Marathon Woman: Running the Race to Revolutionize Women's Sports

  • Title: Marathon Woman: Running the Race to Revolutionize Women's Sports
  • Author: Kathrine Switzer
  • ISBN: 9780786719679
  • Page: 305
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Marathon Woman Running the Race to Revolutionize Women s Sports Katherine Switzer ran the Boston Marathon in where she was attacked by one of the event s directors who wanted to eject her from the all male race She fought off the director and finished the rac
    Katherine Switzer ran the Boston Marathon in 1967 where she was attacked by one of the event s directors who wanted to eject her from the all male race She fought off the director and finished the race From the childhood events that inspired her to winning the New York City Marathon in 1974, this liberally illustrated book details the struggles and achievements of a pionKatherine Switzer ran the Boston Marathon in 1967 where she was attacked by one of the event s directors who wanted to eject her from the all male race She fought off the director and finished the race From the childhood events that inspired her to winning the New York City Marathon in 1974, this liberally illustrated book details the struggles and achievements of a pioneering women in sports.

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      Published :2019-04-22T13:20:49+00:00

    About Kathrine Switzer


    1. Kathrine Switzer is the first woman to run the Boston Marathon as a numbered entry She entered and completed the race in 1967, five years before women were officially allowed to compete in it.


    303 Comments


    1. I’m spoiled. I began running when I was a teenager, and have always taken it for granted as there for me when I need to relieve stress, boost my self-esteem (any day can be a good day if you got a great run in!), burn calories, get some quiet, get some fresh air, think, etc. I get frustrated at the occasional sexism obstacles I encounter in the MMA world – but after reading Marathon Woman I’m painfully aware of how minuscule these problems are. It was shocking, inspiring, empowering, and h [...]

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    2. Wow! This was an unexpected page-turner. Kathrine Switzer was the second woman to run the Boston Marathon. In 1967, she checked the rules and found nothing explicitly preventing a woman from running, but, just in case, she signed up as K.V. Switzer. At mile-four a race official ran onto the course and tried to drag her off. Her boyfriend at the time shoved the offical aside and Switzer and her running friends took off. A photographer captured the incident. Switzer finished the race. The photos l [...]

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    3. Marathoning had always been a sport for men until Kathrine Switzer. In Marathon Woman, she details the challenges she faced while trying to popularize the woman's marathon. Switzer's passion for running exceeds her drive to support woman's running, and through this book she is able to illustrate just how important running has been in her life. She tells an honest and hilarious story of how she was able to get her foot into the door of running, and spread the woman's marathon throughout the world [...]

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    4. Despite being a sports writer, I don't have a lot of patience for sports books. This is one of the exceptions. Switzer was one of the first women to run in the then-all male Boston Marathon. She is a writer who became an athlete and running advocate (not a jock who became a writer) so her story telling is interesting and compelling. She throws in enough aspects of her personal life to make you sympathetic to her story but with just enough detail to keep it from being a tell-all. You have to be i [...]

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    5. Sadly, this was so poorly written, it was hard to follow at some points. Switzer really needed a good editor. I'm not entirely sure what her point was in this book either. Was it to brag about her own running journey (she does a lot of that)? Describe the path to the women's Olympic marathon (if so, she took a roundabout route for that)? Tell her life story (maybe)? Ultimately, it was disappointing.

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    6. This is Kathrine Switzer's memoir of her running career and her quest to make the women's marathon an Olympic event. She frankly admits she never considered herself a gifted runner. She just liked it and through vigorous training became an elite runner. She's the first woman who officially ran the Boston Marathon in 1967. Women had been running the marathon distance (26.2 miles) since the 1930's but had to jump out of the bushes at the start of the race. Kathrine didn't see a "men only" statemen [...]

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    7. The author's tone, below average writing skills, and generalized disparaging remarks about women (as compared to herself) made me take a break from this book. I'll just give a review while I am still on p. 236:This woman was a revolutionary in women's sports. I admire her for it AND others like her. She writes, at times, like she was the only woman who trained and ran like she did. She presents evidence to the contrary, but she continues throughout much of the book to paint a picture of herself [...]

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    8. I was expecting this to be the story of how and why Kathrine Switzer ran the Boston Marathon in 1967 and the fallout from being the first woman to do so "officially." What I was not expecting was that was just the beginning of the story. Switzer was a key figure in getting women's distance running (and specifically marathoning) accepted by The Powers That Be, and *that's* the story she tells in this book. Highly recommended.

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    9. I've been inspired by the infamous photos of K. Switzer and Jock Semple for ages and I enjoyed reading the story that led up to, and unfolded after, that event. If you're a runner, or a woman, you'll enjoy it. It was interesting to read about the evolution of the marathon from a time when races were small affairs where most people knew each other to the later years of corporate sponsorship and promotion, and beyond.

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    10. such a long way women have come in the last 40 years - sad to know we still have a long way to go -- Not in the running arena (according to Kathrine) but in many aspects of this society. Good to know that our daughters are reading of the activities of those of our generation and the struggles to get to the freedom our daughters enjoy today.

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    11. Absolutely LOVED this book. Loved learning about the start of women's running, both with Kathrine's own story and those of other women in the 70s. Such and interesting time and topic. Absolutely loved it.

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    12. I loved this inspired me so much (I ended up running my first marathon a year or so after reading it).

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    13. This is one tough woman! And a good memoir writer, too. She wasn't afraid to talk of "women things" like periods or tears, either. Describing the 1971 Boston Marathon:The women at Wellesley at last were all I had hoped for, and more. In 1967 they were nonexistent, and in 1970, also a cold and miserable rain, they were scarce. Today they were out in force and went absolutely crazy when they saw me. For the first time, I felt the noise of their screaming bounce off my chest; the only time I'd felt [...]

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    14. i loved getting switzer's full, gossipy, lively story. she's got a way with narrative, and i was surprised and delighted when she didn't withhold details that really brought the story to life. at one point, she very dryly, "what? there's nothing to see here. i'm not implying anything"-ly mentions -- it's totally off-hand! -- that the man who became her first ex-husband had very, very tiny feet. i guffaw-laughed. and she slipped this in without sounding bitter and catty throughout the rest of the [...]

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    15. “I could tell that feminism had arrived, at last, at Wellesley. For when the women saw me the cheers became screams and wails and even some aggressive shouts of ‘Come on, sister! Do it! Do it! DO IT!”I take for granted that I’ve had these words of encouragement ringing in my ears since birth. I thought reading this book while training for my 4th and 5th marathons would be a good way to get through the upcoming week of monster millage, and I was not wrong. While not particularly well writ [...]

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    16. 50 years ago women were not allowed to participate in marathons due to several pseudo scientific arguments (such as the uterus being at risk of falling out) and a general fear that a female doing too much exercise will become manly and unattractive to the opposite sex. The book follows Katrine Switzer as she finds her so-called "secret weapon" (running) which gives her confidence and strength. And we get the story behind the iconic pictures from the Boston Marathon of 1967, in which she is physi [...]

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    17. I was astonished reading this book. I’d heard of Kathrine Switzer but probably only as the person who entered the all male Boston Marathon when officials tried to stop her but getting barged out the way by her running companions.As a woman and as a runner I was Shocked to read that it wasn’t considered “safe” by official athletics bodies for women to run long distances in the 1960’s and into the 1970’s. Jeez - women’s sports may have a long way to go but at least we have women like [...]

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    18. This book is amazing!. If you are a marathone woman (or even a man!) you will find this book fascinating. Many of us have seen that photo pushing off Kathrine Switzer, the author, by the Boston's Marathon race Director in 1967. However, there were a lot of job after that because Kathrine had a personal goal in her mind: women's olympic Marathon. This book is about it: the victory of the women in the sport field. Women got olympic marathoners in Los Angeles 1984 since 33 years ago!!.just 33 years [...]

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    19. Inspiring behind-the-scenes autobiography of the infamous K. Switzer. The only part that left a bad taste in my mouth was when she was describing the tears that came to her eyes when she saw so many Japanese women taking part in the race she directed in Tokyo - given that, in her words: foot binding only ended as a practice in Japan in 1908. For someone who says, literally, in the book that she always tried to assimilate to and respect the cultures of the countries she was visiting, she (and her [...]

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    20. This was a re-read for meRead it several years ago, and wanted to reread as I am considering training for a marathon. We'll see. Anyway, this story is very inspirational in so many ways. On the one hand, Kathrine Switzer was such a superhero by running in the Boston Marathon in 1967 and then training to become a serious athlete. On the other hand, she shares parts of her life that show how human she is (staying in relationships when many of us would split). I love how supportive she is of all wo [...]

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    21. Not the type of book I would commonly read - I mean I read a lot of biographies but not sports related. I was intrigued because of something I saw or heard last year on the 50th anniversary of that first Boston Marathon where a woman wore a number (Go K!) and because my sister-in-law has run the marathon. It was quite an interesting and inspiring story and made me (ha! me!) actually consider the idea of running.

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    22. This is a five star book if there ever was one. Inspirational story of how Kathrine Switzer almost singlehandedly advanced women's running both by her personal example and by her untiring efforts to draw more women into the sport leading to inclusion of the women's marathon in the Olympic Games. Must reading for any serious long distance runner.

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    23. I LOVED this book. If you are a runner or advocate of women's sports, then you need to read this book. Kathrine Switzer inspired me to run my first marathon this fall. I know when I'm out on my long runs, I'll be thinking of Kathrine and trying to channel a smidge of her strength. Read it! You won't be disappointed.

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    24. Inspiring and motivating, makes you want to get out the door more and run your heart out. After reading this book you wil not take that for granted anymore and realize what a struggle this has been. A mustread, especially for every female runner. I loved it!

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    25. I listened to this on audiobook and it was read by the author, which I really enjoyed. Wonderfully and compellingly told. As someone who has been running for 23 years, since I was 13, it made me appreciate the work that went into making women’s running a part of everyday life. Thank you, Kathrine!

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    26. Amazing, inspiring, emotional. This is a must read for runners, especially those tackling the marathon.

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    27. 3.5 stars. Switzer is a decent writer and the story is an interesting one, but you have to be really, really interested in women's running to make it through 400 pages

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    28. great book. . even for people lime me who don't run! Kinda makes me want to. . .but not really!

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    29. An inspiring book: about running and about going after what you want! Can't help but feel thankful for Kathrine Switzer!

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    30. I had no idea how much Kathrine worked to bring running to women. Very interesting read.

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