Panorama (Peter Owen World Series: Slovenia)

  • Title: Panorama (Peter Owen World Series: Slovenia)
  • Author: Dušan Šarotar Rawley Grau
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 355
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Panorama Peter Owen World Series Slovenia Part journalism part travelogue part fiction Panorama is one of the most daring and original literary works of In Panorama Dusan Sarotar takes the reader on a deeply reflective yet kaleidoscop
    Part journalism, part travelogue, part fiction, Panorama is one of the most daring and original literary works of 2016 In Panorama Dusan Sarotar takes the reader on a deeply reflective yet kaleidoscopic journey from northern to southern Europe In a manner reminiscent of W.G Sebald, Sarotar supplements the narrative with photographs, which help to blur the lines betweenPart journalism, part travelogue, part fiction, Panorama is one of the most daring and original literary works of 2016.In Panorama Dusan Sarotar takes the reader on a deeply reflective yet kaleidoscopic journey from northern to southern Europe In a manner reminiscent of W.G Sebald, Sarotar supplements the narrative with photographs, which help to blur the lines between fiction and journalism The writers experience of landscape is bound up in a personal yet elusive search for self discovery, as he and a diverse group of international fellow exiles relate in their individual and distinctive voices their unique stories and their common quest for somewhere they might call home Along with Three Loves, One Death by Evald Flisar and None Like Her by Jela Krecic, Panorama is part of the three book World Series from Peter Owen Publishers and Istros Books Each series brings to light the vibrant and innovative fiction produced in a featured country, offering readers the very best literature in translation.

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      355 Dušan Šarotar Rawley Grau
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      Posted by:Dušan Šarotar Rawley Grau
      Published :2019-03-07T00:52:21+00:00

    About Dušan Šarotar Rawley Grau


    1. Slovenija , rojen 1968 Je pisatelj, pesnik, scenarist,urednik na tudentski zalo bi in urednikliterarne revije AirBeletrina airbeletrina Na doma iji Mi ka Kranjca v VelikiPolani organizira literarne ve ere Je avtor estihdokumentarnih filmov pri RTV Slovenija.Napisal je romana Potapljanje na dah 1999 in No itev z zajtrkom 2003, tudi scenarij zafilm , zbirko kratkih zgodb Mrtvi kot 2002 ter pesni ko zbirko Ob utek za veter 2004.Njegove zgodbe in pesmi so prevedene v ve jezikov.


    828 Comments


    1. Words were rolling like multi-coloured marbles, the glass eyes scurrying away, hiding beneath the table, ducking out of sight for a moment as if waiting for inspiration, then taking off again; I felt that if I could freeze them, at least for a second, could read their placement in the room, I’d be able to capture the thought, the long sentence that was both hiding and revealing itself to me in seemingly random images.[]I was full of sensations, baffling impressions that pushed their way into m [...]

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    2. Ever been driving your car while you daydream or worry about an appointment up ahead? Then, suddenly, something on the road (a tailgater, a car pulling out in front of you) snaps you back to the here and now, scaring all hell out of you because you wonder how it is you were driving a car on "automatic pilot" for the past five minutes? You try to reassure yourself by recalling something from the past few minutes, but no. Nothing. In fact, you WERE driving this dangerous piece of hurtling metal de [...]

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    3. This is an atmospheric, densely written landscape of words. Rather than chapters or even sections, I would say this book is divided into portions, some large, some small, most narrating conversations of the author’s friends and acquaintances, together with some introspective remembrances by the author himself. The result is, indeed, a panorama on our (mankind’s) relationships - to our physical environment, country and culture, family and friends, out past and our present. Despite the first p [...]

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    4. I received an ARC from the publisher.Fiction, poetry, travelogue, history, short story, memoir, photo essay. Šarotar’s latest work, translated into English from Slovenian for Istros Books as part of their World Series venture with Peter Owens Publishers, defines categorization into a single, specific genre. The unnamed narrator, whose own biography resembles that of Šarotar himself, opens this piece with a poetic description of his journey through the landscapes he encounters while in Irelan [...]

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    5. With a nod to the work of WG Sebald, Sarotar orchestrates a powerful meditation on language, landscape, loss, identity ad the migrant experience. My full, detailed critical review and a link to an excerpt, is published at Numéro Cinq: numerocinqmagazine/2016/11

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    6. It’s tempting — and partly right — to think of the Slovenian writer Dušan Šarotar as a modernized W.G. Sebald, as a restless, observant wanderer equipped with a streak of melancholy and a notebook, but also with a tablet and a smart phone. Šarotar’s "Panorama: A Narrative About the Course of Events" is written in extended sentences that can meander for pages, weaving around the many black-and-white photographs he embeds in his text. The book’s narrator, who is surely based on Šarot [...]

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    7. This story wandered in and out of focus for me. There were moments in which I was not sure what was going on, out of time and place, unsure who was narrating -- was it the main character, or one of the many people they talked to in their travels? I say they because I'm not really sure of anything regarding the main character -- perhaps I should assume he, but that doesn't feel sure. There were other moments in which something snapped into place and hit me hard: loss, identity, injustice, guilt. [...]

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    8. Sebald light but worth reading for the poetic sublimation of exile and loss into landscape

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    9. Dense, intricate, superb. (esp. if one has run out of Sebald to read)

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    10. Too contrived, overwrought.

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    11. "Brilliantly evocative black-and-white photos by the author trace the text’s moods, showing—among other, perhaps happier scenes of people and buildings beautiful in themselves—also the pocked, eviscerating shoreline, the intransigence of water and floods, walls and crashes, and an ephemeral present, redolent with displacement and statelessness, waiting and mourning. Evocation of these states is this book’s main achievement." - Andrew SingerThis book was reviewed in the March/April 2017 i [...]

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    12. Thank you Net Galley for the free ARC.This book is written in beautiful language. It is like the writer is meditating about the landscape he is in. He describes the setting around Galway, Ireland, the rugged coast, the graveyards and the memorial about men gone down with the sea. I wish the photos were more than just black and white snapshots, they are supporting the story, but they are plain photos, nothing special or artistic.

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