The Totally Unscientific Study of the Search for Human Happiness

  • Title: The Totally Unscientific Study of the Search for Human Happiness
  • Author: Paula Poundstone
  • ISBN: 9781616204167
  • Page: 120
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Totally Unscientific Study of the Search for Human Happiness A remarkable journey I laughed I cried I got another cat Lily Tomlin Paula Poundstone is the funniest human being I have ever known Peter Sagal host of Wait Wait Don t Tell Me and author of The Book
    A remarkable journey I laughed I cried I got another cat Lily Tomlin Paula Poundstone is the funniest human being I have ever known Peter Sagal, host of Wait Wait Don t Tell Me and author of The Book of Vice Is there a secret to happiness asks comedian Paula Poundstone I don t know how or why anyone would keep it a secret It seems rather cruel, rea A remarkable journey I laughed I cried I got another cat Lily Tomlin Paula Poundstone is the funniest human being I have ever known Peter Sagal, host of Wait Wait Don t Tell Me and author of The Book of Vice Is there a secret to happiness asks comedian Paula Poundstone I don t know how or why anyone would keep it a secret It seems rather cruel, really Where could it be Is it deceptively simple Does it melt at a certain temperature Can you buy it Must you suffer for it before or after In her wildly and wisely observed book, the comedy legend takes on that most inalienable of rights the pursuit of happiness Offering herself up as a human guinea pig in a series of thoroughly unscientific experiments, Poundstone tries out a different get happy hypothesis in each chapter of her data driven search She gets in shape with taekwondo She drives fast behind the wheel of a Lamborghini She communes with nature while camping with her daughter, and commits to getting her house organized twice Swing dancing Meditation Volunteering Does any of it bring her happiness You may be laughing too hard to care The Totally Unscientific Study of the Search for Human Happiness is both a story of jumping into new experiences with both feet and a surprisingly poignant tale of a single working mother of three children not to mention dozens of cats, a dog, a bearded dragon lizard, a lop eared bunny, and one ant left from her ant farm who is just trying to keep smiling while living a busy life The queen of the skepticism fueled rant, Paula Poundstone stands alone in her talent for bursting bubbles and slaying sacred cows Like George Carlin, Steve Martin, and David Sedaris, she is a master of her craft, and her comedic brilliance is served up in abundance in this book As author and humorist Roy Blount Jr notes, Paula Poundstone deserves to be happy Nobody deserves to be this funny.

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      120 Paula Poundstone
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      Posted by:Paula Poundstone
      Published :2020-01-06T14:10:51+00:00

    About Paula Poundstone


    1. Paula Poundstone is an American stand up comedian She is known for her quiet, self deprecating style, political observations, and her trademark oddly masculine style of dress, a suit and tie outfit.


    493 Comments


    1. It's good brain candy.This book provides about threeheps of happiness.

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    2. I liked reading this book despite not having previous knowledge of Paula Poundstone. She conducts happiness experiments throughout this book, which are written in lab record format. Paula is obviously a witty person. I love self-deprecatory jokes and those are aplenty in this book. I was snorting occasionally at some of her jokes.This witty human loves Harry Potter as much as we all do–she has cats named Sirius and Tonks! The occasional Potter-related jokes had me cackling while reading the bo [...]

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    3. Although I appreciated Paula Poundstone's long-term dedication to writing this book, I didn't find it to be very entertaining. Each chapter followed a repetitive format, at least for the "happiness" experiments. Otherwise, the writing veered off onto essays about the author's cats or her children. Fans of Poundstone's comedic routines and shows may relate better to this book than myself.

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    4. I associate Poundstone most closely with NPR, though I do remember seeing her do standup on Carson’s Tonight Show. I knew next to nothing about her personal life, so it was surprising when so much of the book dealt with her three kids. I was perplexed by the name of one of the kids, which she kept pronouncing as Thomasee. It remained a mystery until I looked it up, and found she was saying Thomas E.I enjoy her humor, which is observational and not cruel. I was thrilled when she said she hated [...]

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    5. If I were asked to pin a moral to this story, I’d say that trying new things can result in unexpected adventures. Sometimes those adventures are fun, sometimes aggravating, and sometimes rewarding. This book is a lot of fun, but I think there is real meaning among the gags, the embarrassments, the moody teens, and the cats. And even more surprisingly, I found this book to be somewhat scientific despite the tongue-in-cheek disclaimer in the title and the heavy use of ironically scientific repor [...]

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    6. received a free copy of this book from the author/publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Comedian Paula Poundstone is determined to find the perfect recipe for happiness and in this book details a series of different experiments she set herself to help her be happy. From fitness, life organisation and dancing, Poundstone gave everything a whirl.I liked this book for what it was which was just a comedic take on trying new things, basically. I admired Poundstone's gumption to ju [...]

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    7. I frankly was not sure what to expect when I first started reading this book, which I received courtesy of NetGalley. I mainly know Paula Poundstone from "Wait, WaitDon't Tell Me!" on NPR, where I always enjoy her appearances, and so I thought that at the very least, this would make for a decently enjoyable read. As it turns out, I underestimated this book immensely. When I wasn't laughing at her various, valiant and also often awkward attempts to find a "hep" or two of happiness in her diverse [...]

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    8. While I found this book to be very funny in places, it was also surprisingly sad. I am a huge fan of Paula Poundstone, and I applaud her for digging deep into her often fraught relationships with her children, her worries about money, rebuilding her reputation after some bad years - leading her to the happiness project she recounts here. She reminds the reader that not everything is rosy in life, and sometimes things never get resolved, but we can find ways to push through it by trying new thing [...]

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    9. I couldn't help but be sucked in by this book. It's not what I expected at all. It's very funny at times, but it's more of a straight memoir about her life with her kids than I thought it would be. I met Paula at the American Library Association Midwinter conference, where I got this book. Her standup that night overlapped quite a bit with the book, but instead of seeming redundant, it expanded on the stories she told there and made me feel like I was really getting to know her. And the premise [...]

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    10. Laughed out loud, empathized, nodded along and teared up. Humor is very subjective and personal-- and I feel this book will resonate best with people who have raised children--the goal of which is to raise good adults. It is a love letter/ memoir to her now-adult children.

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    11. Comedian Paula Poundstone (NPR's Wait Wait Don't Tell Me!, HBO and Bravo comedy specials) pursues the secrets of happiness with a series of over the top unscientific studies. Whether it's learning to dance, getting in shape, getting closer to nature, or binge watching movies, Poundstone dedicates herself to trying anything that promises happiness and recording the results. Peppered with hilarious asides, family squabbles, failures, cat litter, and hands on research; listeners will find themselve [...]

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    12. I was seeking a laugh-out-loud book but this wasn’t it. Humor is, admittedly, subjective and I was not familiar with this comedienne’s work on NPR so didn’t know what I was getting into. Paula was very honest with her rough times in life but a woman who owns 16 cats and sleeps on a sheet on the living room floor is hard for me to relate to. I kept wondering if Paula’s three children were ok with her exposing their quirks and faults to the world. In general, the writing did not flow very [...]

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    13. Sometimes being open about your faults combined with being funny can come off as self-deprecating, but I think Paula keeps a nice balance. The experiments are varied and honest. My favorite part is that she tried to find happiness in real life. She didn't totally uproot herself to the top of a Tibetan mountain or go into hidinge tried to institute small happiness inducing changes will taking the kids to school and scooping kitty litter and traveling for work. Definitely worth the read and the su [...]

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    14. I love books where I actually laugh out loud while reading. Very funny and touching

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    15. I've been a fan of Paula Poundstone for many years. Her quirky humor and quick wit make me laugh out loud on a regular basis. This book documents her "search for happiness" through various methods, but it also documents her life with her children and her current career. She tries many things to see if they bring happiness, from driving a Lamborghini (for a day) to volunteering in a nursing home. She also tries camping and hiking with her oldest daughter and learning how to meditate. The thread t [...]

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    16. Paula Poundstone is great. This is by far my favorite "happiness study" sort of book. I do wonder if she might be a little too concerned about her son's screen addiction - but the book was about her quest for happiness, not how much time her son was spending with electronics and why it became a problem. I'm also convinced she is some kind of superhuman woman, because NO ONE has enough time in the day to deal with sixteen cats. Good lord, woman. The two proofreading problems are related to forgot [...]

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    17. Paula gets it. A laugh out loud delight that entertains and informs. Life and happiness can be messy. (As can having too many cats.) Paula brings her engaging sense of humor to the search for what every human seeks: happiness. In her journey, she shares the ups and downs of child-rearing, being owned by felines, the mundane daily necessities of life and the nutty things we do to "fix" ourselves. It's a journey worth taking, and in the end, however fleeting, we find that happiness is all around u [...]

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    18. Paula- thank you for the baloos of light and laughs you provided in this book.

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    19. I laughed so hard reading this my abs hurt. I have no other words but that I loved it

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    20. This was a good book to listen to - funny and touching.

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    21. The street talk was overbearing, but it was funny .

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    22. I decided not to finish reading this book, but was curious to see if others were having a similar reaction. To my astonishment, I am alone in not loving this book. I feel sorry for the author/comedienne so am hesitant to write a very negative review. That said, here's my opinion after making it over 100 pages:**SPOILERS**What is funny about a woman going broke, living in filth with her children and pets, being inept with modern life from being able to drive point a to point b to using a computer [...]

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    23. Terrific. You simply cannot go wrong with the story of a great white whale and the boy who hated him.

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    24. I love it when Paula Poundstone is on National Public Radio's weekly news quiz show "Wait Wait Don't Tell Me." Her stories about her life as a foster mother and mother of several adopted children, many cats, and a few other assorted critters are almost always amusing. I also admire the responsibility she has taken for the times in life she's screwed up (which when you're a public figure tend to be, well, more public.) I have not read any of her other works so was interested to hear how her agile [...]

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    25. I like when humor books are presented within a self-improving project, with plenty of opportunities for the comedian to make fun of his/herself.* In this one, Poundstone arranges new experiences for herself of activities known to result in happiness: to get organized, learn to swing dance, drive a sports car If you are familiar with the scientific method, she lifts the terms (hypothesis, variables, constant, field notes, analysis) and uses them in a creative and funny way. I laughed a lot. My fa [...]

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    26. My familiarity with Paula Poundstone comes from the NPR radio show Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me, a show I’ve listened to for many years. I’ve always enjoyed Poundstone as a guest so I thought I’d give her book a try.I really wanted to like it.You’ve heard of “Dad jokes”? These are “Mom jokes” and mom is about as edgy as a pudding cup.

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    27. It's an amusing idea and totally in keeping with the way she reacts to dubious scientific studies on Wait Wait Don't Tell me. The book is well written and amusing; however, the frequent off-hand comments about the state of her family quickly become very depressing. The book does start to drag just a bit as all the various unscientific ideas are exhausted, but overall it was entertaining and worth reading.

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    28. This review is also available on my blog, Read Till Dawn.I don't usually go for self-help books, because the advice they offer isn't really that helpful for me. And I struggle sometimes to get into reading memoirs by comedians because they wind up being way less funny on paper than they are in person.I took the leap with The Totally Unscientific Study of the Search for Human Happiness, though, because I didn't know Poundstone's work well enough to be offended if the book didn't live up to it, bu [...]

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    29. Paula Poundstone is one of my favorites on Wait, Wait, Don't Tell me on NPR, currently at 11 a.m. on Sat. & Sun. This work has some very very funny things, and then some not so swellShe has 16 cats, three kids, and many adventures. This one describes her "Search for Human Happiness." Spoiler Alert: just like Dorothy, Poundstone has the ability to find happiness already. Her many adventures include trying to be healthy by taking a martial art, taking a daughter camping, in which she, like Bil [...]

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    30. I often struggle with what to rate a book that I liked but did not love, and although says 3 stars is "I liked it" it feels like a low number. But 3.5 isn't an option, and I am not to the "I really liked it" point of four stars. It was an entertaining listen. Paula Poundstone can be funny. I always enjoy hearing her on NPR's Wait Wait Don't Tell Me, and I have actually attended one of her live shows also. But in this book, and in the live show, I found her not as entertaining as she is in the s [...]

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