approaches.This book can really be read straight through - the research is real [...]

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    6. I will come clean and say that "read" is a bit of an overstatement. I skimmed this book and read parts of chapters that were more appealing to me. I don't know that anything that I skimmed was some earth shattering piece of information. My favorite chapters were "Talk the Talk" and "Different Kind of Toy Story". I completely skipped (as in did not even skim) the foreign language and signing chapters ("Talk to the Hand" and "Babies Without Borders"). I liked how the book was organized and also li [...]

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    7. While this book has some good points, there's nothing in here I haven't read before. The author is condescending and contradictory. She spends an entire chapter on how important it is to teach young children a second language and then gives "easy" methods for doing so, all of which require someone living with the child to be fluent or hiring someone who is fluent. She stresses the importance of being "green" but then dismisses cloth diapers as "gross" and assumes anyone who uses them must also b [...]

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    8. The title was off-putting to me, and the author seems to assume that the reader has a certain socioeconomic status necessitated by her suggestions (Mandarin lessons, anyone?). However there were some useful tidbits for enriching your child's environment. The section on TV viewing seemed well-researched.

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    9. this book got two stars because it it had a COUPLE good ideas other than that it was just her ideas and thoughts and feelings and I feel like they are geared to make you feel guilty if you are not the idealistic perfect parent she is.ke it was all like "this is the perfect way!" and here are all these studies to prove it whatever

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    10. If you've read any other parenting books, there's not a lot of new material in this book. It can at times be so repetitive I felt it to be condescending and some things I found to be a little extreme (for example: no tickling because it shows physical dominance over your child). But enough interesting ideas and pointers to flip through, I stopped reading it page-for-page about halfway through.

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    11. Really enjoyed this book - easy insights into the little things I can do to enhance everyday life for my little one.

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    12. Eh, I had a lot of issues with this book. The author says the word "scientist" what felt like an infinite amount of times to substantiate claims made throughout the book. There are also a lot of studies mentioned, but very little information about them is presented. For example, how many children were involved, during what years, what was their socio-economic status, how did the study account for X, Y, and Z bias, etc. Perhaps this information wouldn't fit the flow of the book (it's not an acade [...]

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    13. (Written in retrospect and may have forgotten some points) Some things were just too difficult to implement. For example removing all toxins from baby's life completely, from eating pure organic food and wearing organic cotton clothes, to making sure there are no lead in the paint of your walls. Still there are some good points, e.g encouraging bilingualism, and things that we already know, like breastfeeding, banning of screens like TV and mobile phones etc.

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    14. This is the BEST parenting guide I have read thus far. Dr. Jenn culls ideas and research from an impressive number of publications to put forth a practical and inspiring series of insights into child development and parenting. Although some of her suggestions were a little over the top (I had difficulty buying the notion that raising tri-lingual children in a home where both parents are mono-lingual is a modern day necessity), most were quite doable. I approached the chapter on sign language wit [...]

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    15. Such an unfortunate title. What was the author thinking? She even says in her introduction that her point is not to help you create some uber-baby. Instead Ms. Berman dedicates one chapter to each of ten ideas or ways to help your child start out on the right foot. None of the ideas are earth-shattering revelations, they aren't expensive (or don't need to be), and they aren't difficult. In all honesty they are pretty common sense, although my experience has been that constant bombardment by the [...]

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    16. 10/21: The introduction made me set the book down and think, "Maybe this book isn't for me." I got to: "Researchers now know that children are born with an IQ range that can vary as much as thirty points, depending upon outside factors."This is valid and fine and nine thousand percent not for me. I'm not reading this book so Maya becomes smarter, even though the title says otherwise. I'm reading it because I love the idea of creating a rich environment for my daughter, and I love culling books a [...]

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    17. As anxious pregnant woman and newbie parent, I was thrilled with the comprehensive nature of this book. Dr. Jenn gives lots of information and summaries of the parenting literature. And, I am in love with the charts, tables, and format of the book. It is a great reference book for suggested books, toys, developmental stages and parenting strategies. Dr Jenn's tone is approachable and concrete, which is very appealing.That being said, Dr Jenn takes a hard stance on the issues that are important t [...]

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    18. This book should be called Everything Can Hurt Your Baby. I started with the It's Easy to be Green chapter. Yeah right. I need to be cleaning my house with water and vinegar, apparently. All my six month old son's toys are probably toxic. The cotton in his clothes is full of pesticides. There's an anecdote from this lady who had a baby with eczema. My six-month old has it as well. This woman says she did some research and "What I discovered was shocking-everything in my home, including the produ [...]

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    19. I really enjoyed this one. I thought it was going to be gimmicky and unrealistic. With a title like Superbaby, I thought for sure it would go against how I feel about pushing kids to do too much. But, this book is not like that at all. It outlines 12 ways to give your child an advantage the first three years. A few of them I found more cumbersome than the average parent is going to be willing to try (such as teaching a second language if you don't speak one already or ridding your home of all th [...]

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    20. I think the author did a fantastic job of describing many of the ways that children learn and grow. Many of the points the author makes I already knew from college courses I have taken in the past. I feel that a lot of the previous reviewers did not really "read" the book. She brings the reader many options for parents that want to teach their children a foreign language or sign language that may not have the financial resources to hire someone to help. When it comes to TV, she says that it is n [...]

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    21. I've read and skimmed quite a few books about parenthood and babies since having my first born last spring, but this one has been my absolute favorite so far. Trust me when I say you can get lost in the shelves and become buried in an information overload. But Dr. Jenn Berman, a family and child therapist who has appeared on hundreds of shows, including Oprah, The Today Show, and CNN, manages to deliver mounds of information in palatable spoonfuls. The focus of this book is to home in on twelve [...]

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    22. I have a love-hate relationship with parenting books. There is something about parenting "experts" who share anecdote after anecdote of times that they quickly and easily corrected their friends and clients to solve all parenting problems that tend to rub me the wrong way. I don't believe in a one-size-fits-all parenting approach and the tone, as others have mentioned, is a bit condescending. Yet I continue to read these books because I am interested in what has worked for others and curious abo [...]

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    23. This book had great advice for dealing with 18month olds and above and I will remind myself to revisit it during those years. The information on babies was okay. Lots was info/research from other authors so I'll pick up their books for the full story (I know and want Noah on a schedule but how if he wakes at a different time each day). I think Dr. Jenn is a parent possibly to the extreme (3year old twins know 3 languages plus ASL, did not see any TV until 3yrs old, etc) but I did feel like I cou [...]

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    24. This was a tricky book to review, because I did find it interesting but I also disagreed with the author's points enough to make me dislike the book. Just the name of this book tipped me off that I disagreed with the author! I think the crazed parents trying to give their babies a "head start" are taking everything way too far. I think the most important thing is to give babies lots of love and attention (which is hard to do when they're away from home taking classes in Mandarin, like the author [...]

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    25. I liked browing through this book for the anecdotes that are sprinkled throughout the book (it's always fun to read about other parents' experiences!) The two sections that really caught my eye were 1) how sign language benefits young children (by developing both sides of the brain and enabling them to communicate with their hands before they can communicate verbally) and 2) how growing up bilingual (or even trilingual!) can make children more verbal and expressive. There's also a section on the [...]

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    26. This book contains a lot of good tips about parenting. I personally selected this book because it was recommended by a friend. The advice given in here is easy to follow most of the time, but some things like going all organic in food & all pure cotton fabrics are not so easy. I understand that babies nowadays are more exposed to dangerous chemicals in the environment, in the food, fabrics and even toys, so trying to eliminate these elements from them is important, but it is also expensive.T [...]

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    27. It's a good survey book of other parenting books and methods. It can be a bit preachy and for nervous new parents might make you upset that you haven't stared teaching your kid Sign language at 3 months or enrolled them in Chinese classes. But I'd you're not the A rupee personality I think you can take the good from this and move on. I liked the information about toxins, more encouragement about living tv free, scheduling, routines, reading books to your child and communication. The bits on prev [...]

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    28. You have a baby and all you want is to be the best for your little cutie. This is a lot of book with very basic principles we've heard before. Your baby will be a Superbaby if you talk to them a lot, teach them to sign, don't let them watch too much TV and keep them away from toxic house cleaners and the like. Another author with advice, some of it common sense and you read it in hopes you have a kid that thrives. Sometimes I wonder though if reading all these parenting books doesn't make you cr [...]

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    29. I have always felt that knowledge is power. So teaching your child gives them a head start on life. And those first three years can be ever so important. Superbaby is a book that helps you with tools, tips and techniques to help your child with their potential. I love that it gives you ways to reduce resistance and avoid tantrums. This will really help my niece and nephew with their middle daughter. She is already quite a handful. But there are more tools on sleep habits, language development, s [...]

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    30. Full of so much information -- overwhelming! It took me a long time to read because my brain was on overload every few pages. A lot of good info and tips for raising a happy and healthy child, but I felt some of it is a bit overkill. Based on some the authors stats and recommendations, it is amazing that any of us ever survived being raised by our parents. I think it could have been organized a bit better as well, it's kind of a jumbled mess. But I did gain some knowledge and I know my child wil [...]

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