The Art of the Novel

  • Title: The Art of the Novel
  • Author: Milan Kundera Linda Asher
  • ISBN: 9780060093747
  • Page: 170
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Art of the Novel Kundera brilliantly examines the work of such important and diverse figures as Rabelais Cervantes Sterne Diderot Flaubert Tolstoy and Musil He is especially penetrating on Hermann Broch and his
    Kundera brilliantly examines the work of such important and diverse figures as Rabelais, Cervantes, Sterne, Diderot, Flaubert, Tolstoy, and Musil He is especially penetrating on Hermann Broch, and his exploration of the world of Kafka s novels vividly reveals the comic terror of Kafka s bureaucratized universe.Kundera s discussion of his own work includes his views on theKundera brilliantly examines the work of such important and diverse figures as Rabelais, Cervantes, Sterne, Diderot, Flaubert, Tolstoy, and Musil He is especially penetrating on Hermann Broch, and his exploration of the world of Kafka s novels vividly reveals the comic terror of Kafka s bureaucratized universe.Kundera s discussion of his own work includes his views on the role of historical events in fiction, the meaning of action, and the creation of character in the post psychological novel.

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      170 Milan Kundera Linda Asher
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      Posted by:Milan Kundera Linda Asher
      Published :2019-010-17T18:53:40+00:00

    About Milan Kundera Linda Asher


    1. Milan Kundera is a Czech and French writer of Czech origin who has lived in exile in France since 1975, where he became a naturalized citizen in 1981 He is best known as the author of The Unbearable Lightness of Being, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting, and The Joke.Kundera has written in both Czech and French He revises the French translations of all his books these therefore are not considered translations but original works Due to censorship by the Communist government of Czechoslovakia, his books were banned from his native country, and that remained the case until the downfall of this government in the Velvet Revolution in 1989.


    318 Comments


    1. “I invent stories, confront one with another, and by this means I ask questions. The stupidity of people comes from having an answer to everything. The wisdom of the novel comes from having a question for everything.” ― Milan KunderaNOVEL. The great prose form in which an author thoroughly explores, by means of experimental selves (characters), some great themes of existence.LETTERS. They are getting smaller and smaller in books these days. I imagine the death of literature; bit by bit, wi [...]

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    2. L'art du roman = The Art of the Novel, Milan Kundera Kundera brilliantly examines the work of such important and diverse figures as: Rabelais, Cervantes, Sterne, Diderot, Flaubert, Tolstoy, and Musil. He is especially penetrating on Hermann Broch, and his exploration of the world of Kafka's novels vividly reveals the comic terror of Kafka's bureaucratized universe. Kundera's discussion of his own work includes his views on the role of historical events in fiction, the meaning of action, and the [...]

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    3. I just came across a website called Theregoesanother25minutesyou’llnevergetback and it has a whole new attitude to literary criticism which I for one think is long overdue. They have the following eye-catching picture sections:Can you recognize these overweight authors?Wait till you see what these Shakespearian heroines look like now – Number 17 is jawdropping15 transgender characters from Dostoyevsky no one knew aboutYou’ll never recognize these formerly hot Henry James male protagonists1 [...]

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    4. Kundera is able to talk about the structure of his novel in a way that is both profound and accessible to writers of any ilk. I especially like his attitudes (negative!) toward the mass-production of "market books" which he compares to another form of celebrity culture encroaching on the literary world. His comparisons of novelistic "movements" to those in music are especially profound. The best thing about this book: Kundera's idea that novels are in fact an inquiry into a facet of human existe [...]

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    5. لست فقط سعيدة بقراءة هذا الكتاب وانما فخورة أيضا فخورة جداً هل بقراءتي لهذا الكتاب امتلكت مقومات الفن الروائي ؟؟ بالطبع لا بالعكس، ان كان لدي طموح قديم بكتابة رواية أو اي انتاج ادبي فتخليت عن هذا الطموح بسعادة لكي نكتب رواية يجب أن نؤمن بهدفها و وظيفتها وليس فقط مجرد تسجيل [...]

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    6. I first read this book in the early 90s. Recently I was in a spirited conversation about Boccaccio's Decameron. One friend said that the stories were "enjoyable, but ultimately empty." Now my friend is a smart guy, but his remark struck me as remarkably stupid. It just proved that he didn't "get it." The Decameron is full of laughter – you can almost argue that it is constructed for laughter, and laughter in the history of the novel is a value of its own. Mocking wit, a refusal of piety and pl [...]

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    7. لقد اخترت هذا الكتاب لقراءته بناءً على اسم الكتاب وليس اسم مؤلفه ظنًا أنه يتحدث عن فن كتابة الروايات في محاولة مني لسبر أسرار هذا العالم ، وقلت في نفسي بأنه ربما يكون أيضًا تجربة جيدة للبدء في القراءة لكونديرا ، لكني فوجئت بالكاتب يتحدث عن بعض الشخصيات التي وردت في الروايات ا [...]

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    8. كما كنت متوقعاً ؛ لازمتني الدهشة ورافقني الانبهار طيلة إبحاري في هذا الكتاب !لـ كونديرا لغة خاصة به ، كلماته لا تنبع من قريحته بل من دهاليز عقله ، يدهشني فيه أن كل كلمة يكتبها كأنه يضع تحتها خطين ، أي أنها في غاية الأهمية .وعلى الرغم من كون هذا الكتاب تقني بحت - أو هكذا يفترض على [...]

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    9. I like Kundra because he doesn’t imprison me in a fastened frame of a classic narration. Reading Kundra seems as if you meet an old friend after ages in a cafe shop, and while she/he relates her / his life story, you zip your coffee, listen to the cafe music, hear some chats and laughs at nabouring tables, look at the peddlers at side walk, or a passing tramvay, as life is flowing around,. کوندرا را به این دلیل بسیار دوست دارم که مرا در چهارچوب بس [...]

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    10. This has profoundly affected the way I view the history (and future) of the novel. From Barthes' "Death of the Author" through Barth's "Literature of Exhaustion" (and beyond--to the comparatively Lilliputian debate between Ben Marcus and Jonathan Franzen, the repetition-as-farce of the Broch/Brecht debates of the e20C, as entertaining as they were), nothing else has given me such a clear and, yes, Olympian vista. If interested, see my extended meditation on this book at longform.wdclarke/kundera [...]

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    11. لكي تقرأ هذا الكتاب لابد أن تكون قد قرأت اشهر اعمال كونديرا ( وهذا ما لم افعله ) مثل كائن لا تحتمل خفته ، والخلود ، والضحك والنسيان ، والحياة في مكان آخرلأن هدف الكتاب أولا وأخيرا هو تحليل الشخصيات الموجودة في تلك الروايات مع تحليل آخر لغيرها من الكتب المشهورة وربطها بالتطور ا [...]

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    12. ميلان كونديرا من أجمل المتحدثين عن حقل الفن الروائي .«إن هدف كونديرا كهدف ياناسيك: «تخليص الرواية من آلية التقنية الروائية، واللفظية الروائية، وجعلها كثيفة.»يناقش ويطرح تصوره استناداً على خبراته الكتابية، وعلى أساليب من عاصره وسبقه، العديد من القضايا والسجالات المتعلقة ب [...]

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    13. * Vài ghi chú nhỏ:1. M.K trong "Nghệ thuật tiểu thuyết" viết rất hay về Franz Kafka, và tôi chắc chắn phải đọc lại "Vụ Án" và đọc "Lâu Đài" thật chăm chú. Nhờ ông mà tôi phát hiện ra mình thật thiếu sót khi đọc Kafka rất hời hợt (nhưng không có cách nào tốt hơn ở lần đọc đầu tiên, vì Kafka là cả một thế giới mênh mông thăm thẳm và vô cùng khó nắm bắt). Có thể xem (một cách nào đ [...]

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    14. I just finished Milan Kundera’s The Art of the Novel. There are lots of little interesting things in it, but I’ll just mention a couple that caught my attention.The book was published in 1985, and Kundera doesn’t foresee the end of the Soviet empire. In an amusing bit about translation, he explains why good translation is so important to him. It’s because his books couldn’t be published in Czech. He was an unperson there. It’s a small country and there aren’t a lot of Czech speaker [...]

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    15. Kundera's view of the novel is very much shaped by his own experience as an exile from Communist Czechoslovakia (beware, "Czechoslovakia" is a proper noun he never uses [p126]) . For him the novel is the surest voice confronting totalitarianism: "Totalitarian Truth excludes relativity, doubt, questioning; it can never accommodate what I would call 'the spirit of the novel.'" Kafka is the great prophet of totalitarianism, and Kundera is at his best, I believe, when he describes what he calls "the [...]

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    16. السطر اللي ختم به الكتاب "حان الوقت لأتوقف عن الكتابة، لإن الآله يضحك عندما يراني أفكّر." فتكره الآله لأنك تريد لهذا الرجل أن يستمر في الكتابة للأبد و ألاّ ينتهي أبداً.أهم سبع اقتباسات عجبوني:-"لست فيلسوفاً بل روائياً"الفصل الأول "لست كاتباً و إنما روائي" الفصل الأخير.و "الروائ [...]

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    17. الرواية ككل ليست الا استجواباً طويلاً , استجواباً تأملياً ( أو تأملا استجوابياً ) هي القاعدة التي بَنَيّتُ عليها رواياتي كلها * * ميلان كونديرا يتساءل ميلان كونديرا في الفصول الأولى:هل الرواية غير ملائمة لروح العصر الحديث ؟,فنّ الرواية هو كتاب نقدي قرأت في مكان ما أن الكاتب حص [...]

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    18. What a wonderful day it has been. Cool and sunny, the weather welcomes with only a slim wink of menace behind such. I awoke early and after watching City i went and joined some friends for smoked wheat beer and colorful conversations about public vomiting and the peasant revolts during the Reformation. Oh and there was a parade. I didn't pay much attention to that.Returning home I watched Arsenal's triumph and enjoyed the weather and picked up this witty distillation. Zadie Smith's Changing My M [...]

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    19. تأثر كونديرا بكافكا واضح جداً، فهو لا يكل من الاستشهاد به في فصول هذا الكتاب الذي جاءت ترجمته جيدة.أكثر ما لفت انتباهي في الكتاب فصليه الأول والثاني.

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    20. الرواية هي مستودع نفس الإنسان، ورقيب أطواره وتفاعله مع الحياةوالرواية التي لا تؤسس وعيًا ولا تبث أسئلة وجودية، هي رواية سطحية، على حد رأي كونديرا

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    21. إنه كونديرا يا ناس. العبقرية في أجل معانيها.

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    22. في هذا الكتاب تستكشف بعضاً من أسباب سحر كونديرا، لطالما سحرتني رواياته التي لا يمكن وصفها بأقل من أنها عبقرية وهنا قد اكتشفت بعض ما يدور في معمل كونديرا الروائي.أفضل هذه النوعية من الكتب، ليست تلك التي تتكلم عن الروايات لتقدم شرحاً لها بل تلك التي تعرض لنا كواليس أعمالهم.

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    23. قراءة متأنية حتى الصفحة 66 ثم رأيت أن لا طائل من قرائتها بتأني ، تصفح سريع لما تبقى من الصفحات =)

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    24. Tämä onnistui sekä vetämään itseensä että työntämään pois. Pitkä lukuprosessi, joka veti alkupuolella paremmin, mutta loppu tuntui lähinnä puuduttavalta.

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    25. اقتنيت الكتاب لأنني ظننته ككل كتب "فن الرواية" يتحدث عن البناء الروائي والأسس المعمارية لإنشاء رواية أدبيةلكن ما وجدته في هذا الكتاب كان مختلفمختلف إلى الحد الذي أمتعني وأبهرني أكثر مما توقعت

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    26. مختارات“إن الرواية التي لا تكتشف جزءا من الوجود ما يزال مجهولا هي رواية لا أخلاقية. إن المعرفة هي أخلاقية الرواية الوحيدة”يتمنى الإنسان عالمًا يمكن فيه تمييز الخير والشر بوضوح كامل، لأن في أعماقه رغبة فطرية لا فكاك منها في الحكم على الأمور قبل فهمها. على هذه الرغبة قامت الأ [...]

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    27. I saw this sitting on my re-read shelf, along with all of Kundera's novels and figured, hey, I write every now and again, what does Kundy have to tell me about the hows and whatsits? Plus, I have fond memories of wandering around southwestern Czech Republic where I bought this book, getting drunk and attending church.There's a few nice essays and discussions here about codes of characters, meanings, lack of description, and a very refreshing and reassuring approach to the novel as a way to explo [...]

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    28. Bác Kundera vẫn hay ho như thường lệ.

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    29. دوستش داشتم ولی از همه محشرتر مقاله "آن پس و پشت ها" راجع به رمان کافکایی بود

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    30. The Ludic Lightness of LiteratureNo peace is possible between the novelist and the agelaste [ those who do not laugh] . Never having heard God's laughter, the agelastes are convinced that the truth is obvious, that all men necessarily think the same thing, and that they themselves are exactly what they think they are. But it is precisely in losing the certainty of truth and the unanimous agreement of others that man becomes an individual. The novel is the imaginary paradise of individuals. It is [...]

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