A Mother's Disgrace

  • Title: A Mother's Disgrace
  • Author: Robert Dessaix
  • ISBN: 9780207179341
  • Page: 284
  • Format: None
  • A Mother s Disgrace The frank and intimate journey of self discovery by author critic and arts commentator Robert Dessaix Confronting revealing and candid the book traces his life from adoption towards the end of Worl
    The frank and intimate journey of self discovery by author, critic and arts commentator Robert Dessaix Confronting, revealing and candid, the book traces his life from adoption towards the end of World War II, to a most unusual childhood on Sydney s North Shore, to his fascination with Russia and his time spent studying in Cold War Moscow, and to his years spent criss croThe frank and intimate journey of self discovery by author, critic and arts commentator Robert Dessaix Confronting, revealing and candid, the book traces his life from adoption towards the end of World War II, to a most unusual childhood on Sydney s North Shore, to his fascination with Russia and his time spent studying in Cold War Moscow, and to his years spent criss crossing the globe from Kashmir to Peru on various study trips But a life that might have been exciting to others, to Robert was empty at its core Constantly haunting him was the realisation that there was a shaft of silence running through his being the question of who his natural mother was and what his origins were A story of coming to terms with a new identity.

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      Published :2019-06-24T00:26:24+00:00

    About Robert Dessaix


    1. Robert Dessaix Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A Mother's Disgrace book, this is one of the most wanted Robert Dessaix author readers around the world.


    492 Comments


    1. A beautifully observed memoir, in which the author’s successful search for his biological mother serves as a framing device for other discoveries, principally of Russia and of his sexuality.Dessaix was adopted soon after birth and brought up in lower middle class Sydney as the much-loved only child of an older couple. Having studied Russian for many years, he first went to the Soviet Union in 1966. His chapter (“Mother Russia”) on that and subsequent sojourns is one of the best in the book [...]

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    2. Short, insightful memoir, beautifully written.

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    3. The poet Byron expressed the view that his writing derived from a painful intensification of self and the desire for relief from it. To withdraw himself from himself, to be relieved from what he saw as his "cursed selfishness," this was his sole, his entire, his "sincere motive in scribbling at all." While I find there is some truth in this explanation for the origins of my writing, there is so much more to it; indeed, my own raison d'etre for writing is quite complex. It is a subject I have gon [...]

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    4. Robert Dessaix was adopted at birth by a lower-middle class family on Sydney's lower North Shore, growing up in the kind of Protestant neighbourhood where "as you'll no doubt remember, neighbours formed clans, sang songs around each other's pianosquarrelled and cried on each other's shoulders. Unless, of course, you were Catholic, which was considered in extremely poor taste, like farting in a lift."A Mother's Disgrace weaves autobiography, internal and external inquiry together with such imperc [...]

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    5. I love Robert Dessaix, but I would have liked more about his mother and less about his thoughts about living in the USSR and other anecdotes (interesting though they are).

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    6. An excellent autobiography by an intelligent, but easy to read, writer who exposes his complex character with honesty and remarkable self-understanding.

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    7. (Bookclub book) Overall I enjoyed this book. Robert's narrative jumped a bit from place to place so a couple of times I thought please get on with it and bring the story together. At times he wrote at length on a topic which didn't seem to relate to the main topics of his adoption & homosexuality, but then at other times he wrote an almost throw away line in regards to these topics. When this happened I wanted him to expand and tell us more. The word 'disgrace' in the title is a harsh word a [...]

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    8. This was an interesting one. Dessaix had a lot of interesting things to say, many of which resonated with me - particularly his discussions on linguistics and the startling revelations he had regarding the nature of a person versus the way they were nurtured. It was a truly interesting book, and I can see why it's a modern classic; at the same time, there's absolutely no reason why this collection of fascinating essays had to be wrapped up and marketed as a memoir. My book club leader suggested [...]

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    9. I loved this very moving story of Robert Dessaix's decision to search for his birth mother, and her response to agree to be found and meet up with him. Such an amazing situation, and a very satisfactory outcome. It is such a descriptive piece of work in relation to how much each individual needs to know their blood relative in order to complete their own sense of who they are and where they have come from.

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    10. This book offers a rare insight, a little too complex for me, hard to picture the emotions, the motivation, and the end result of self discovery. Robert probably needed to write this book for some closure, although it is hard to say what this will achieve. I did like the ending about coincidences and randomness.

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    11. A fairly interesting read. Quite enjoyed it, especially his adventures in Moscow, although I found myself not caring very much about his other mother (the book is all about leaving behind his adopted family and finding his birth parents, and the new identity which this brought for him).

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    12. Beautifully written like all of Robert Dessaix's work, and very moving.

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    13. Frank, perhaps, intimate, maybed a little narcissistic? I suppose all autobiographical works are. However I didn't really see the point of this one.

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