Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years

  • Title: Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years
  • Author: David Talbot
  • ISBN: 9781847391056
  • Page: 356
  • Format: Paperback
  • Brothers The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years Robert F Kennedy was the first conspiracy theorist about his brother s murder In this new account of the Kennedy years David Talbot explains why even on November RFK had reason to believe tha
    Robert F Kennedy was the first conspiracy theorist about his brother s murder In this new account of the Kennedy years, David Talbot explains why even on 22 November 1963 RFK had reason to believe that dark forces were at work in Dallas.

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      356 David Talbot
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      Posted by:David Talbot
      Published :2019-07-08T10:47:44+00:00

    About David Talbot


    1. David Talbot is an American progressive journalist, author and media executive He is the founder, former CEO and editor in chief, an early web magazine, Salon Talbot founded Salon in 1995 The magazine gained a large following and broke several major national stories It was described by Entertainment Weekly as one of the Net s few genuine must reads.Since leaving Salon, Talbot has researched and written on the Kennedy assassination and other areas of what he calls hidden history Talbot has worked as a senior editor for Mother Jones magazine and a features editor for The San Francisco Examiner, and has written for Time magazine, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, and other publications.Talbot was born and raised in Los Angeles, California He attended Harvard Boys School, but did not graduate after falling afoul of the school s headmaster and ROTC program during the Vietnam War After graduating from the University of California at Santa Cruz, he returned to Los Angeles, where he wrote a history of the Hollywood Left, Creative Differences , and freelanced for Crawdaddy, Rolling Stone, and other magazines He later was hired by Environmental Action Foundation in Washington, D.C to write Power and Light, a book about the politics of energy After he returned to California, he was hired as an editor at Mother Jones magazine, and later, by San Francisco Examiner publisher Will Hearst to edit the newspaper s Sunday magazine, Image It was at the Examiner where Talbot developed the idea for Salon, convincing several of his newspaper colleagues to join him and jump ship into the brave new world of web publishing.


    170 Comments


    1. Of the dozens of books I've read on the Kennedys, David Talbot's research stands out as the most insightful and original in breaking new ground. He introduces unknown and, indeed, "hidden" information on the Kennedy brothers and the Kennedy presidency and administration. I learned of incidents that I had not found discussed in other resources. The history, which Talbot covers in gripping language and detail, truly captures the essence of secretive events. The accounts and encounters Talbot relay [...]

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    2. This book has 3 major sections. It begins with convincing analysis of the motivations of the Mafia, CIA and anti-Castro Cubans. The next part focuses on RFK, his response to his brother's assassination and his subsequent career. The last part describes and discusses the cover up. Talbot doesn't get into the theories of the bullets, the capture of Oswald, shady life of Ruby, etc. The author is not out to prove one theory or another.The book shows RFK was successful in mafia prosecutions and was m [...]

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    3. This is a well-documented, heavily researched book that looks into what the Kennedy Years were really like in this country between JFK's election to the Presidency in 1960 and the assassination of his brother, Robert Kennedy, in June 1968. Though I was born several months after President Kennedy's assassination, I have had an interest in his life and political career since I was a child. And in subsequent years as my knowledge of President Kennedy's life and presidency has grown and deepened, I [...]

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    4. Great book! If you are reading this review, and you have not read David Talbot's 'Brothers', then I strongly recommend that you get hold of a copy. It is of no consequence even if you are, like me, not American. This 'Hidden History of the Kennedy Years' is everyone's history, for every nationality, for every generation.My own personal belief, that has grown stronger with the years is President John Kennedy saved my life.As a snotty nosed English kid aged nine years old he was my hero after the [...]

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    5. Aint no two, three of four ways about it. The American military Industrial complex pumped bullets into President John F. Kennedy, splattering his brains all over his wife.Then, when his brother Bobby( who wanted to be president in large part to find out who killed his brother) got close to winning, they killed him too.Oh and they killed a few of Kennedy's girl friends along the way because they had too much influence on him.This book is well researched, well written by a noted writer

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    6. This is a very very good book, insightful, thought-provoking, interesting and very moving. I found myself in tears at more than a few points. It's about Jack and Bobby Kennedy and their relationship throughout 'the Kennedy years'.History seems to have sidelined Bobby and his murder over the years - the attention has always been on JFK and his assassination - but the way this book looked at Bobby broke my heart. Because Jack was his whole world, his primary focus - and when Jack was murdered Bobb [...]

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    7. This book is both a biography of the Kennedy brothers, John and Robert, from 1961 until 1968, and a review of their assassinations and the controversies surrounding them. Along the way the author, a believer in a conspiracy linking both murders, documents how RFK himself subscribed to such beliefs as regards the events of 22 November, 1963.Author David Talbot is also a believer in the Kennedy brothers themselves. Although he deals briefly with the promiscuity of the elder, even mentioning rumors [...]

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    8. A fascinating book about the Kennedys that includes a hair-raising picture of the inner workings of the American government during the cold war, barely controlled generals pushing for nuclear war, a CIA answerable to no one. A great strength of this book is how it isn't framed as an argument for a particular conspiracy theory; instead it argues that the Warren report was an insulting failure to seriously investigate what happened, that the CIA lied to and successfully stonewalled generations of [...]

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    9. This book lets the reader know about the political climate of the 60s which forced the Kennedy brothers into decisions they didnt want to make and some that they did. They wanted the US to get past the Cold War fear that the military and CIA wanted us to feel. Lots of JFK's speeches leading up to VietNam are pertinent today. I only wish we were still trying to be a peaceful nation which is what Kennedy wanted more than anything else. Thats why he made such strides in getting along with Khruschev [...]

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    10. Best book I've read this year. Sheds much light on what the Kennedy brothers were truly about and what they attempted to do. If Bobby would have lived, I reckon he would have been greater than his brother. He was truly an ember in the ashes. Highly recommended! I'll write a proper review soon.

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    11. I bought this book quite a long time ago and it’s taken me a few years to read: discovering – after I took the book home – that the book dabbled with conspiracy theories about JFKs assassination in November 1963 did rather put me off for a long time. After all, conspiracy theories about the President’s murder always had something of the air of a media circus about them and my sense was that most serious people accepted that the crime was committed by the lost and erratic Lee Harvey Oswal [...]

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    12. Beyond reading summaries and a few critiques of the Warren Commission report when it was first issued, I had never delved deeply into the speculation about who really killed John F. Kennedy, and, later, Robert F. Kennedy. David Talbot's wide-ranging book offers an insightful way to revisit and catch up on the awful events. He provides no conclusive answers but leans heavily toward a suspicion that the JFK plot involved either CIA agents, anti-Castro Cuban immigrants or the Mafia, or perhaps an a [...]

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    13. Very well researched book covering Jack Kennedy's presidency, as well as the years afterwards leading up until Bobby Kennedy's run for the Senate. Also, covers Bobby's subsequent '68 Presidential campaign. There were a lot of things that I liked about this book. I will start with those. I learned a lot of things that occurred during Jack's term as POTUS, events in and around the Cuban Missile Crisis that the press never reported, and the entire take down Castro thing. I had already read much abo [...]

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    14. This book will convince most skeptical readers that there was a conspiracy behind the assassination of President Kennedy. Different readers might come to different conclusions about who was behind the assassination (other than Oswald), but the author lays out a complex web of things that are too many and too connected to be coincidence. Adding credence to the author's claims is the fact that reputable mainstream researchers have recently exposed the gaping holes and unexamined areas in the Warre [...]

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    15. This book wasn't what I expected it to be and it took me a long time to figure that out. From what I read of this title before buying it, I assumed it was an account of the JFK assassination through the eyes of Bobby Kennedy. Instead it was basically just a retelling of the Kennedy years. It was well-written and enjoyable, it just wasn't what I was looking for. One of the big questions the book asked was, "Why didn't RFK uses his position and power to solve the JFK assassination?" Instead of an [...]

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    16. This book made go back to one of my favourite periods of US politics and characters as well. Very well written and very well researched in my opinion (not being an expert on the subject but having read many books on the matter I say that). The book recounts the origins of the Kennedy family and the developments that took John to the White House and Robert to the State Department as well as the implications of them taking sides during those years in reference to diverse groups of power. Of course [...]

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    17. This is a unique look at the Kennedys from within the Kennedy camp. We witness the major events of our era through the eyes of Robert Kennedy and the close-knit "band of brothers."While this book doesn't settle the issue of the John Kennedy Assassination, it establishes who the Kennedy clan and its allies felt was responsible. RFK firmly believed "they" killed his brother. Whatever the reader's opinion of the event, it is interesting to view RFK's life and career as products of that belief.I was [...]

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    18. Begins on Nov 22nd with the compelling story of Bobby Kennedy on the day of his brother's death trying to find out more information about a possible conspiracy,making phone calls to the FBI,CIA,other officials.Even though well researched and documented,ultimately, I was disappointed with the booke "usual suspects" take the blame for JFK's death.Was it the mafia?or the CIA? or possibly some anti-Catro exiles? the final answer is there is no defintive answer but lots of interesting speculation.

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    19. Anyone interested in a well researched account of the Kennedy assassinations, the relationship between JFK and RFK, and the inner workings of our government should read this book. After reading it, I am convinced that that both JFK and RFK were extraordinary, though flawed men, whose murders were never truly solved.

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    20. A great account of the relationship between RFK and JFK and the formidable role the former played in the Kennedy White House. The book is full of anecdotes and fabulously depicts the political climate of the 60s.

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    21. I cannot imagine a more valuable book about American leadership in the second half of the 20th Century. The assassination of John F. Kennedy was the nightmare event of my childhood. I approach such material warily, because of the number of books already written and because the subject is tender to my heart.However, this is not merely a book about the Kennedy assassinations. This is a story about how two brothers strove mightily to bring a different kind of politics and a different world view to [...]

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    22. Not sure what I was expecting but,e good news is that I found this book to be a better read than, "The Devil's Chessboard", by the same author.The good: David Talbot brings to light more of the brother to brother relationship of Robert and Jack Kennedy. The best parts focus on Bobby. You will read a few nuggets of info not often discussed elsewhere. These mostly bring to light Bobby's eccentric, powerful personality when he was in office helping out Jack, as his tough right hand. This contrasts [...]

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    23. David Talbot does a fine job of compiling a wide variety of sourced material in his summary of the Kennedy administration and the investigation into the deaths of JFK and RFK. I learned much about the Bay of Pigs incident and the Cuban Missile Crisis, and for that alone, it is a worthy read. Talbot's revelations into the many people who may (or may not) have influenced or supported Lee Harvey Oswald were carefully supported, and qualified where it is appropriate. As much respect as I have for Ea [...]

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    24. Nothing to see here. Just another Ad Nauseam book about how the Kennedy brothers were holier than thou, and the CIA killed them. This is just as worse as the author's second book maintaining that Allen Dulles was behind the assassination. Pure fodder for the assassination people who let their emotions control their judgments. Watch JFK instead. At least, it is shorter than reading this.

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    25. I enjoy a thoroughly researched book as much as any historian, but this one took me weeks to read, or at least they felt like weeks. I lost interest about a third of the way through, but kept plugging away at it. There are some interesting insights in it, I'll grant the author that.

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    26. BrothersA most interesting book. I learned more on the Kennedy brothers relationship than the last 5 books I've read. A must read.

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    27. A great resource on the Kennedy administration and possible actors in the assassination. Very readable.

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    28. This, I feel is one of the better books looking back on the brothers who hold such an important, if short, role in American history.

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    29. Loved this book, so much I didn't want it to end.

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    30. Rambling Author sends the reader down a rabbit hole of slush. I thought the narrator nodded off a few times. I applaud the author’s passion Merits the second star

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