The Education of Robert Nifkin

  • Title: The Education of Robert Nifkin
  • Author: Daniel Pinkwater
  • ISBN: 9780618552085
  • Page: 180
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Education of Robert Nifkin The Education of Robert Nifkin is the education of a beatnik Set in s Chicago and conveyed in the form of a college essay Robert Nifkin details his journey from a mind numbing high school that sm
    The Education of Robert Nifkin is the education of a beatnik Set in 1950s Chicago and conveyed in the form of a college essay, Robert Nifkin details his journey from a mind numbing high school that smells to the curriculum free carnival of a private school ruled by bohemians, beatniks, and freaks.

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      Posted by:Daniel Pinkwater
      Published :2019-08-23T00:24:49+00:00

    About Daniel Pinkwater


    1. Daniel Manus Pinkwater is an author of mostly children s books and is an occasional commentator on National Public Radio He attended Bard College Well known books include Lizard Music, The Snarkout Boys and the Avocado of Death, Fat Men from Space, Borgel, and the picture book The Big Orange Splot Pinkwater has also illustrated many of his books in the past, although for recent works that task has passed to his wife Jill Pinkwater.


    596 Comments


    1. Daniel Pinkwater almost makes me angry. Having read all of his personal essays and NPR pieces (I even own his dog training book!), I could see that many of the elements and characters from this book were drawn from his own life. And it's just not fair. My teenage years were nothing like Robert Nifkin's! Or Pinkwater's, or Alan Mendelssohn's, or any of his other characters. I never skipped school, only to find a strange and fascinating group of delinquents and intellectuals to fall in with. I'm n [...]

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    2. As much as I love Daniel Pinkwater --- and I do, I have to admit I went into this with trepidation. Oh yes, trepidation. I've only ever read middle grade books from him, so knowing this was a YA had me wondering if he could pull it off. BUT OF COURSE HE DID!Daniel Pinkwater is a freaking genius. I've said it before and I'll say it again. Gen.ius.I imagine this book was influenced by his own experiences. Just guessing. It was hilarious, but in such a Pinkwater way. And just like I feel after ever [...]

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    3. This book was absolutely, positively the funniest book I have read this year. Robert Nifkin is a modern Holden Caulfield: i.e. witty, resourceful, not so self-absorbed. Robert goes from being a greasy, clueless new kid in a gigantic school district (thus, he is hardly acknowledged and can easily skip out of class) to a totally cool, artsy freak. If you have a teen who needs some inspiration, or if you need a quick and dirty book that will give you a cathartic humor experience (code for: I laughe [...]

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    4. Robert Nifkin is a teen in 1950’s Chicago writing an essay about his high school experience…and what an interesting one it is. He has Eastern European parents with their immigrant quirks, teachers obsessed with banishing communism, and a group of free-spirited beatnik friends. This reads like a character-driven classic, reminding me of books I read back in my high school years. This novel gives the reader a strong sense of the Chicago setting and the spirit of that decade.

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    5. If you had a choice between sitting in a school where you all you did was copy from the blackboard all day and going to a school where you didn't even have to show up every day, you'd probably make the same choice Robert Nifkin did. But, as he explains in his college essay, he probably learned a lot more *not* going to class than he ever did showing up to school.

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    6. A recent boingboing review by Cory Doctorow of a Daniel Pinkwater book I haven't read? Of course I'll pick it up!Fun, quick little read. Pinkwater's trademark dorky outcast kid finds his place in the world, with moments of hilarity and long stretches of absurdity.

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    7. It is fun to follow the character's awareness of the world -- it paints a beautiful picture of Chicago and a shows how horrible school can be. It is uneven in pacing, and probably too ambitious for the size of the book, but has it's share of quotes and humorous moments. It is set in the 1950's.

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    8. Robert Nifkin’s parents emigrated rather recently to the States, and he’s been put in public school – which he hates. His father has all sorts of interesting ideas about child development and teenagers (believing that when one hits high school one is an adult), and although Robert isn’t allowed to smoke cigarettes, his father keeps him supplied with the more manly rum-soaked cigars. Nifkin’s schoolmates and teachers are all strange or quirky in some way, but school sucks the life out o [...]

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    9. Robert Nifkin, a "boy of size" who survived a semester of bigoted, Commie-hunting incompetent teachers and moved on to a loosely-controlled "school" of all but self-educating "classes," is applying for college entry. This story is the product of the requisite application essay question asking the candidate to describe his or her schooling experience.A very original book dealing with the decidedly unique trials and triumphs of a boy coming of age in a world where the adults seem to be the primary [...]

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    10. Like most any Pinkwater story, there’s a lot of funny moments. One of my favorite lines is when Pamela/Natasha accepts a cigar from Robert. “This is good. It tastes like squirrels at play.” And as a teacher, it’s easy to appreciate a principal who kicks off the Day One assembly with “Shaddup, students.” But the book earns its fifth star with the message that school and sadism are not synonyms. More students than not are left behind in the Wheaton School model of dysfunction and aimle [...]

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    11. Like most any Pinkwater story, there 19s a lot of funny moments. One of my favorite lines is when Pamela/Natasha accepts a cigar from Robert. 1CThis is good. It tastes like squirrels at play. 1D And as a teacher, it 19s easy to appreciate a principal who kicks off the Day One assembly with 1CShaddup, students. 1D But the book earns its fifth star with the message that school and sadism are not synonyms. More students than not are left behind in the Wheaton School model of dysfunction and aimless [...]

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    12. Daniel Pinkwater is one of my all-time favorite authors and so it was with a bit of surprise that the recent PR for his latest book made me realized that he had written several young adult novels that I had just plain missed. The Education of Robert Nifkin was my first catching up.Nifkin follows the titular character as he attempts to make his way through high school in 1950s Chicago. It's territory Pinkwater has covered before, but this time Chicago is just Chicago (not "Baconburg" or "Hogtown" [...]

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    13. This novel / novella in the vague shape of a college essay is the story of Robert Nifkin’s high school career. He first attended a public high school, where all of his teachers wrote long notes on the blackboard and the students were to copy them into their own notebooks. Not surprisingly, he found this immensely boring and stopped going to school. When the school system was about to send him to reform school, he found a private school that had few rules, where he was responsible for his own e [...]

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    14. I'm not sure why but I wasn't looking forward to reading this. Maybe it was the dated cover or not knowing anything about the book but I can't begin to say how wrong I was. I have no reservations calling this a more wry and sarcastic Catcher in the Rye. I felt the writing and tone were perfectly dated and made reading the story more fun and interesting. It reads like historical fiction even though it has many themes that today's coming of age stories have, girls, rebelling against authority, dis [...]

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    15. What i learned from "The education of Robert Nifin"would be that he tells us all of his problems dealing with the first year of high school. This book it reflex with most of are life because mostly of Roberts problems we all pass through them, well i did i don't know about all of the students. I also kind off like it, and kind of no, i like it because it tells all of his first year in high school and he did to have a better year but it was kind of boring is not my type of but that i was looking [...]

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    16. I remember really enjoying Daniel Pinkwater when I was younger. This book is very funny and has the quirky sense of logic you'd expect from him, but I just didn't find it as magical as his other works. It is very much a parody of high school, and on some levels it works brilliantly. I felt like it lost some focus toward the end when Robert discovered the somewhat anarchist and radical version of school. Interesting that Pinkwater highlights the Chicago Public Library, Bughouse Square, and other [...]

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    17. I'm not sure why but I wasn't looking forward to reading this. Maybe it was the dated cover or not knowing anything about the book but I can't begin to say how wrong I was. I have no reservations calling this a more wry and sarcastic Catcher in the Rye. I felt the writing and tone were perfectly dated and made reading the story more fun and interesting. It reads like historical fiction even though it has many themes that today's coming of age stories have, girls, rebelling against authority, dis [...]

      Reply

    18. If you've never read a Daniel Pinkwater book, which is probably most people, this is a pretty good primer. It's actually quite enjoyable. There was this one exchange that really resonated with me:"'Do you ever get the feeling you're in a black-and-white movie?' I asked Linda.'All the time,' she said"For some reason that stuck with me. It might not be Pinkwater's best young adult novel, but it's a lot of fun.

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    19. i like it soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo MUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    20. This wonderful memoiristic novel traces the high school career of a short, fat and painfully uncertain kid who may resemble the author in some ways, first to an uncaring and unpleasant public high school, and then to an expensive private school where education is optional. Unfortunately, the last fifty pages can't compare to the hysterically funny experiences of Robert at Riverview High.

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    21. A fun book about Chicago in the 50's, and the kind of fear-of-others that dominated society then. This is funny in the strange humor of all Pinkwater's books, but this isn't my favorite. Only because I see a limited audience for it-- I think adults would enjoy it as much or more than my average student.

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    22. Robert Nifkin has to write an admissions paper about his high school experience. Full of humor and unique and bizarre characters this story took us through 4 years of high school.This was a very different type of coming of age story. It was fun while I read it but was easily forgettable days later.

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    23. I love Daniel Pinkwater, but I had somehow never read this book, which is actually set in Chicago! I stumbled across it at the library and picked it up. If you like Pinkwater, you'll definitely like this. If you've never read Pinkwater, you should.

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    24. When you read the book everything makes perfect sense. Then, as soon as you think about it, you realize how crazy everyone in the book is. Its a new take on life of a teen.

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    25. This website is an experiment in watching my "currently reading" pile grow while I actually finish so few books.

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    26. I love Daniel Pinkwater. I've read this book before and I'll probably read it again someday.

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    27. this has one of the best opening lines ever in a kid's book: "my father was a son-of-a-bitch from eastern europe." it really just went up from there.

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    28. Hilarious and charming, but just not much there, there. Minor rather than major Pinkwater:).

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    29. Deeply weird, in a good way. The last school reminds me of the way I approached my own schooling, way back when :-)

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    30. This book was awful!!!!

      Reply

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