Live at the Apollo

  • Title: Live at the Apollo
  • Author: Douglas Wolk
  • ISBN: 9780826415721
  • Page: 470
  • Format: Paperback
  • Live at the Apollo In this remarkable book Douglas Wolk brings to life an October evening in at the Apollo Theatre in Harlem an evening at the height of Cold War tensions In great detail Wolk pieces together wha
    In this remarkable book, Douglas Wolk brings to life an October evening in 1962, at the Apollo Theatre in Harlem an evening at the height of Cold War tensions In great detail, Wolk pieces together what took place and what was recorded that night, and illustrates beautifully the enduring power of one of James Brown s and popular music s defining moments Live at the ApoIn this remarkable book, Douglas Wolk brings to life an October evening in 1962, at the Apollo Theatre in Harlem an evening at the height of Cold War tensions In great detail, Wolk pieces together what took place and what was recorded that night, and illustrates beautifully the enduring power of one of James Brown s and popular music s defining moments Live at the Apollo EXCERPT Standing on the stage of the Apollo at a sold out show on the night of October 24, 1962, screaming, James Brown would have looked out and seen 1500 people screaming back at him in the audience, split between the floor and the balconies The walls behind them were a dark crimson the balconies were decorated with the laurel wreaths that are the emblem of Apollo the god, recalling Daphne, who became a laurel tree to escape his lust Most of the audience thought there was a good chance they d be dead within the week.

    • Ü Live at the Apollo || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Douglas Wolk
      470 Douglas Wolk
    • thumbnail Title: Ü Live at the Apollo || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Douglas Wolk
      Posted by:Douglas Wolk
      Published :2019-05-15T20:15:05+00:00

    About Douglas Wolk


    1. Douglas Wolk Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Live at the Apollo book, this is one of the most wanted Douglas Wolk author readers around the world.


    333 Comments


    1. A detail-packed, minute-by-minute look at the record which helped James Brown's career go stratospheric and changed the way R&B albums were seen. It's interesting how form follows content, here - just as the album is a white-hot smelting of snippets and fast cuts from tens of different R&B songs (and readings of those songs), Wolk's narrative is rapid, choppy, digressive. His 'band' are the tight array of chart facts and figures and recording details backing up his wilder flights of hist [...]

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    2. I can't stress enough how amazing this book is. I read it every time I travel back to the US (a 24 hour flight). And each time I find some new bit of research that Douglas Wolk has included that I overlooked in my previous reads. Disclaimer: I'm a huge James Brown fan, which should be factored into my review above. If you don't like James Brown, you shouldn't be reading this. Or really even existing. What's it like to hate life, fun, and goodness?There's so much going on in this (small) book. A [...]

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    3. The author tells you straight up: This book has a lot of numbers in it. That's because so much of music in this time was about what was hitting the charts -- and which charts. It's OK if you like numbers. If not, you'll be bored. There are a few great stories about the madman that was James Brown, but with such an interesting protagonist/antogonist, you could have a much more interesting read.

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    4. Uit de 33 1/3-reeks van Continuum Publishing, een reeks boekjes die me (elke rockfanaat?) op het lijf geschreven is. Ze gaan immers niet over artiesten (genoeg veredelde biografieën already!) maar over albums. Inderdaad, boekjes van een slordige honderd pagina’s in handig zakformaat die gaan over gemiddeld 40 minuten muziek. De voorbije vier jaar zijn er intussen al een paar dozijn verschenen en zowel classic rock (Let It Be (van The Beatles én The Replacements), Led Zeppelin IV) als indie ( [...]

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    5. When most people think of James Brown, they conjure up the hyperspeed grooves of “Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag” and “Cold Sweat.” Live at the Apollo was a coupla years before “Papa” and the frantic, syncopated funk that Brown made his trademark. This album is JB as a soulful, bluesy crooner — a stage of his career that folks often skip right over nowadays.That isn’t to say he took it easy in ‘62; even then, a James Brown stage show was one part adrenalin and two parts crackling [...]

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    6. Excellent note-by-note review of the great James Brown live album from 1962, recorded at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis. Gets into the background and future of each song and all the mechanics of the performance. Towards the end of the book (spoiler alert?) the author reveals that his account of the show is somewhat misleading; the record as released was assembled from recordings made throughout a day of performances at the Apollo rather than a single, uninterrupted set. Still, the Platon [...]

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    7. 33 1/3 books live or die on the metric of "does reading this make hearing the album more enjoyable?" This definitely passes the bar, as the context on songs, performers and goings on at a James Brown concert greatly improves a live album. The author's words replace our eyes, as we are not in the audience. Fortunately, Wolk doesn't overplay the coincidence that Brown's recording went on during the very night when the world came closest to nuclear armageddon.

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    8. I've been listening to this record a lot; I would even say it's my five-year old son's favorite record. As a piece of background on the album and Brown, it's quite successful. The added information about the Cuban Missile Crisis, which was happening at the time the album was recorded, is a bit thin. I wanted either the comparison to be meatier or else touched on less prominently. As it is, its inclusion seems forced and predetermined.

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    9. I don't own the album- and if you can't have it playing in the background while you read- don't bother with this one. It's a blow by blow of factoids from each note of the original album. The stuff about the Cuban missile crisis is a strange choice- don't quite see how James Brown's badass music at all related to global politics.

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    10. No need, really, to read this one if you've already read Smith's "The One" (which I did). This quickie details all-things "Live at the Apollo," including rather silly cutaways of play-by-play Cold War/Cuban Missile Crisis dramatics that don't really contribute much. For James Brown completists only.

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    11. I really like the way that this book was set up, and while the tangents seemed unimportant, they added a different level of interest to the entire affair. Stylistically, the book had an interesting flow, which aided in the overall aesthetics of the book. One of the better ones of the early part of the series.

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    12. Really clever approach, using the Cuban Missile Crisis as a framing device for the stint at the Apollo when this was recorded. Lots of good info about Brown,the album, live show, and recording. However, the tie-in with the Cuban Missile Crisis, while very interesting, also seems a bit underdeveloped. Overall, though, I enjoyed this book quite a bit.

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    13. I adore this book. This is fast becoming my favorite series and I've only read this one. The concept is brilliant. Reading about music is awesome, but usually writers are limited to a few columns in a magazine. With this they get to write as much as they want about records they love. Rock on!

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    14. Hey there, accretion of details! Before there was John D'Agata, there was James Brown. Also, kinda thought that build-up to nuclear war B plot was going somewhere. I love me some JB and have an unholy appetite for music arcana.

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    15. This is one of the more fluid and concise books of the 33 1/3 series. Filled with lots of great tid-bits of info on the various releases of this legendary LP. It also had an engaging side story on the state of the country the week of the Apollo shows which coincided with the Cuban Missle crisis.

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    16. Officially the worst book in the series. Wolk tries to recreate James Brown's concert at the Apollo and it comes off as pretentious rubbish. This is from a guy who said that Jeffrey Lewis' Crass covers album was pointless - well this book is worse!

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    17. One of the better 33 1/3 books, although the "historical context" kind of gets left behind at the end.

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    18. As someone below says, for James Brown completists only.Dreadful reading. Sorry, Douglas Wolk.

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    19. if you are fan of music, in general, you should like this book/essay. seriously.

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    20. This was informative as Wolk seems to know his stuff but his odd organization makes the narrative choppy and generally detracts from the project.

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    21. This book failed to deliver. Too much arcana, and it doesn't deliver on the Cuban Missile Crisis zeitgeist thing.

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    22. James Brown is a sex machine. Also the crowd sounds are faketaped! Oh well.

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    23. Tightly captures the energy of the performance in prose as well as giving some historical background of the songs on record. One of the better of the series.

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    24. Shows just how weird this album is, but didn't really help me appreciate its status. Still not a fan of LATA.

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