Bugged: The Insects Who Rule the World and the People Obsessed with Them

  • Title: Bugged: The Insects Who Rule the World and the People Obsessed with Them
  • Author: David MacNeal
  • ISBN: 9781250095503
  • Page: 274
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Bugged The Insects Who Rule the World and the People Obsessed with Them Insects have been shaping our ecological world and plant life for over million years In fact our world is essentially run by bugs there are billion for every human on the planet In Bugged jo
    Insects have been shaping our ecological world and plant life for over 400 million years In fact, our world is essentially run by bugs there are 1.4 billion for every human on the planet In Bugged, journalist David MacNeal takes us on an off beat scientific journey that weaves together history, travel, and culture in order to define our relationship with these mini monInsects have been shaping our ecological world and plant life for over 400 million years In fact, our world is essentially run by bugs there are 1.4 billion for every human on the planet In Bugged, journalist David MacNeal takes us on an off beat scientific journey that weaves together history, travel, and culture in order to define our relationship with these mini monsters.MacNeal introduces a cast of bug lovers from a woman facilitating tarantula sex and an exterminator nursing bedbugs on his own blood , to a kingpin of the black market insect trade and a maggotologist who obsess over the crucial role insects play in our everyday lives.Just like bugs, this book is global in its scope, diversity, and intrigue Hands on with pet beetles in Japan, releasing lab raised mosquitoes in Brazil, beekeeping on a Greek island, or using urine and antlers as means of ancient pest control, MacNeal s quest appeals to the squeamish and brave alike Demonstrating insects amazingly complex mechanics, he strings together varied interactions we humans have with them, like extermination, epidemics, and biomimicry And, when the journey comes to an end, MacNeal examines their commercial role in our world in an effort to help us ultimately cherish and maybe even eat bugs.

    • ¹ Bugged: The Insects Who Rule the World and the People Obsessed with Them || ✓ PDF Read by Ù David MacNeal
      274 David MacNeal
    • thumbnail Title: ¹ Bugged: The Insects Who Rule the World and the People Obsessed with Them || ✓ PDF Read by Ù David MacNeal
      Posted by:David MacNeal
      Published :2019-02-02T12:20:29+00:00

    About David MacNeal


    1. David MacNeal Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Bugged: The Insects Who Rule the World and the People Obsessed with Them book, this is one of the most wanted David MacNeal author readers around the world.


    842 Comments


    1. *Disclaimer: I was provided with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*If I am honest at first I really did not like this book. I did not like the way the story jumped around from different anecdotes with no real flow. One minute he is talking about crickets, the next it is a completely different topic, with no idea how he got there. It felt like the first section was a bunch of random facts about insects thrown together. The later chapters are much better, although the force [...]

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    2. I have mixed feelings about this book. Some of the information was interesting and informative (if superficial), some less so. However, the writing style was overly chatty and erratic, with various anecdotes jumping around all over the place and no real flow to the book. It reminded me a lot of a Mary Roach book, with the forced humour, over chattiness, disjointed subject matter and too much interview details in comparison with actual information. This is especially problematic with the first 3 [...]

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    3. Subititled The Insects that Rule the World and the People Obsessed with Them, Bugged is a fascinating look at the world of entomology(the study of insects). It outlines the history of the human relationship with insects, going back to the first cave painting of an insect. The book then looks in more detail at topics such as pest control, epidemics of diseases carried by insects, social insects, insect sex and insects as food with a whole chapter devoted to the history of the human relationship w [...]

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    4. This book strikes a balance between personal travel memoir and popular science book. The science was much more intriguing than the anecdotal stories of the writers travels across the world seeking the history, study, and application of insects, though as a scientist I lean facts over travel diary. It's possible to skim over the anecdotes of the author's Bill "F8ing" Murray pet cockroach and gleam a few interesting ideas from the book (like details about the Japanese history of insect collection) [...]

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    5. While I can't say I hated this book, I had a hard time with it and expected better. However, the things that didn't appeal to me personally, I imagine would very much appeal to another reader. I thought it would be easier to list them:1.) This really did focus a lot more on the people who interact with bugs.2.) It had miles of footnotes.3.) It had a similar style to a Mary Roach book.A different reader might very much enjoy this book.

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    6. I like bugs. I liked this book. What would have sent it to the top of the charts would be high resolution photos of all the bugs cited as they are cited. Quite informative and entertaining. I particularly enjoyed the section on bug-love in Japan.

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    7. Excellent science writing about our insect world.

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    8. Very fun, broad topic that is extremely accessible to all readers. Really good!

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    9. This was an interesting book with a wide range of topics relating to insects. Everything from eating bugs to apiculture. I enjoyed it.

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    10. It's a fun and informative read for anyone who's remotely interested in the insects with which we share the planet and the uses we have from for them

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    11. I finished early. It was a good book but a bit too technical for me.

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    12. Ewww bugs. Interesting people, however.

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    13. I love this book. I am hopeful that David MacNeal will write more books. Insects are fascinating, but his humor (which reminded me often of my uncles) and storytelling encouraged me nonstop reading. It left me sad to finish. A hallmark of any good book.

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