Vaclav Havel: Or Living in Truth

  • Title: Vaclav Havel: Or Living in Truth
  • Author: Václav Havel
  • ISBN: 9780317540536
  • Page: 134
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Vaclav Havel Or Living in Truth Contents pt Six texts by V clav Havel Letter to Dr Gust v Hus k The power of the powerless Six asides about culture Politics and conscience Thriller An anatomy of reticence pt Sixteen texts for V
    Contents pt 1 Six texts by V clav Havel Letter to Dr Gust v Hus k The power of the powerless Six asides about culture Politics and conscience Thriller An anatomy of reticence pt 2 Sixteen texts for V clav Havel Catastrophe Samuel Beckett Courtesy towards God Heinrich B ll Prague a poem, not disappearing Timothy Garton Ash Ex prophets andContents pt 1 Six texts by V clav Havel Letter to Dr Gust v Hus k The power of the powerless Six asides about culture Politics and conscience Thriller An anatomy of reticence pt 2 Sixteen texts for V clav Havel Catastrophe Samuel Beckett Courtesy towards God Heinrich B ll Prague a poem, not disappearing Timothy Garton Ash Ex prophets and storysellers Ji Gru a From Variations and reflections on topics in V clav Havel s prison letters Ladislav Hejd nek Citizen versus state Harry J rv The chaste centaur Pavel Kohout Conversations 36 Iva Kotral Candide had to be destroyed Milan Kundera I think about you a great deal Arthur Miller When I was still living in Prague Zdena Salivarov The sorrowful satisfaction of the powerless Milan ime ka I saw V clav Havel for the last time Josef kvoreck Introduction to The memorandum Tom Stoppard Letter to a prisoner Zden k Urb nek On the house Lukv k Vacul k.

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      Published :2020-01-23T03:10:22+00:00

    About Václav Havel


    1. V clav Havel was a Czech playwright, essayist, poet, dissident and politician He was the tenth and last President of Czechoslovakia 1989 92 and the first President of the Czech Republic 1993 2003 He wrote over twenty plays and numerous non fiction works, translated internationally He received the US Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Philadelphia Liberty Medal, the Order of Canada, the freedom medal of the Four Freedoms Award, and the Ambassador of Conscience Award He was also voted 4th in Prospect Magazine s 2005 global poll of the world s top 100 intellectuals He was a founding signatory of the Prague Declaration on European Conscience and Communism.Beginning in the 1960s, his work turned to focus on the politics of Czechoslovakia After the Prague Spring, he became increasingly active In 1977, his involvement with the human rights manifesto Charter 77 brought him international fame as the leader of the opposition in Czechoslovakia it also led to his imprisonment The 1989 Velvet Revolution launched Havel into the presidency In this role he led Czechoslovakia and later the Czech Republic to multi party democracy His thirteen years in office saw radical change in his nation, including its split with Slovakia, which Havel opposed, its accession into NATO and start of the negotiations for membership in the European Union, which was attained in 2004.


    939 Comments


    1. I got so angry at the dearth of media coverage after Havel's death (and more specifically at the depth of coverage given to a much more wicked man) that I went through my library looking for what of his writings I owned when I came across this volume. I forget where I bought it originally, no doubt from a used bookstore somewhere, and it had gathered more dust on my own shelves with only one lone bookmark 30 pages in where no doubt I had started reading and then got distracted by something else. [...]

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    2. A must-read for surviving a totalitarian regime or, if we're lucky, avoiding one. Havel's voice is beautiful. He writes with humility and uncompromising integrity on the importance of maintaining one's principles and dignity despite oppression. He stresses the need to avoid labels like “dissident,” declaring them meaningless and easily twisted; he calls instead for living honorable goals, for speaking truth and speaking out, defining yourself in affirmative terms instead of anti-tyranny.Ever [...]

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    3. During the darkest of times within the Czech Republic, the country in whole was guided by the brightest of lights. Václav Havel was able to relate to the simplest of man and the highest of scholars and uniting them in hopes of creating something out of a the barren land the communists had stripped bare. Havel's essays throughout Living in Truth, are inspiring, they show insight through one of this worlds greatest visionaries perspective, humble yet so passionate about the country he so desperat [...]

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    4. This is a series of essays about personal honesty and life in a totalitarian state (Czechoslovakia under Communism).What optimism and belief in humanity to predict that Communism had to pass!"Vitality cannot be suppressed forever. A secret streamlet trickles on beneath the heavy crust of inertia and bureaucratic pseudo-events, slowly undermining it. It may take a long time, but one day it must happen. The ice can no longer hold and begins to crack."

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    5. While the overall quality of this collection is somewhat patchy in places, I'd strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in politics and society, in the Eastern bloc, in political systems and culture simply on the power of Havel's Letter to Dr Husák and The Power of the Powerless, both of which are published in this volume. They are by far the strongest pieces in this collection, compelling and elegantly written, and I'd definitely label them as a 'must-read.'Havel's other essays publis [...]

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    6. I admit that I didn't have time to read the full text before I had to send the book back to the library, but the excerpts that I flicked through - both Havel's own writing in Part 1 and the pieces written to/for him in Part 2 (including Samuel Beckett's 'Catastrophe', Arthur Miller's 'I Think About You A Great Deal' and Milan Kundera 'Candide Had To Be Destroyed') I found thoroughly thought-provoking and a good insight into Czech culture and psyche.

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    7. Quote:[the ethical work] offers a ready answer to any question whatsoever. It can scarcely beaccepted only in part, and accepting it has profound implications for human life . . . allone has to do is accept it, and suddenly everything becomes clear once more, life takeson new meaning, and all mysteries, unanswered questions, anxiety, and loneliness vanish. . . . (Havel, Living in Truth, 1983: 38–39).

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    8. "The Power of the Powerless" is worth reading alone, but Havel's musings on being a dissident, the importance of culture, and the stories about Havel from people as diverse as Arthur Miller and Milan Kundera make this book worth reading.

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    9. I picked up this book to read Havel's essay "The Power of the Powerless", written in 1978. I recommend it.

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    10. I guess this was supposed to speak to me but as a pampered east-west digerati, I'm probably just too far removed from the perspective.

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