Microbe Hunters

  • Title: Microbe Hunters
  • Author: Paul de Kruif
  • ISBN: 9780156027779
  • Page: 164
  • Format: Paperback
  • Microbe Hunters This science classic by Paul de Kruif chronicles the pioneering bacteriological work of the first scientists to see and learn from the microscopic world Paul de Kruif s Microbe Hunters is a timeless d
    This science classic by Paul de Kruif chronicles the pioneering bacteriological work of the first scientists to see and learn from the microscopic world Paul de Kruif s Microbe Hunters is a timeless dramatization of the scientists, bacteriologists, doctors, and medical technicians who discovered microbes and invented the vaccines to counter them De Kruif reveals the nowThis science classic by Paul de Kruif chronicles the pioneering bacteriological work of the first scientists to see and learn from the microscopic world Paul de Kruif s Microbe Hunters is a timeless dramatization of the scientists, bacteriologists, doctors, and medical technicians who discovered microbes and invented the vaccines to counter them De Kruif reveals the now seemingly simple but really fundamental discoveries of science for instance, how a microbe was first viewed in a clear drop of rain water, and when, for the first time ever, Louis Pasteur discovered that a simple vaccine could save a man from the ravages of rabies by attacking the microbes that cause it.

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      Published :2019-06-01T13:49:13+00:00

    About Paul de Kruif


    1. Paul Henry de Kruif was an American microbiologist and author of Dutch descent Publishing as Paul de Kruif, he is most noted for his 1926 book, Microbe Hunters This book was not only a bestseller for a lengthy period after publication, it has remained high on lists of recommended reading for science and has been an inspiration for many aspiring physicians and scientists.He graduated from the University of Michigan with a Bachelor s degree 1912 and remained to obtain a Ph.D 1916 He immediately entered service as a Private in Mexico on the Pancho Villa Expedition and afterwards served as a Lieutenant and a Captain in World War I in France Because of his service in the Sanitary Corps, he had occasional contacts with leading French biologists of the period.After returning to the University of Michigan as an Assistant Professor, De Kruif briefly worked for the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research He then became a full time writer.De Kruif assisted Sinclair Lewis with his Pulitzer Prize winning novel Arrowsmith 1925 by providing the scientific and medical information required by the plot, along with character sketches Even though Lewis was listed as the sole author, De Kruif s contribution was significant, and he received 25 percent of the royalties Many believe the characters in the novel represent people known to De Kruif, with Martin Arrowsmith a physician, unlike de Kruif possibly representing himself.Some of his writings created problems for him Some essays written while working for the Rockefeller Institute led to his dismissal Ronald Ross, one of the scientists featured in Microbe Hunters, took exception to how he was described, so the British edition deleted that chapter to avoid a libel suit.De Kruif was a staff writer for the Ladies Home Journal, Country Gentleman, and the Readers Digest, contributing articles on Science and Medicine He also served on commissions to promote research into Infantile Paralysis.The Sweeping Wind, his last book, is his autobiography.


    605 Comments


    1. This book is what introduced me to the world of medical research. After reading it in 1963, I decided this is how I wanted to spend my life. The writing is probably dated now, but the way it captured the excitement of research discoveries convinced me to pursue this as a career. I'm almost 61 years old now and retired, but I spent over 35 years of my life pursuing this career and never regretted it.The book discusses the giants of germ theory and does so in a way that makes these scientists appr [...]

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    2. Read for the 2015 Reading Challenge: #25 A book you were supposed to read in school but didn't. I’ll put it simple. I love microbiology. It is fascinating how much you can learn from something so little. This book came to me thanks to my fist Microbiology class “General Microbiology” which was my favorite. I never read it complete, but thanks to this challenge I’m in, I rediscovered it and was able to read the whole thing. It is a simple book with all the mayor microbiology discovers, to [...]

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    3. Imagine, in the 18th century, the first human being on earth to look through his crude, home made microscope at a living microbe. Those that followed him figured out that it was these wee beasties that made us sick and even die by the millions. Late in the 19th century, Louis Pasteur figured out ways to kill bacteria in livestock, wine and beer, and ultimately humans. Imagine comforting a grieving mother hysterical about her baby dying of diphtheria with a cure! Not just comforting words as her [...]

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    4. I've read this book when I was 16 and later when I was 23. I guess it shaped my life. It is maybe why I work today with the miniature world of microorganisms.

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    5. ¡Me encanto! Es un libro fantástico, con una combinacion perfecta de ciencia, humor y dramatismo. Además, presenta un leguaje entendible pero sin dejar de lado ciertos términos pertenecientes al lenguaje científico, por lo tanto, no hay una gran dificultad en su lectura.Es un magnífico libro, te hace sentir emocionado al conocer los triunfos, las derrotas y la vida de los cazadores de microbios en su intento por resguardar a la humanidad de los minúsculos peligros a los que nos enfrentamo [...]

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    6. FINALLY worked my way through this one! Not sure why I got so bogged down towards the end. Maybe it had something to do with all the action moving to Africa and the very of-the-times but still awkward for a modern person to read racism kicked in? Nothing outright awful just terminology and tone, but still weird for me. Mostly though it was interesting to read about microbiology in the days before DNA discovery, which now plays such a huge role in ALL biology. And impressive how much work they co [...]

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    7. Interesting account written in the 1920s prose in which the whole world is filled with wonder and a frank account of the harsher realities. I love how lots of people gladly volunteered their lives in a gamble for a cure; not sure a) nanny government would LET you and b) if perfectly healthy people would subject themselves to same torment. I also enjoyed seeing the retelling, if to be believed, of these peoples' lives -- such strong personalities.

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    8. Potential readers need to know right away that this book is close to 100 years old, the ONLY reason this matters is that some of the language and the style of the writing was of its time. Terms for peoples and countries have changed, don't be put off. Despite this I can see why this book remains in print. It is fantastic history story telling long before "Horrible Histories" reinvented the genre. This book is unafraid and indeed revels in the wild characters that populated the microbiology niche [...]

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    9. Written in 1926, this is a classic collection of essays about the pioneers of microbiology. Beginning with Leeuwenhoek, with chapters on Pasteur (x2), Koch, through Bruce, Walter Reed and Paul Ehrlich, the essays span the time period from 1650 to 1910. De Kruif writes with an infectious enthusiasm and a strong narrative drive, so that the essays hold up remarkably well - one is swept up in the story. What is particularly impressive is his ability to set each researcher's accomplishments squarely [...]

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    10. Easily the most entertaining book on microbiology I've ever read. Which isn't too hard, because I've only read textbooks until now. Fun read if you want to learn more about the science of bacteria and viruses.

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    11. De Kruif trae a la vida a los pioneros de la Microbiología con tal encanto que te transporta a ese momento y te imaginas tal cuál pudieron ser sus aventuras. Los detalles con los relata los momentos trascendentes de estos pioneros de la ciencia son exquisitos. Es un libro divertido y además sus historias capturan la mente y modos de estos científicos (algunos más famosos que otros) y se zambulle en los misterios y peripecias que se enfrentaron siguiendo su pasión por descubrir más.

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    12. This was one of the books at grandmother's cottage in SW Michigan which I read up there one summer a couple of years before entering high school and taking my first real biology course. Basically, it consists of twelve inspiring biographies about the founders of microbiology. I was certainly inspired. Reading the book made me think about becoming something other than an astronomer or cosmologist.

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    13. I put off reading this for so long because, really, it looked so boring! I tell you now, in all seriousness, this is the best book about science I have ever read. And, it was written in the 1920s! Seriously, I would actually use the word "swashbuckling" to describe this tale of scientists hunting for microbes. Great characters, good story, excellent writing. Highly recommended!

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    14. Un buen ejemplo de cómo explicar la ciencia a través de las "aventuras" de personajes como Leeuwenhoek, Koch o Pasteur, y sus esfuerzos por descubrir el origen de enfermedades endémicas, auténticas plagas en su tiempo.

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    15. No se como describirlo pero este libro se ha convertido en algo especial para mi, me encanta como esta redactado y creo que llego a mi vida en un momento bueno y bonito

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    16. He perdido la cuenta de las veces que he leído este libro. Tengo tres ediciones distintas, creo que necesito la edición en inglés XD

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    17. This a tough one for me to rank. The author has that wonderful chatty style so loved and familiar at the birth of the 20th century. It is a beautiful thing. Amusing. Descriptive. Honest. Where heroes have crackpot ideas as often as good ones and are often full-of-themselves or paranoid or manic-depressive or of dubious moral character. Of course, this *was* written in the early 20th century, and contains all of the social prejudices of that time. You'll see it right off ("ni**er in the woodpile" [...]

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    18. When there are weeks, months, and even years of diligent work with little if any revelations of progress, it is truly astounding that these researchers endured to make such great discoveries. Highly recommended for anyone going into research or interested in graduate school. Personally, the continuous struggles while researching microbes as a grad student at times can make me want to leave the lab and never go back, but this book reiterates what I’ve been lectured - the struggle is part of the [...]

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    19. This book belongs in every reader's education. Passionate, tumbling, full of the excitement and human cost of science, Paul de Kruif brings the scientists of infectious disease to life, foibles as well as intellect. Clear, perhaps simplistic, I cannot imagine a better introduction to the subject. More than that, I have re-read this volume countless times, including days when it was not in my plans, but I made the error of taking it off the shelf and being caught up in de Kruif's almost childlike [...]

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    20. so I have basically never written a review before. But this book is so good I just had to write one. It was given to me by a scientist and I didn't think much of it until I started reading it. I read it in one go. and although I enjoy reading non-fiction books they tend not to be books I can't put aside. This author somehow makes it seem as though he is just telling you a story, as if he is just beside you talking to you. This book encouraged me even more to go into medical research.I recommend [...]

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    21. Written in older style story form, this gave an enlightening overview of the advances in the study of microbes over the centuries. Crazy small stuff that affects our ability to survive on earth. Crazy that no one even knew they existed for so long. Illustrates how science is always gaining in knowledge and that it's never done. (And there's not a point where we should halt further examination, making ad hominem attacks rather than reexamining conclusions.) God's creations are incredible!

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    22. This was a "car book," something I read out loud to my husband as we travel distances, especially on our weekly trips to SF. It is about the early scientists who discovered microbes and bacteria and, sometimes, the way to combat the power of those microbes. The science part was fascinating. The writing was different. The book was written in 1926 and had a dramatic, even florid style, that sometimes (unintentionally, I'm sure) made us laugh out loud.

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    23. Este libro describe a los personajes clave en el tema de los inicios de la microbiología, sus experimentos, observaciones y razones que los llevaron a realizarlo. Cada aportación fue muy valiosa y modificó la manera en que el mundo percibía la realidad, especialmente aquella habitada por seres pequeñísimos con los que cohabitamos.

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    24. Interesante introducción a la historia de la microbiología. Escrita en tono divulgativo que entretiene y mantiene enganchada en su lectura. Me ha faltado las imágenes de algunos investigadores y algunas explicaciones detalladas de cómo procedían a elaborar ciertos materiales y herramientas.

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    25. Very entertaining history of the "microbe hunters" and their little beasties!

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    26. Lightly educational. Describes the lives and discoveries of the first microbiologists in the cutest way.

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    27. Written in an interesting style, but a good read nontheless

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    28. One of my favorite assigned books so far. A really easy way to learn about several microbe hunters in a story format.

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    29. Microbe Hunters was an interesting book. However I must say is only an introduction to the beginning of microbiology ideal for people that do not have any scientific background/education in the topic. My edition was from the 40’s so it was considerably older than the editions shown in . The prose and the way it was written were beautiful; it was a pleasant surprise to find out (as a non-native English speaker) that English can be written in such a way. I do not know if the newer editions conse [...]

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    30. A story of the discovery and research of microbes as known in 1926. The book is great in showing how real science happens. It describes the mind numbing effort of countless experiments done on the way to support the few moments of insight (more often guesses) to figure out how things work. Every chapter focuses on a main scientist who is never some bland geek in a lab coat but who is always a living, breathing, quirky, often cantankerous individual. The scientific establishment is also clearly n [...]

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