Pride/Prejudice: A Novel of Mr. Darcy, Elizabeth Bennet, and Their Forbidden Lovers

  • Title: Pride/Prejudice: A Novel of Mr. Darcy, Elizabeth Bennet, and Their Forbidden Lovers
  • Author: Ann Herendeen
  • ISBN: 9780061863134
  • Page: 295
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pride Prejudice A Novel of Mr Darcy Elizabeth Bennet and Their Forbidden Lovers Audacious and masterful True to Austen s spirit Ann Herendeen has given us a compelling and sexual novel of manners Pamela Regis author of A Natural History of the Romance Novel Ann Herendeen s Pr
    Audacious and masterful.True to Austen s spirit, Ann Herendeen has given us a compelling, and sexual, novel of manners Pamela Regis, author of A Natural History of the Romance Novel Ann Herendeen s Pride Prejudice a novel of Mr Darcy, Elizabeth Bennett, and their other loves revisits the classic Jane Austen work to fill in the gaps that the original left unexplained Audacious and masterful.True to Austen s spirit, Ann Herendeen has given us a compelling, and sexual, novel of manners Pamela Regis, author of A Natural History of the Romance Novel Ann Herendeen s Pride Prejudice a novel of Mr Darcy, Elizabeth Bennett, and their other loves revisits the classic Jane Austen work to fill in the gaps that the original left unexplained and unexplored Ingenious, brazen, and unrelentingly entertaining yet always appreciative and respectful of one of the world s most beloved literary works this masterful reinvention by the acclaimed author of Phyllida and the Brotherhood of Philander is truly a Pride and Prejudice for the 21st Century.

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      Posted by:Ann Herendeen
      Published :2019-06-12T16:40:52+00:00

    About Ann Herendeen


    1. A native New Yorker and lifelong resident of Brooklyn, Ann Herendeen is a graduate of Princeton University, where she majored in English while maintaining a strong interest in English history She enjoys reading and writing for escape.Ann writes from the third perspective, the woman who prefers a bisexual husband and enjoys a polyamorous, m m f menage With Phyllida and the Brotherhood of Philander, Ann put a new twist on a traditional form, creating the ultimate love story she always wanted to read an m m f Regency romance In Pride Prejudice, a finalist in the Bisexual Fiction category for the 2011 Lambda Literary Award, she dares to tell the hidden bisexual story within Jane Austen s classic novel.In the summer of 2011, Ann launched her e book series, Eclipsis Lady Amalie s memoirs, beginning with the novella Recognition These novels and novellas, set in a sword and sorcery world, follow the telepathic Amelia Herzog as she finds love, a family, and a home, while addressing issues of feminism, ecology and sexuality.


    868 Comments


    1. Oh dear. Perhaps it's my own failing and there's something I fail to understand about the real motivations for writing, but I find it hard to believe that when Ann Herendeen set out to write this homoerotic slash version of Pride and Prejudice that this published result really conveys the exact sentiments to the reader that she intended. I can understand the creative ambition that would drive a writer to put some kind of twist on a Jane Austen novel they're classic and amazing and many readers l [...]

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    2. To start, I have absolutely nothing against the content of this book. I've been around long enough and read enough fanfiction based on series/books/movies spanning many genres. Pretty much nothing can faze me. I'm sure this book is meant to be tongue-in-cheek and a bit shocking. The "Achilles/Patroclus" type of relationship between Darcy and Bingley doesn't squick me. End disclaimer.See, I'm a P&P retelling/reinvention/modern adaptation collector. I've got shelves full of books putting a dif [...]

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    3. I give this story credit for being unlike any P&P variation I've ever read before. It was an interesting take on the close friendships presented to us in the original.With that being said, there were other parts that just seemed out of place to me. I didn't enjoy Darcy's characterization, especially with his domineering behaviour over Bingley in the slightest, and his behaviour made me question the validity of his feelings for Elizabeth. Most of the story deals with the "gaps in the story", [...]

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    4. As you can probably gather from the title, this book is an excuse for the author to write lots of sex scenes between Mr. Darcy and Mr. Bingley. And to promote her other book by having its main character be an acquaintance of Mr. Darcy. (This is probably the most obnoxious part of the entire novel and had me skipping any page that mentioned the Brotherhood of Philander by the end.) While I didn't completely dislike everything about this book, it has many many problems.First, if you are not EXTREM [...]

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    5. Curiosity has many times been a motivating factor for me to reach out and snag a book. A naughty, bawdy version of Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice fell in with this motivation. I was all set for a book that would make me squirm and get flustered because it was taken such liberties with the P&P story.But I wasn't far in before I realized that I was actually distracted and unfocused. While yes, it was uber avant guarde with forbidden relationships of the times namely gay, bi-sexual, and op [...]

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    6. Ok this book was strange ?! I hope it won't affect the way I see Pride and Prejudice, mr. Darcy and all the others. In Pride/Prejudice Ann Herendeen shows us a totally different interpretation of Austens book. She finds something more than friendship between Darcy and Bingley. The two men love each other in a totally different way and in the beginning I had the feeling they just wanted to marry a woman because society wanted/ expected them to. After reading a while though, I discovered I was wro [...]

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    7. a number of readers seem to be missing the point of this book. Herendeen, in her concluding author's notes, states explicitly that part of her purpose in producing this treatment of P&P is to review the original from the perspective of a 21st century person. I think she does this splendidly. Unrequited love and the comedy of manners and the unresolved sexual tension is all great and whatever, but this version of Austen's characters actually conveys upon them agency, both political and sexual [...]

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    8. I hated this book on so many levels. I'm far from a prude, but imagining Darcy and Bingley as gay lovers was just pushing the envelope a bit too far And the sordidness of the sex acts was just revolting. I figure the author must passionately despise Austen fans like myself; former English majors swooning over Colin Firth in a wet shirt. Otherwise, she wouldn't have attepted to destroy the characters in so complete and twisted a manner. While ordinarily I quite enjoy reimaginings of famous novels [...]

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    9. I absolutely LOVED this book. I appreciate the manner in which Ann Herendeen paid tribute to Jane Austen without mimicking her. I thoroughly enjoyed how the plot twists, while staying true to the thrust of the original story, drew life, and a wonderful sense of life, by the very nature of the differences Herendeen created to make her story as plausible as Austen's. I also think Jane would roll her eyes and roll over in her grave were she to read this. Not because she wouldn't like it, but rather [...]

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    10. I am addicted to very few things, and generally have the ability to try at least anything once. The one thing that I absolutely cannot get enough of, however, is "Pride and Prejudice". (I blame that early reader for students I picked up in 1998 at a Library in Mayenne, France. I was there to study French, and found the book in a section for young learners. It was a great introduction to the story.)When I was given this book as a gift, I was at first concerned that the queer themes were only pres [...]

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    11. Let me begin by saying that I'm a big Pride and Prejudice junkie. I love to read other author's takes on Darcy and Elizabeth. My fasication stated years ago when I read Bridget Jones's Diary. I quickly went and bought the BBC miniseries Pride and Prejudice starring Colin Firth/Jennifer Ehle. (Yes I know someone else recently starred in a P&P movie and all I can say about that is BLEH) Anyhoo, from the moment I saw the BBC miniseries, you couldn't stop me. I couldn't get enough. 97% of adapta [...]

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    12. 90% of what you need to know about Pride/Prejudice is contained in the slash. Yes, this is a novel of copious Edwardian boning. Yes, it's also Jane Austen fanfic: obviously a highly profitable business, though not particularly creative. That said, this is fairly well done for what it is. It doesn't fall into the more dominant traps of the Austen fanfic genre, or really the fanfic genre as a whole. For instance, none of the characters from Austen's other novels show up; an offhand reference to He [...]

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    13. I thought I had learned my lesson after trying to read Darcy's Story and Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but then I found Pride/Prejudice on a top 10 list of bisexual fiction. A queer retelling of one of my favorite novels? Well, I had to read it.Let me start off by saying, I really like the premise. I like that a queer retelling of Pride and Prejudice exists, but this novel doesn't come close to reaching its full potential. I wanted to love it, but the first half dragged for me and while the s [...]

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    14. Basically, every scene was either sex (sometimes creepy, often described using terms like "tumescent manhood") or conversation (aka endless processing and reinterpretation-via-dialogue of events that happened in Pride and Prejudice but take place only offstage in this novel), meaning that nothing ever happens! Also, I respect the author for trying to tell an unconventional, polyamorous love story, but,a) why did it have to be using the characters and events of Pride and Prejudice, which limits t [...]

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    15. I am a huge P&P addict so much so, that I will read just about any thing out there. I was a little shocked to find out that this one was not what I had originally thought it was about. Although once I started it I found it to be very intriguing. I have to say that I have nothing against this type of content. I am all for freedom of expression and art. To me love is love no matter the form as long as it is between two consenting adults. With that being said, I will say that I found this book [...]

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    16. This is a slash book. Yes. A slash book about possible gay/lesbian romantic triangles with Elizabeth/Charlotte/Charles/Fitzwilliam. It is as odd and goofy as it sounds but a fun read. It uses the events and characters from the original book without too much rehashing of the original scenes.How it does this is by telling a lot of the story from Darcy's point of view; we go with him to the city after he convinces Charles to flee Jane's clutches, the visit with Wickham during the Lydia chase as wel [...]

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    17. What really bothered me about this book was not the huge amount of sex. I wasn't a huge fan of Darcy fucking Bingley, partly because like many P&P fans Darcy was my first fictional crush and I have loved him for years. My real issue was that she made every character in this completely and totally unlikable. Elizabeth was a bitch, and at the end, an awful mother who didn't seem to love her family like in the original. Jane was bigoted, Darcy was an asshole, Bingley a charmless wet rag. P& [...]

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    18. I blushed so much reading this slash fanfiction. So what happened is this: I read and loved Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell and got curious about the fanfiction world. I've read tons of Austenesque stuff and generally enjoyed it, although good ones are few and far between; but still, it's interesting to see what other authors do with the characters and themes. Anyway, my curiosity of fandom introduced me to the concept of slash fanfiction -- in which characters from literature or popular culture are i [...]

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    19. I was honestly quite shocked at this book and I have to be honest, I really didn't like it. I'm a definite Jane Austen fan and the spin offs of her books, I do tend to like a lot, but this one wasath to my favorite characters in a book. I know the author was trying to do a different take on the Pride and Prejudice story by changing all the characters into gay men and women, but seriously? Don't change them, make a new story or something but leave these characters alone and name them something ot [...]

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    20. I'm finished! I'm finally finished! I desperately wanted AND tried to like this book a sexual relationship between Darcy & Bingley is HOT, but no. It was all wrong. So disappointing. I hated (!) the characters & what the author did to them. What a waste. I did have a favorite quote, though: (Anne contemplating a perfect relationship.) "Black was nice. Comfortable to look at. A small, thin man in a black coat, who consorted with other men like himself, but who cared for Anne alone among [...]

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    21. Bi!Darcy I believe. But him and Bingley as lover? No, I don't see it. Especially not him as the older man seducing younger Bingley to his homo ways. Possessive Darcy? Yes. Seductive Darcy? No. We know very little about Bingley as a person, but he's so easily and completely influenced by Darcy, making their romance worrying.Now Wikham and Darcy I believe. Not necessarily romantic, or even sexual, but a shared desire. I see Darcy as too much of a prude, to put it bluntly, to pursue anything, espec [...]

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    22. This is what I get for taking out a book before reading the description or the reviews. I brought this with me on a business trip since it was almost due at the library, and I didn't really bring anything else to read. I cannot go without reading material of some sort. This book, however? SO. MUCH. REGRET.This book could win an award for the most literally titled book ever. What else would you call Pride & Prejudice slash fiction? I really should've seen this one coming, but as aforesaid, I [...]

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    23. This book is trashy. You have to accept that if you're going to read it, especially if you're an Austen fan as I am. It is an excuse to put lots and lots of gay and straight and a tiny bit of lesbian sex into the world of Pride and Prejudice. Sex happens about every five pages, which is why I call it trash. It's a bodice-ripper.That said, Herendeen, writes adequately and has an occasional good turn of phrase and gets most of the period right. I enjoyed it very much, but I am quite accustomed to [...]

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    24. If I like something I take it to the nth degree and that is what happened when I first read Pride and Prejudice. Now I read anything I can that has to do with the story. I got this book for Christmas and couldn't wait to read it.In my opinion this book had some very strong points. The first one is I really liked the premise for the book, I have never read a book with this alternate explanation for the events that occurred. Another thing I liked about this book was that the characters called Mr. [...]

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    25. Interesting! I've read better, but I've also read much worse. And every fan base needs its own slash! The story is basically the same, but with gay and lesbian pairings sort of worked in around the edges and behind the scenes; while the actions of the original story remained much the same, a lot of the motivations were changed. When I picked it up, I was hoping for something a little truer to the original style, and a little more subtle - more substance, less smut - but on the other hand, for an [...]

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    26. This was on the "Choice Reads" shelf at KCLS, further proof that most of the books on that shelf haven't been read by anyone working at KCLS. The author is a librarian, so I checked it out without reading much else about it. I was not compelled to keep reading after the first chapter. It starts off by presenting Darcy and Bingley as really, really good friends. I skimmed through it and found that Lizzie and Charlotte are also really, really good friends. And Darcy and Wickham? They're really, re [...]

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    27. I'm not quite sure why I kept at this. I was somewhat intrigued that the plot of Pride and Prejudice was about to end and the book still had 100 or so pages to go.This book could have been excellent but in reality was terrible. It seemed like an excuse for some attention for Herendeen, this could have been any smutty romance novel but why not use an established, well liked classic to get your mark out there?As the main characters were really elizabeth and Darcy, why was so much of this book dedi [...]

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    28. I seldom give up on a book before finishing it, but this was just SO badly done. The concept is amusing--the real reason Darcy is so protective of Bingley is that they're lovers. Elizabeth and Charlotte also have a little secret. What's not to like? Apparently, this book. If the subject matter had been handled better, in ways that suited the period, it would have been fine, but to have characters in a society that spoke openly about very little speaking openly about this was just silly. I applie [...]

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    29. I loathed this book. The sex scenes were crass (but hilarious when the sample chapter was read aloud by my Kindle - probably not the author's intention) and only detracted from the "plot" for me. Darcy's adventures in the gentleman's club read like cheesy fanfiction, complete with obligatory S&M and orgy scene. The ending? Completely unbelievable and a massive insult to the characters of Elizabeth and Jane. I skipped whole pages of pointless scenes just to read the end. This book had no rede [...]

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    30. Boyfriend bought this one for me thinking it was Pride and Prejudice (which I would have loved.n). I tried to give it a go and have no issues with erotica or LGBT material was just bad. I could tell the author was trying really hard in the modern world to write the class of the classics into her work, and just failed miserably. Cheap, totally predictable and honestly if it wasn't for the subject matter I'd call it a young adult (at best) book. Hated it. Rarely do not finish a book because I'm af [...]

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