Every Kind of Wanting

  • Title: Every Kind of Wanting
  • Author: Gina Frangello
  • ISBN: 9781619027220
  • Page: 393
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Every Kind of Wanting Every Kind of Wanting explores the complex intersection of three unique families and their bustling efforts to have a Community Baby Miguel could not be different from his partner Chad a happy go luc
    Every Kind of Wanting explores the complex intersection of three unique families and their bustling efforts to have a Community Baby Miguel could not be different from his partner Chad, a happy go lucky real estate mogul from Chicago s wealthy North Shore When Chad s sister, Gretchen offers the couple an egg, their search for a surrogate leads them to Miguel s oldEvery Kind of Wanting explores the complex intersection of three unique families and their bustling efforts to have a Community Baby Miguel could not be different from his partner Chad, a happy go lucky real estate mogul from Chicago s wealthy North Shore When Chad s sister, Gretchen offers the couple an egg, their search for a surrogate leads them to Miguel s old friend Emily, happily married to an eccentric Irish playwright, Nick, with whom she is raising two boys Into this web falls Miguel s sister Lina, a former addict and stripper, who begins a passionate affair with Nick while deciphering the mysteries of her past.But every action these couples make has unforeseen consequences As Lina faces her long hidden demons, and the fragile friendships between Miguel and Chad and Nick and Emily begin to fray as the baby s birth draws near, a shocking turn of events and the secret Lina s been hiding threaten to break them apart forever.By turns funny, dark and sexy, Every Kind of Wanting strips bare the layers of the American family today Tackling issues such as assimilation, the legacy of secrets, the morality of desire, and ultimately who owns love, the characters across all ethnicities, nationalities, and sexualities are blisteringly alive.

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      Published :2019-02-22T01:32:31+00:00

    About Gina Frangello


    1. Gina Frangello is the author of the collection Slut Lullabies Emergency Press 2010 and the novel My Sister s Continent Chiasmus 2006 , which was selected as one of the top 10 books of that year by Las Vegas City Life and was a Read This finalist for Spring 2006 For than a decade, Gina edited the award winning fiction literary magazine Other Voices, and in 2004 co launched its book imprint, Other Voices Books She is currently the Executive Editor of Other Voices Books Chicago office Gina is also the Fiction Editor of The Nervous Breakdown thenervousbreakdown and her short fiction has appeared in numerous publications, recently including StoryQuarterly, Clackamas Literary Review, A Stranger Among Us Stories of Cross Cultural Collision and Connection, Prairie Schooner, Fence, and Homewrecker An Adultery Reader She has been a freelance journalist and book reviewer for the Chicago Tribune and the Chicago Reader.


    237 Comments


    1. Gina Frangello's new novel, Every Kind of Wanting, published last month by Counterpoint, is a wolf in sheep's clothing.It is a novel that explores the idea of what makes a family a family through the lens of gestational surrogacy. While all families are strange, I guarantee you haven't met one like this.Chad and Miguel are a same-sex couple who want to have a baby. Chad comes from a supremely wealthy Chicago family. Miguel was born in the slums of Caracas, Venezuela, and moved to the United Stat [...]

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    2. As a reader lucky enough to have access to many pre-pub titles, there's nothing more thrilling than finding a title from a midlist author (whose previous title/s I've enjoyed) when I'm not expecting to. Big authors, I usually know their new book is coming long before I am looking for an ARC. Debut authors, I pick up what looks good. But when I'm browsing a shelf of galleys looking for something to read, and I unexpectedly spot an author I've read before, it makes my whole day.When I spot an auth [...]

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    3. "Every Kind of Wanting" is the story of an intersection between three distinct families and their attempt to have a "community baby." The baby would be conceived using the egg from one woman, another woman as a surrogate who will carry it, for the purposes of allowing a gay male couple to become parents.So far so good. The book actually gets off to an excellent start, as their lives begin to intersect and their visions for the child begin to clash. The best moment for me was the scene involving [...]

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    4. Frangello deftly maneuvers a complex group of characters and events throughout this mesmerizing novel. She works many twists and turns and whenever I thought I knew where it was headed it veered off into new terrain. Outstanding! LOVE!

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    5. Rounding up again. I feel like this author is going to write something truly great at some point. This is mostly very good but a little too soap opera-ish at times. I like that she's not afraid of unlikable characters. Some of her characters do some really shitty things and are deeply motivated by jealousy and bitterness, but I didn't lose interest in anyone. A few too many Very Dramatic Events for my taste but I liked the messy ending. I'm looking forward to more from her.

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    6. This was a great book, but it weighed upon me quite heavily. It interweaves several complicated issues and family histories seamlessly, and Frangello is amazing with words! It's one of those books that really makes you think, and almost question if love is something that can last forever. Really amazing weaving of different backgrounds together.

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    7. Bittersweet story about three families brought together by an early-40's gay couple's efforts to have a baby. Explores the challenges of marriage, parenthood, and family skeletons in the closet. Well-developed, and very contemporary, ensemble cast reminded me a little of Meg Wolitzer's The Interestings.

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    8. Round up to 3.5 stars. Lush prose, but a bit too much pointless introspection.

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    9. An intricate weaving of multiple stories of a group of families that come together to have a surrogate baby for a married gay couple in Chicago. Not all of the stories are about just that, but about the intwined relationships amongst the involved adults a sister of the of the married guys gives her egg; an old friend of the other guy is the surrogate; the husband of that woman and a sister of one of the men fall in love and have an illicit affair. And there are actually many other layers of time [...]

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    10. This is a tender story about a community coming together to create a baby -- family, friends. Frangello peeks behind the curtain to examine the deeper wanting, the kind of wanting that could threaten the deal. But the higher self emerges in each person, and they draw on their own inner strength and each other's for the greater good.

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    11. I actually give this 3.5 stars. The story kept me interested and was well-constructed. I just found most of the characters to be unlikeable. But if you like reading about flawed human beings, this is definitely your book.

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    12. Very GoodThe plot and writing was good. This story has a lot of very messed up people. To be honest, I really did not care for most of the characters. But it is a good book and I recommend it.

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    13. Book about a group of people crowd-sourcing a baby for a gay couple--egg from one woman, womb from another, sperm supposedly from someone else. Interesting characters.

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    14. Love everything by Frangello. Her characters live to the hilt, and her writing does them justice.

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    15. Good story, but I found it hard to remember the names and relationships of the characters.

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    16. A new friend Liz recommended this to me, and I was pleasantly surprised by it. The premise seemed unnecessarily complicated and "Portlandia"-ish: when a gay couple decide to have a baby, they use an egg from one of their sisters, and then a gestational carrier who is an old friend of the other's from high school. The book jacket described this as the raising of a "community baby," but I found it to be much much more.What I liked most about this book was the characters. There are four incredibly [...]

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    17. An extraordinary book. Frangello doesn't just creating riveting characters and situations, she seems to have discovered the alchemic equation to life itself: messy, desperate and electrically alive. The wish of two gay men to parent a child is only the catalyst for the story; every person in this multi-perspective book is driven by a need to repair or escape their present lives. The reader feels an instant kinship with the Merry and Guerra families, from the bitter, privileged Gretchen to the ga [...]

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    18. This was a work of art in book form. I loved it. I thought I might be dissuaded due to the large number of characters, but it was the opposite - I craved each of their separate points of view as the story progressed, finding myself drawn more to some than the others, but still finding truth and relevance in the ones I didn't like as much. There were just enough twists to keep me surprised but not dramatic enough to make me disbelieve it could happen. It was satisfyingly complete in so many ways. [...]

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    19. Wonderfully real and heartbreaking all the same, Frangello's take on the modern family is a far cry from the ABC sitcom. "Everything is all right. Even if it feels all wrong," she writes, all but summating the contemporary familial landscape she artfully brushes with an impressionist's flourish throughout Every Kind of Wanting. While there are some fleeting moments of over-introspection, it's a minor quibble; Frangello captures the complex needs and desires families share with a power and urgenc [...]

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    20. This is gonna get a big ol' no from me. It was justo much and not enough at the same time. The plot and characters had so much potential to be interesting and engaging. Even with no one being completely likable, any one of them could have been a worthy protagonist. Instead, you just get whiny and selfish POVs from every person involved in the story. There were no twists or revelations that shocked me. Everything fell flat. I'm sure I'll forgot about this book in a few days and I'm not even a bit [...]

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    21. This book redefines what makes a family. A cast of characters, some blood related and some not, go through a huge event in life together and figure out how they all fit in. I was so fascinated by the dynamics that I wanted to spend every free minute I could find reading. The characters are all so flawed, so real, that I found myself immediately drawn in. They all find strength and a sense of self in a satisfying ending.

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    22. There seems to be a lot of good reviews for this book and it was highly recommended to me, but it was torture to get through it. I did, though. Too many characterso many back stories; not enough to keep my attention. I promised myself I would finish it, so I did. Glad it's over.

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    23. CharactersThe people in this novel were very fleshed out. Their self doubts, paranoia and duplicity kept me very interested in where this was going to end up.A good read.

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    24. Jaw droppingly excellent.

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    25. The characters in Every Kind of Wanting are so true you could build a house with them. Passionate, flawed, idiosyncratic, and palpable. Can't stop thinking about them.

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