Good-Bye Wisconsin

  • Title: Good-Bye Wisconsin
  • Author: Glenway Wescott
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 199
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Good Bye Wisconsin Rural Wisconsin was still a wilderness in these early s stories by Glenway Wescott The distances between farms and small towns seemed great in those days So too was the struggle of social order
    Rural Wisconsin was still a wilderness in these early 1920s stories by Glenway Wescott The distances between farms and small towns seemed great in those days So, too, was the struggle of social order and religion against poverty, nature, and a stubborn streak of lawlessness But the real adventure in these stories is in Wescott s deep understanding of human nature His cRural Wisconsin was still a wilderness in these early 1920s stories by Glenway Wescott The distances between farms and small towns seemed great in those days So, too, was the struggle of social order and religion against poverty, nature, and a stubborn streak of lawlessness But the real adventure in these stories is in Wescott s deep understanding of human nature His characters may be tragic, heroic, comic, or inspiring but, if there is one theme here, it is the search for personal freedom.

    • ↠ Good-Bye Wisconsin || ✓ PDF Download by ☆ Glenway Wescott
      199 Glenway Wescott
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ Good-Bye Wisconsin || ✓ PDF Download by ☆ Glenway Wescott
      Posted by:Glenway Wescott
      Published :2019-08-15T00:48:24+00:00

    About Glenway Wescott


    1. Glenway Wescott grew up in Wisconsin and briefly attended the University of Chicago where he met in 1919 his longtime partner Monroe Wheeler In 1925 he and Wheeler moved to France, where they mingled with Gertrude Stein and other American expatriates, notably Ernest Hemingway, who created an unflattering portrait of Wescott in the character of Robert Prentiss in The Sun Also Rises Eventually, Wescott and Wheeler returned to America and lived in New York City, and later on a large farm in Rosemont, New Jersey owned by his brother, the philanthropist Lloyd Wescott, along with other family members.Wescott s early fiction, the novels The Apple of the Eye 1924 and the Harper Prize winning The Grandmothers 1927 and the story collection Goodbye, Wisconsin 1928 were set in his native Midwest.Later work included essays on political, literary, and spiritual subjects, as well as the novels The Pilgrim Hawk 1940 , which shared a narrator in Alwyn Towers with The Grandmothers, and Apartment in Athens 1945 Wescott s journals, recording his many literary and artistic friendships, offering an intimate view of his life as a gay man, were published posthumously under the title Continual Lessons.


    558 Comments


    1. I'm often made uncomfortable by settings of rural squalor, tales of the dimwitted, and people striving to get to and stay in the middle class, hanging on by their fingertips, just barely. So, many of the stories in this collection made me uneasy (hence my unappreciative 3-star rating for a writer deep in talent). In "The Runaways," a young married couple set fire to her deceased parents' farmhouse in order to collect the insurance money; when the scheme is sniffed out as suspicious, they hit the [...]

      Reply

    2. Beside this temple dedicated to Fear, the Lacedaemonians have others consecrated to Death, Laughter, and similar powers.They honor Fear, not as a baleful spirit tobe propitiated, but because they regard itas the chief support of their body politic."- Plutarch, Agis and CleomenesThe stories in this collection were written before, during and after the success of his novels, also centered in rural Wisconsin. Wescott intentionally moved away from his roots after publishing Goodbye, Wisconsin, and hi [...]

      Reply

    3. I am not much for short stories and the first story put me off a bit being a little too ostentatious for my taste even though I felt it was an interesting unique style of writing. The rest of the stories were good but I always feel like the endings are insufficient to get a complete sense of the story. It is hard for me to say if it gave a good sense of what Wisconsin was like in the 1920s but I am guessing that it does, being a Wisconsinite myself.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *