The People in Pineapple Place

  • Title: The People in Pineapple Place
  • Author: Anne Lindbergh Marla Frazee
  • ISBN: 9780763617394
  • Page: 286
  • Format: Paperback
  • The People in Pineapple Place An absorbing classic fantasy that taps into the wishful thinking of every imaginative child In THE PEOPLE IN PINEAPPLE PLACE August Brown new kid on the block in Washington D C finds than he barga
    An absorbing, classic fantasy that taps into the wishful thinking of every imaginative child.In THE PEOPLE IN PINEAPPLE PLACE, August Brown, new kid on the block in Washington, D.C finds than he bargains for when he follows the ragbag lady to a mysterious street called Pineapple Place There, on a quaint cobblestone block of cheerful houses, live seven invisible eAn absorbing, classic fantasy that taps into the wishful thinking of every imaginative child.In THE PEOPLE IN PINEAPPLE PLACE, August Brown, new kid on the block in Washington, D.C finds than he bargains for when he follows the ragbag lady to a mysterious street called Pineapple Place There, on a quaint cobblestone block of cheerful houses, live seven invisible except to August children from another time Before he knows it, August and his fantastic new friends are off on the adventure of a lifetime

    • ✓ The People in Pineapple Place || ½ PDF Download by ↠ Anne Lindbergh Marla Frazee
      286 Anne Lindbergh Marla Frazee
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ The People in Pineapple Place || ½ PDF Download by ↠ Anne Lindbergh Marla Frazee
      Posted by:Anne Lindbergh Marla Frazee
      Published :2019-08-07T01:26:02+00:00

    About Anne Lindbergh Marla Frazee


    1. Anne Spencer Lindbergh, daughter of Anne Morrow Lindbergh and Charles Lindbergh sister of Reeve Lindbergh.Also published under the name Anne Lindbergh Feydy.New York Times obituary


    480 Comments


    1. As a young girl this was the book that started it all.My imagination flourished and the journey with the characters began. It was this book that I realized how one can make a character so real. You share their laughter, their joy and their pain. Their friends are your friends and you see them as if they are standing right beside you.

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    2. Cute, fairly gentle story, interesting variation on the time-slip idea. Think I may have read this one as a kid.

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    3. Every now and then I discover a fantastic book that I know I'll love forever. I found one today. It's called The People in Pineapple Place and was written by Anne Spencer Lindbergh (the daughter of Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh). It was originally published in 1982.It's a fantasy set in Washington D.C. about a street of people that are only visible to newcomer August Brown. August gets frustrated that no one else can see the wonderful world he's found (wouldn't you?) but he has gre [...]

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    4. Given to me from my Grandma as a gift when I was a child it took me a couple reads to get through it (I didn't much care for fantasy novels as a child. yeah weird for a kid I know). Read it when I was a teen and again this year after reading the Harry Potter series. I felt that if you like Harry Potter you would enjoy this novel. Although the people are not witches and wizards per se there are still many similarities in the ideas contained within. I think it's a wonderful children's novel that I [...]

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    5. The book was super because August (the little boy aged 10) met 7 kids who were invisible. His favorites were April and Mike. They liked going to the park together. One day he went back in time to 1939! Pineapple Place had a big party. August gave a lot of precious things to his friends, even his roller skates and baseball mitt. The people of Pineapple Place left for Chicago. There they met Zachary, August's friend.

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    6. The Washington Post recommended this book since it mentions a number of locations in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. I was interested because the places mentioned are all within about 7 miles from my house.It turned out to be a delightful book and we are currently enjoying the next book in the series. Pineapple Place is an imaginary street full of people and their houses, frozen in time and mostly invisible--except to some few lucky people, August (a boy) being one of the lucky few. The little comm [...]

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    7. Suddenly was reminded of enjoying this book as a child, and picked it up at the library on a whim. A boy failing to cope with his parents' divorce or his recent move makes a new friend, only to discover that to most people her street and its inhabitants are invisible. Pineapple Place has been disappearing and reappearing in different neighborhoods since World War One, and the people in it have remained the same age. Only occasionally can someone see one of them, and the idea of a person's charac [...]

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    8. Very cute little imaginative book about a young man trying to settle into a new world in Washington DC after his parents divorce. He makes some friends who prove quite helpful in getting him to enjoy his new surroundings -- children and adults displaced in time, living on Pineapple Place circa 1939. I found the story endearing and the glimpses of the city a lot of fun. The next time I am bumped on the street by an invisible person, I will suspect one of the O'Malley children. Originally I was th [...]

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    9. It's always fun to read a book that takes place in the city you live, and I think that if I had been a kid growing up in Georgetown reading this book, my head probably would have exploded. But as an adult, this book is magical verging on hokey. I really could see myself reading and rereading this book as a kid, but it's a bit too moral from an older and more modern perspective. Still super cute, though, with lots of fantastic scenes—like roller skating in the National Art Museum!

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    10. I highly recommend this for anyone who lives in DC - the author describes the area so well that I can almost picture exactly where in Georgetown the book is supposed to take place. (If I knew Georgetown better, of course, I could picture it exactly :-) ). I also loved the scene in which the kids (invisible to adults) go roller-skating through the National Gallery. That's now on my to-do list if I ever develop magical powers.

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    11. Not read this since I was a child, but out of all the books I have read I remember it very fondly. Some books just stick with you, and never are forgotten. This is one of the books that started me on my love of reading. I often think I should read it again, but I am worried the luster will fade, and the memories will somehow not mean as much as they did. Better to file it away in the happy place I have it than tarnish the memory.

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    12. My 8yo recently did a report on Charles Lindbergh, so when I noticed that Anne Lindbergh (his daughter) wrote youth novels, I decided to investigate them. I had to get this through inter-library loan, but I'm glad I did - it was very enjoyable! Also, it seems like there would be a number of good talking points: the family dynamics (August and his mom), being open to new things, friendship, thoughtful gifts, and much more. And I just love the gift that April gives him at the end.

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    13. This is one of my favorite read alouds as it completely engages the readers. You feel as if you really know August and April by the end of the story.Ideas for this book include travel, directions, friendship, best gift to give, etc.I like to pull in Charles Lindbergh as it's the author's father.

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    14. A charming children's book about a special street in Georgetown, near Washington D.C. August Brown moves to Georgetown after his parents divorce. He has no friends till he meets April who lives on Pineapple Place. The street doesn't exist to anyone else and only August can see them. A light, but well ritten children's book.

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    15. "The author, the daughter of Anne Morrow Lindbergh, brings vitality and charm to her descriptions of Washington's parks and pleasures."- New York Times Book Review"A beautifully handled fantasy." - Philadelphia Inquirer

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    16. I read this when a book club friend handed it to me, and then read it outloud to my children, ages 2-7. They were riveted. We read it in about a week and then they begged me to find book #2. These are out of print, so hard to find!

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    17. Not as good as I remembered from childhood.

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    18. It's not very often I pick up a book of the free table that I like, but I really did like the people of pineapple place. It was a cute, clean book.

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    19. This book was reallllllly awesome.

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    20. I accidentally requested this book from the library and was presently surprised to find that I enjoyed it very much. I will be happy to read it to Ellie and Mark when they get a bit older

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    21. Especially enjoyed the descriptions of Georgetown!

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    22. I read this book in elementary school and loved it so much that I still remember it to this day. I remember having to go to the dentist in Georgetown and imagining myself as part of the story!

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    23. I remember really enjoying this as a kid - will have to share with my own kids

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    24. I love Anne's writing style. She's an inspiration for me in my own writing.

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    25. Nice little book. Fun that it takes place a block from where I work

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    26. One of my favorite books from childhood ;-)

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    27. This is a fun book. I like how she weaves in the culture and geography of Washington DC.

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    28. Weird old kids book -- simplistic but readable.

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    29. Read for Ally's book club. I think it is a great book for 4th graders and is very imaginative. Deals with issues such as divorce, moving, and making friends.

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