Mesjogge

  • Title: Mesjogge
  • Author: Isaac Bashevis Singer Bartho Kriek
  • ISBN: 9789029537162
  • Page: 316
  • Format: Paperback
  • Mesjogge Een joodse schrijver uit Polen ontmoet in New York een oude bekende uit zijn geboorteland die hem in contact brengt met een jonge vrouw Al gauw ontstaat er een merkwaardige driehoeksverhouding
    Een joodse schrijver uit Polen ontmoet in New York een oude bekende uit zijn geboorteland, die hem in contact brengt met een jonge vrouw Al gauw ontstaat er een merkwaardige driehoeksverhouding.

    • Best Download [Isaac Bashevis Singer Bartho Kriek] ¾ Mesjogge || [Suspense Book] PDF ☆
      316 Isaac Bashevis Singer Bartho Kriek
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      Posted by:Isaac Bashevis Singer Bartho Kriek
      Published :2019-08-23T12:38:32+00:00

    About Isaac Bashevis Singer Bartho Kriek


    1. Isaac Bashevis Singer was a Polish American author of Jewish descent, noted for his short stories He was one of the leading figures in the Yiddish literary movement, and received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978 His memoir, A Day Of Pleasure Stories of a Boy Growing Up in Warsaw , won the U.S National Book Award in Children s Literature in 1970, while his collection A Crown of Feathers and Other Stories won the U.S National Book Award in Fiction in 1974.


    557 Comments


    1. The opening line is fantastic--"It happened more than once that someone I thought had died in Hitler's camps suddenly turned up alive and well."I just wasn't feeling the rest of it, though. I've read a number of his short stories and really liked them, but this story is not really very interesting to me. It also seems to have lost something in translation, which I suppose is to be expected, but disappointing all the same. There's one part in particular where Max chides Aaron for addressing him b [...]

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    2. Meshugah is a Yiddish word that can mean crazy, senseless, insane. And that is exactly the right title for this work by the late Issac Bashevis Singer. For what we have here is several links between friend and family relations of outrageous craziness, a comedy of post-war, post-holocaust, semi-religious/Jewish/atheistic muddled vision of life. And it circles around an even more muddled love triangle of a young woman, Miriam, who already has a husband, one she can't stand, who is having an affair [...]

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    3. Disfrutamos con las obras de literatura precisamente porque no nos exigen ninguna responsabilidad. Podemos abrir y cerrar los libros cuando queramos. No estamos llamados a consolar al que sufre ni a tenderle una mano.

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    4. Más que la historia, es ese Nueva York lleno de refugiados, con personas tan diversas pero que a la vez tienen un pasado en común. Un Hitler. Siempre es interesante aprender sobre una comunidad tan particular como la judía, que ha sido encasillada y juzgada y pocas veces comprendida.

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    5. Nem mondom, hogy életem legnagyobb olvasmányélménye volt, de biztosan gyakran eszembe fog jutni ez a könyv.Meg az is, hogy milyen hülye vége van.

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    6. Ug. No. I love books with Jewish culture but this one confused and bored me to death.

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    7. Title: Isaac Bashevis Singer MeshugahTranslated by: the author and Nili WachtelPages: 240Publisher: June 16th 2003 by Farrar Straus Giroux (first published April 1994)Isbn: 0374529094 (ISBN13: 9780374529093)“MESHUGAH (me-shug-a) ---Yiddish word meaning crazy, senseless, insane.” Isaac Bashevis Singer Meshugah tells an insane story of a triangular love relationship of a married man Max, Aaron, a popular writer and a woman name Miriam. They were the Jewish of whom survived the Holocaust in War [...]

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    8. You'd think he'd have a more cohesive message than, "The world is just crazy." You're 79. You came though the Holocaust. You were living in post-post diaspora New York. Can you write something more meaningful than this book? The narrator goes around with a lot of girls enamoured of his writing. He has an affair with a lady who worked the oldest profession to save herself from Nazi atrocities. He goes to Israel. He returns to New York.Even if there are no answers to the big question post-Holocaus [...]

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    9. This was my first Singer novel, and I must say I was mildly disappointed. Some of the flaws were probably unavoidable due to the serialized nature of the original novel, but more importantly I didn't find many of the characters interesting.In particular, the narrator was infuriatingly passive throughout the novel. Everyone else spoke to him in paragraphs, and he barely got a word in edgewise. I realize that this was an intentional character trait, but ultimately I didn't care much about this eph [...]

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    10. Il libro narra la storia un po’ strampalata di un ambiguo intreccio di amicizia/amore tra tre individui molto diversi tra loro: una ragazza di 27 anni con un oscuro passato, un vecchio gaudente di 70 anni e uno scrittore di mezza età con il cuore legato al mondo perduto della Polonia ebraica e la mente immersa nella vita newyorchese. La storia si svolge tra New York ed Israele nell’ambito della comunità degli ebrei polacchi sfuggiti ai campi di concentramento e rifugiatisi negli Stati Unit [...]

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    11. What a strange bookI'm not really sure what I thought of it.It was about a Jewish writer of serialised novels who gets involved with an older friend and his younger mistress, who has been in concentration camps and may have some very dark things in her past. Well written, obviously, but it had a hysterical edge that was a bit unnerving. I was slightly unsure whether some bits were meant to be funny or not. The central female character's bizarre masochism and the male character's cowardice and mi [...]

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    12. Of all the writers I discovered after college, Isaac Singer is probably my favorite. I really love the energy he brings to his writing and the way he blends the sad with the happy with the comedic. Here's one example from this book. To set the scene, think an apartment where a cuckold husband comes rushing in with a pistol threatening his wife and the narrator:"Put on your tie," Stanley said to me. "Before you go I want to ask you a question. Is it true that you believe in God?""I believe in His [...]

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    13. Jeżeli ta książka była pierwszą przeczytaną powieścią tego autora, można być niemalże pewnym jednego. Mianowicie dana osoba do Singera nie wróci. Mnie okropnie zraziła na długi czas do pisarza. Okropny kontrast, zwłaszcza w porównaniu do sagi rodzinnej jego brata. Zamiast się męczyć, lepiej przeczytać "Dwór", utwór o klasę lepszy.

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    14. The book could perhaps be summed up in one conversation from the book: Stefa asked "Whenever I try to guess what's next in the novel, you turn the plot upside down. Is this a method of yours?" Aaron replied, "It's life's method."

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    15. Light and entertaining but sad tale of Jewish survivors from Poland who are trying to carry on in this crazy world (the title is Yiddish for crazy) after everyone they left behind was murdered. Its original Yiddish title was "Lost Souls".

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    16. I'm loving this so far. Singer's language is Yiddish music to my ears and learning about NYC Jewery after WWII is fascinating. Oops! Haven't been on in a long time. I finished this book a few weeks later. An easy, entertaining, educational read!

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    17. I'm so fond of this book !

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    18. Despite its many accolades, I feel like this book is a little inaccessible to non-Jewish people such as myself!

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    19. Classic I.B. Singer, the author I know I can count on for a good read.

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    20. While I liked the Yiddish phrases here and there, I didn't like the story overall.

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