Not a Crime to Be Poor: The Criminalization of Poverty in America

  • Title: Not a Crime to Be Poor: The Criminalization of Poverty in America
  • Author: Peter Edelman
  • ISBN: 9781620971635
  • Page: 112
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Not a Crime to Be Poor The Criminalization of Poverty in America Named one of the books to read after you ve read Evicted by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinal A powerful investigation into the ways the United States has addressed poverty Lucid and troubling Matthew
    Named one of the 10 books to read after you ve read Evicted by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinal A powerful investigation into the ways the United States has addressed poverty Lucid and troubling Matthew Desmond, author of Evicted, in The Chronicle of Higher EducationA nationally known expert on poverty shows how not having money has been criminalized and shines aNamed one of the 10 books to read after you ve read Evicted by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinal A powerful investigation into the ways the United States has addressed poverty Lucid and troubling Matthew Desmond, author of Evicted, in The Chronicle of Higher EducationA nationally known expert on poverty shows how not having money has been criminalized and shines a light on lawyers, activists, and policy makers working for a humane approachIn addition to exposing racially biased policing, the Justice Department s Ferguson Report exposed to the world a system of fines and fees levied for minor crimes in Ferguson, Missouri, that, when they proved too expensive for Ferguson s largely poor, African American population, resulted in jail sentences for thousands of people.As former staffer to Robert F Kennedy and current Georgetown law professor Peter Edelman explains in Not a Crime to Be Poor, Ferguson is everywhere in America today Through money bail systems, fees and fines, strictly enforced laws and regulations against behavior including trespassing and public urination that largely affect the homeless, and the substitution of prisons and jails for the mental hospitals that have traditionally served the impoverished, in one of the richest countries on Earth we have effectively made it a crime to be poor.Edelman, who famously resigned from the administration of Bill Clinton over welfare reform, connects the dots between these policies and others including school discipline in poor communities, child support policies affecting the poor, public housing ordinances, addiction treatment, and the specter of public benefits fraud to paint a picture of a mean spirited, retributive system that seals whole communities into inescapable cycles of poverty.

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      Published :2020-01-03T02:30:50+00:00

    About Peter Edelman


    1. Peter Edelman Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Not a Crime to Be Poor: The Criminalization of Poverty in America book, this is one of the most wanted Peter Edelman author readers around the world.


    874 Comments


    1. This was a very good survey of all the ways in which the poor get screwed by the legal system. It's expensive to be poor and in some circumstances, it is a crime. The book is dry and technical and not an easy read, but what I liked about it is that instead of just talking about problems, Edelman also talks about solutions--as in, not solutions that should be tried, but things that are currently being done to remedy each problem. It's a pragmatic book--not a polemic. More a resource to advocates [...]

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    2. Very eye-opening book about the manner in which American poverty has become criminalized over the last 30 years--through mass incarceration, the money bail system, child support enforcement, housing ordinances, etc. What's interesting about Edelman's book is that it is mostly solutions based; instead of constant reporting on the problems that he makes abundantly clear, he offers solutions at the end of each chapter as well as a lengthy section at the end of the book that's packed with informatio [...]

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    3. "One of the richest countries on Earth has effectively criminalized poverty."Courts are now for profit making money off of the low income. Plenty of high traffic cases for minor offenses that years ago would've been let off with a warning.Problem: Welfare policies keep recipients locked in , deindustrialization, low wage jobs, nepotism and corruption in hiring, union weakening, changes in family structure ( women are primary caregivers), deterioration of public education , mass incarceration, hi [...]

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    4. Not the most riveting book but an important one. The last chapter profiled 7 programs that are making a big difference in the lives of the poord was the best of the book, IMO. What else I took from this book is that all over our country are thousands of people working hard in the courts, the prisons, the jails, in neighborhoods, in schools, in corporations make lives better for poor people. We who are fortunate must never dismiss the unfortunate.

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    5. Sometimes it’s obvious this book was written by a law professor, but Peter Edelman obviously has a strong passion for ending poverty. We have a lot to learn from him. Part one is all about how we have criminalized poverty, and includes chapters on debtors’ prisons, bail and the costs of probation, mental illness, child support, public benefits, school discipline, public housing, and homelessness. Part two is inspirational stories of how criminal justice is being reformed and organizations ar [...]

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    6. Of great relevance to me while I was finishing Edelman's book is that I was serving on a jury to determine the guilt or innocence of a man charged with being the operator of a marijuana stash house and a weapons charge. As I watched the young man during three days of witness testimony I could not help but reflect on Edelman's book and the multiple decades where US law has been tightened to be "tough on crime" and as we have learned that ultimately we are creating a worse problem for our society. [...]

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    7. This book is excellent at dissecting all of the racist, oppressive, illogical, and antediluvian aspects of our legal system. The writing of the book is very methodical - a catchy story of an ordinary person, a tangle or chronic pattern of contact with policing and being locked up, catastrophic fines and fees, and absurd traps and loopholes that seed doubt in any justice or peace being performed by our legal system. Story after story, Edelman gets the point across, clearly, how race, class, and a [...]

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    8. This book is on a crucially important topic and presents it in an accessible way. The author also managed to capture many of the nuances and interlocking issues that combine to make being poor a crime in America. I want more people to read this book so that they hopefully understand the issue, but also so that they get inspired to fight back.That being said, I wish this book had had a resource section appended to the end. The writing is also uneven and sections are not necessarily linked togethe [...]

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    9. I read a lot of books about poverty and mass incarceration--Just Mercy, New Jim Crow, Evicted, etc.--and I found this book to be disappointing. This book was simply not an enjoyable read. It was too dense, and I found I could only read 20 pages at a time without my eyes glazing over.

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    10. Disturbing evidence and reasoned narrative on the comorbidity of criminal justice, mental health, homelessness, unemployment and poverty.

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