Dreams

  • Title: Dreams
  • Author: Olive Schreiner
  • ISBN: 9781406945546
  • Page: 127
  • Format: Paperback
  • Dreams This is the second book by Schreiner South African author and feminist who is best remembered for her novel The Story of an African Farm It contains eleven short stories based on Schreiner s d
    1924 This is the second book by Schreiner, South African author and feminist, who is best remembered for her novel, The Story of an African Farm It contains eleven short stories based on Schreiner s dreams and life on a farm in South Africa See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

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      127 Olive Schreiner
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      Posted by:Olive Schreiner
      Published :2019-04-09T13:17:34+00:00

    About Olive Schreiner


    1. Olive Schreiner 24 March 1855 December 11, 1920 , was a South African author, pacifist and political activist She is best known for her novel The Story of an African Farm, which has been acclaimed for the manner it tackled the issues of its day, ranging from agnosticism to the treatment of women.From Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner 1855 1920 was named after her three older brothers, Oliver 1848 1854 , Albert 1843 1843 and Emile 1852 1852 , who died before she was born She was the ninth of twelve children born to a missionary couple, Gottlob Schreiner and Rebecca Lyndall at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa Her childhood was a harsh one her father was loving and gentle, though unpractical but her mother Rebecca was intent on teaching her children the same restraint and self discipline that had been a part of her upbringing Olive received virtually all her initial education from her mother who was well read and gifted clarification needed Her eldest brother Fred 1840 1901 was educated in England and became headmaster of a school in Eastbourne.When Olive was six, Gottlob transferred to Healdtown in the Eastern Cape to run the Wesleyan training institute there As with so many of his other projects, he simply was not up to the task and was expelled in disgrace for trading against missionary regulations He was forced to make his own living for the first time in his life, and tried a business venture Again, he failed and was insolvent within a year The family lived in abject poverty as a result.However, Olive was not to remain with her parents for long When her older brother Theophilus 1844 1920 was appointed headmaster in Cradock in 1867, she went to live with him along with two of her siblings She also attended his school and received a formal education for the first time Despite that, she was no happier in Cradock than she had been in Wittebergen or Healdtown Her siblings were very religious, but Olive had already rejected the Christianity of her parents as baseless and it was the cause of many arguments with her family.Therefore, when Theo and her brother left Cradock for the diamond fields of Griqualand West, Olive chose to become a governess On the way to her first post at Barkly East, she met Willie Bertram, who shared her views of religion and who lent her a copy of Herbert Spencer s First Principles This text was to have a profound impact on her While rejecting religious creeds and doctrine, Spencer also argued for a belief in an Absolute that lay beyond the scope of human knowledge and conception This belief was founded in the unity of nature and a teleological universe, both of which Olive was to appropriate for herself in her attempts to create a morality free of organized religion.After this meeting, Olive travelled from place to place, accepting posts as a governess with various families and leaving them because of the sexual predation of her male employers in many cases During this time she met Julius Gau, to whom she became engaged under doubtful circumstances For whatever reason, their engagement did not last long and she returned to live with her parents and then with her brothers She read widely and began writing seriously She started Undine at this time.However, her brothers financial situation soon deteriorated, as diamonds became increasingly difficult to find Olive had no choice but to resume her transient lifestyle, moving between various households and towns, until she returned briefly to her parents in 1874 It was there that she had the first of the asthma attacks that would plague her for the rest of her life Since her parents were no financially secure than before and because of her ill health, Olive was forced to resume working in order to support them.


    328 Comments


    1. This book carried me through my 20s. It is a book of parables that awakened me and kept me sane. It gave me confidence as a young woman, a pool of inner strength to drink from, and resolve through a difficult stage of uncertainty, self-doubt, and soul-breaking tragedy. Simply put, that fragile, brief and fleeting time we call youth. VIII. LIFE'S GIFTSI saw a woman sleeping. In her sleep she dreamt Life stood before her, and held in each hand a gift--in the one Love, in the other Freedom. And she [...]

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    2. In this magical collection, abstract concepts such as love, life and truth amongst others are explained in enchanting fables that captivate and mesmerise the reader. My favourite quote from the book is, 'Are you so sinless you have right to hate?' Simply beautiful and truly powerful! <3

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    3. Becket ClarkPioter10 February 2015FLCH I chose Dreams by Olive Schreiner for my dialogue essay. Olive Schreiner was an anti war campaigner and intellectual that lived from 1855 to 1920. She wrote many radical and social commenting books, her first and most famous of which being The Story of an African Farm in 1883, which is known for being one of the first feminist books ever written. Dreams, her second book, is a collection of short stories based off of dreams and experiences from the time she [...]

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    4. Beauty. To master complexity into simplicity, to woven a seemingly abstract concept such as truth and knowledge in fairy tale fashion. How have been the author tucked away from us!

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    5. Absolutely my favorite book ever. I read it to my daughter as bed time stories.

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    6. Lo que quiere representar en las historias es muy interesante. He leído este libro gracias a la universidad en una asignatura sobre el papel de la mujer en la literatura y desde ese punto, el libro merece la pena. Sin embargo la forma tan infantil que tiene de contar las historias ha hecho que en muchos momentos se me hiciera un mundo.

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    7. It starts getting you in a weird set, line after line you will start getting it and getting more involved, it is pure genius how such abstract definitions like immortality, truth and so on be real, It is beyond Genius, at the end you'll ask your self : Why didn't I read it before?

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    8. I found an old, tiny copy of this book in an antique store off a country highway in the summer when I was 17. I was drawn to the delicate cover (not the one shown in this cover, much prettier) and knew I had to own it. It was the best $10 I ever spent. The book is made up of numerous short stories and every single one of them speaks to me in a way I hadn't thought another person could understand. Olive was a woman ahead of her time and the beautiful, spiritual stories she's woven together go de [...]

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    9. One does not often have the privilege to spend time within the dreams of another. And yet, Dreams allows its reader to do just that - to soar through the vividly imagined or dreamt worlds of our sleep. If you can find a copy read it!

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    10. i own a great old copy pub date but near as i can tell it dates to at least 1900. love it!

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    11. Inspiration to Howard Thurman

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    12. Explains what happened to me to make the ideal, real.

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    13. Very underrated book.Olive Schreiner's writing might seem simple, yet it is metaphorically powerful to such an extent that you might need to stop and process the reading, after each story.Clearly ahead of times, the picture of woman's liberation was shaped in her mind, and we can even see how the author's voice evolves from one story to another.However, liberation seems to be reserved to white females in her work, as there are recurrent associations of the colour white to positive considered cha [...]

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    14. Read "Three Dreams in a Dessert"

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