The Miernik Dossier

  • Title: The Miernik Dossier
  • Author: Charles McCarry
  • ISBN: 9781585677368
  • Page: 417
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Miernik Dossier Paul Christopher was a cool urbane American mixed up with a comical Polish exile a beautiful Hungarian seductress and an African prince with a lust for women and power It was up to Christopher to d
    Paul Christopher was a cool, urbane American mixed up with a comical Polish exile, a beautiful Hungarian seductress, and an African prince with a lust for women and power It was up to Christopher to discover who was who in this sticky international mess.

    • Free Read [Romance Book] ☆ The Miernik Dossier - by Charles McCarry ↠
      417 Charles McCarry
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Romance Book] ☆ The Miernik Dossier - by Charles McCarry ↠
      Posted by:Charles McCarry
      Published :2019-06-06T01:25:16+00:00

    About Charles McCarry


    1. McCarry served in the United States Army, where he was a correspondent for Stars and Stripes, has been a small town newspaperman, and was a speechwriter in the Eisenhower administration From 1958 to 1967 he worked for the CIA, under deep cover in Europe, Asia, and Africa However, his cover was not as a writer or journalist McCarry was editor at large for National Geographic and has contributed pieces to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and other national publications He is married with four grown sons His family is from The Berkshires area of western Massachusetts, where he currently lives.McCarry is best known for a series of books concerning the life of super spy Paul Christopher Born in Germany before WWII to a German mother and an American father, Christopher joins the CIA after the war and becomes one of its most effective spies After launching an unauthorized investigation of the Kennedy assassination, Christopher becomes a pariah to the agency and a hunted man Eventually, he spends ten years in a Chinese prison before being released and embarking on a solution to the mystery that has haunted him his entire life the fate of his mother, who disappeared at the beginning of WWII The books are notable for their historical detail and depiction of spycraft, as well as their careful and extensive examination of Christopher s relationship with his family, friends, wives, and lovers.


    948 Comments


    1. On his experience being a deep-cover agent for the CIA: "It's one of the most boring occupations in the world, punctuated by moments of ecstasy. You sit around for days, sometimes for weeks, waiting for something you think you have made happen, to happen. And sometimes it does, and sometimes it doesn't. Or waiting for an agent to show up. They're famous for not doing that, or showing up in the wrong place or on the wrong day, wrong hour." Charles McCarryIn the 1980s I read just about every espio [...]

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    2. A different style to my usual reading taste. This spy story unfolds through phone taps, reports, character's version or interpretation of events. Even though it was initially difficult to get into due to all the different perspectives it did suit the story as events played out.I couldn't with all honesty say that I enjoyed any of the characters on offer here - no doubt because I was suspicious of their motives within the story. I found them all unappealing with the exception of Sasha the Russian [...]

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    3. I must confess that after the Berlin Wall came down, I had this feeling that that was it for the Cold War spy novel. So I was truly happy to find this book, which was written in 1971, so I could once again relive the Cold War spy experience. The Miernik Dossier (the first of the Paul Christopher series), is written in a style that one would find if they could infiltrate the files of an espionage agency and open up an actual dossier. The story is told through reports of various agents, intercepte [...]

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    4. Espionage is never clear cut - all the best spy thrillers make that point, some labour it. Alan Furst has a habit of creating romance out of the dilemma; John Le Carre finds victims in it. In the Miernik Dossier, Charles McCarry carries the idea beyond the end of the book. Not only does he leave the central question unresolved (was Miernik a spy or not?), he actually goes further: the reader is left wondering if the question mark that hangs over him or her at the end of the book is actually refl [...]

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    5. "The Miernik Dossier" introduces the reader to the CIA agent, sometime poet, and polyglot Paul Christopher and the world during the middle years of the Cold War. The novel begins in Geneva, Switzerland in the late spring, where a Polish civil servant (Tadeusz Miernik) employed on contract with the World Research Organization (WRO) faces having to return to Poland pending the imminent expiration of said contract. Miernik sought, in vain, an extension to his contract. He is fearful of being arrest [...]

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    6. A beautiful piece of spy fiction, presented not in a regular narrative format, but as a collection of radio intercepts, diary entries, agent reports, cables to and from spies and their case officers, and so on.The plot revolves around a group of individuals and friends, all of whom but one live in Geneva in 1959, at the height of The Cold War. At the center of the tale is Tadeusz Miernik, a Polish national working for the World Research Organization, a UN agency. Miernik is about to lose his job [...]

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    7. Never heard of McCarry before reading recent NYTBR interview with mystery maven-guru Otto Penzler, who declared McCarry his favorite espionage novelist, living or dead. I was skeptical, but upon further review not only understand his ranking but come close to endorsing it. I grabbed this one off library shelf with just a quick read of plot blurb, and it wasn't until I got home that i discovered the book is structured literally like a dossier. I groaned. I usually prefer a central point of view i [...]

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    8. Charles McCarry manages a steep feat in this novel -- he matches the sophistication of Graham Greene's espionage 'entertainments' with the literary integrity of a Paul Bowles-esque Northern African expedition. For real! If I were to ask for a spy book to be written for me, it might end up a lot like the Miernik Dossier -- Cold War suspicion, late-night border crossings, fancy European cocktail parties, double agents, religious & sexual tension, standard tradecraft and introspective anti-hero [...]

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    9. A very good espionage novel written in the early 1970's. The story is told through various agent reports, transcripts, journal entries, etc. and when I saw the structure of the book I was a bit hesitant but the plot unfolded smoothly and each character was fully realized.

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    10. THE MIERNIK DOSSIER is wonderful recreational reading. It is the first of McCarry's Paul Christopher novels and it is engrossing. There is no narrative. The novel is presented as a dossier; that is, a collection of documents in a file representing the fruits of a failed operation conducted by our CIA in Europe and North Africa in the late 1950s. The documents include reports submitted by American and British operatives, excerpts from the journal of a suspected Polish spy, the debriefing of vario [...]

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    11. I had never heard of this book--which it turns out is the first of ten with a recurrent character. It is quite good and really unusual in form, I think. (I don't believe the others in the series follow the form, but I could be wrong about that.) It is, as the title suggests, a dossier--a collection of materials that support a narrative about a man named Miernik. The materials are things like transcripts of wiretaps, reports filed by a variety of agents, notes from debriefings and such like. Only [...]

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    12. I originally learned about this author from a list Anthony Bourdain published of novels written by real spies. More recently another friends was reading later novels in the Paul Christopher set, so I decided to go back to the beginning.I'm very glad I did. This was a pleasure to read, both in the subject matter and in the style - the entire novel is basically a dossier from 1959 on Tadeusz Miernik, a Polish man who some people believe to be working for the Russians. Or he might just be a man wh [...]

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    13. This is a hard book to read because of its format as a dossier full of documents, intercepts, reports and debriefings. It puts the reader in the position of being a Counterintelligence officer tasked with determining what is real and what isn't. Every statement by every character must be assessed within the wider context to determine i) who are the spies, ii) what is their real mission. In the end I think it is the most superb intelligence novel that I've read by an American author. I read it 2 [...]

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    14. Makes le Carre seem like a writer for a "True Romance" magazine.

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    15. I rated this book just ok, and it has nothing to do with the quality of the writing, or even the style. A former CIA operative himself, McCarry presents the plot in a series of reports, telegrams, cyphers and other means of communication to piece together the life and death of Tadeusz Miernik, a seemingly bumbling Polish scientist who could lead a terrorist attack to set the Cold War aflame. It is also the introduction of Paul Christopher, an operative who appears in several other books by McCar [...]

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    16. I understand why others like this book, but I am not as enthusiastic about it as some. I *did* enjoy it, but the technique (gimmick?) of telling the story through a series of interviews, reports and debriefings gets stale after awhile. I also found the story confusing occasionally and somewhat ambiguous and despite all the activity, the plot really amounts to nothing. Indeed I’m thinking that might be the point of it. Lastly the majority of the characters are not very likable and the protagoni [...]

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    17. This is McCarry's first book, and for some reasons it happens to be the most known and reviewed of his books; it is, however, far from being his best. This seemed to me a sort of "divertissement" than a real espionage novel.I have come to the Miernik Dossier after reading a bunch of other novels by the author, and luckily so, if not I am not sure I would have read a second one.Get me right, this is an OK book, its narrative device is quite original (the story is told out of a number of intellige [...]

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    18. The Miernik Dossier uses an interesting trick of using using reports, interviews, leaked communications and other "file items" to weave together a narrative. This gives the illusion that the reader is an intelligence analyst, piecing together the events based on the information gathered. It's basically the literary equivalent of a "found footage" movie (like Blair Witch Project).It's also exciting to see the Cold War take center stage. It's a prime time for espionage and it's great to see a mode [...]

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    19. one of the most celebral plotlines ever.Eventual plotline end entirely depends on the reader's read of the book.Miernik dossier (published in 1973) is still far above the spy fiction which is pressed out today.

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    20. Rather different in format - a tale told simply by reference to records and documents. The concept was a little flawed, evidenced by the author's reliance upon some unbelievably detailed diary entries. I did enjoy the read.

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    21. A superior potboiler made more significant by the fact the story is 40 years old yet is still enjoyable - which cannot be said for many of its contemporaries.

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    22. Not for me. Very dated. Trying to be too clever but not succeeding. Silly really.

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    23. Kindle edition has an incredible amount of typos.

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    24. Couldn't finish.lost interest and did not like the dossier format.

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    25. Recommended but not as good as Alan Furst.

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    26. I read this book after it received high praise from Olen Steinhauer, whose spy novels I love. I did not love the Miernik Dossier, however.The Miernik Dossier, by Charles McCarry, purports to be a collection of documents describing a "typical operation" for the CIA. The subject of this operation is Tadeusz Miernik, a Polish national who has been called back to his home country from Geneva (where he works for the WRO) and fears he will be imprisoned by the secret police if he returns. (The novel i [...]

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    27. This time I was not as dubious. The first time I encountered a novel fashioned solely of various reports from a variety of sources, it was a book called The Anderson Tapes by Lawrence Sanders, and I responded, in part, with: “I have to admit I had my doubts: a novel told entirely through the transcripts of various wiretaps? I had forgotten that this man was a master of the form.” This is my first exposure to Charles McCarry but apparently he was as equally accomplished.The story begins with [...]

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    28. I did not care for the format of telling the story through memos, reports, letters, etc. I finally wrote a list of characters since the names were similar, and their titles and jobs meant nothing to me. The story was a bit wild and wooly and sometimes entertaining, but the characters were just thataracters!

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    29. Charles McCarry is one of our most under appreciated living authors. Its shocking that he is not as well known as Le Carre or even Furst. McCarry served in the CIA and his background shows in the details of his spy novels. His first novel the Miernik Dossier is a terrifically engaging work recommended to anyone who likes literary thrillers.While the story, involving the trip of Polish official who may or may not be a spy to Sudan is excellent, the book shines in its verisimilitude, even in its o [...]

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    30. 1959. An intercepted message indicates the Soviets may be sending an agent into Sudan to assist some anti-government rebels. Further investigation points to one man, and the Americans have a plan to turn this to their advantage.I don't have much experience with epistolary novels, but my limited exposure makes me feel they're problematic, chiefly because I don't believe people write with that much detail in their regular correspondence. There's too much of the novelist in the documents and not en [...]

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