The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success

  • Title: The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success
  • Author: Emma Seppälä
  • ISBN: 9780062344007
  • Page: 259
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Happiness Track How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success A leading expert on health psychology well being and resilience argues that happiness is the key to fast tracking our professional and personal success Everyone wants to be happy and successful And
    A leading expert on health psychology, well being, and resilience argues that happiness is the key to fast tracking our professional and personal success.Everyone wants to be happy and successful And yet the pursuit of both has never been elusive As work and personal demands rise, we try to keep up by juggling everything better, moving faster, and doing WhileA leading expert on health psychology, well being, and resilience argues that happiness is the key to fast tracking our professional and personal success.Everyone wants to be happy and successful And yet the pursuit of both has never been elusive As work and personal demands rise, we try to keep up by juggling everything better, moving faster, and doing While we might succeed in the short term, it comes at a cost to our well being, relationships, and, paradoxically, our productivity In The Happiness Track, Emma Seppala, the science director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University and director of the Yale College Emotional Intelligence Project, explains that our inability to achieve sustainable fulfillment is tied to common but outdated notions about success We are taught that getting ahead means doing everything that s thrown at us and then some with razor sharp focus and iron discipline that success depends on our drive and talents and that achievement cannot happen without stress.The Happiness Track demolishes these counter productive theories Drawing on the latest findings from the fields of cognitive psychology and neuroscience research on happiness, resilience, willpower, compassion, positive stress, creativity, mindfulness Seppala shows that finding happiness and fulfillment may, in fact, be the most productive thing we can do to thrive professionally Filled with practical advice on how to apply these scientific findings to our daily lives, The Happiness Track is a life changing guide to fast tracking our success and creating the anxiety free life we want.

    • ↠ The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success || ✓ PDF Download by ↠ Emma Seppälä
      259 Emma Seppälä
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success || ✓ PDF Download by ↠ Emma Seppälä
      Posted by:Emma Seppälä
      Published :2019-05-16T21:27:57+00:00

    About Emma Seppälä


    1. EMMA SEPP L is Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University and a leading expert on health psychology, well being, and resilience Her research has been featured in the New York Times, ABC News, Forbes, the Boston Globe, U.S News World Report, the Huffington Post, INC, and Fast Company.She is founder of the popular online magazine Fulfillment Daily and a frequent contributor to Psychology Today, Harvard Business Review, and the Huffington Post Her writing has also appeared in the Washington Post, Scientific American Mind, and Spirituality Health Sepp l consults for Fortune 500 leaders on building positive organizations A sought after speaker, she has addressed academic, corporate, and governmental institutions, including Google, the National Science Foundation, and the World Bank Dedicated to applying the science of happiness to people s lives, she taught happiness and service classes to hundreds of students, for which she was awarded Stanford University s Lyons Award for service Touched by the selfless dedication of veterans and the profound trauma so many bring back from war, she conducted groundbreaking research on mind body practices for combat veterans This research was highlighted in the documentary film Free the Mind She holds an undergraduate degree in comparative literature from Yale University, a master s degree in East Asian languages and cultures from Columbia University, and a PhD in psychology from Stanford University Originally from Paris, France, she is a native speaker of French, English, and German She also speaks Spanish and Mandarin Chinese.


    531 Comments


    1. Lately, I’ve been on a happiness-books-binge. That’s to say, I’ve been reading a whole number of books on the topic of happiness. Call it a personal fascination, a subtle midlife-crisis, or whatever, but I’ve been fascinated by what research says we need to do (or think) to become happier. The Happiness Track fits into this category, though it’s a little different. That’s because this book isn’t aimed at showing you how to become happier in itself, but at showing you how increased [...]

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    2. The following is a list of lies we like to tell ourselves in the hope that we'll become more successful:-Never stop accomplishing.-Always look out for number one.-Power through!-Play to your strengths.-Always be thinking about what comes next.-Excitement and high-intensity positive emotions are a sign that we or our colleagues are successful.Seppala has spent years deconstructing these myths and others during her research to find out what fosters happiness, and why so many of us seem to be incap [...]

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    3. About the book: The Happiness Track outlines the simple steps you can take to become happier and more successful. Referencing the latest scientific research, these blinks debunk common myths about how to be successful and set out a concrete plan for you to reduce stress in your life.About the author: Emma Seppälä is the science director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. At the forefront of happiness research, she regularly publishes in the [...]

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    4. ‘The Happiness Track’ written by Emma Seppala is nicely written book full of life wisdom, an interesting self-help title about happiness that can be recommended for reading in couple of sittings and then every so often come back.The book is divided into several chapters each full with numerous helpful advices how to feel better in your life, how to make changes in order to make your life more optimistic and more positive. Also Emma Seppala did not forget to discuss six common myths of succes [...]

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    5. There is a problem with popular psychology which can be summed up in "why explain something simple in 5 pages, when you can take 50 to do it in a more complicated way". This book is a classic culprit. Supposedly it is an attempt to look at what makes people happy or sad, and how they can adopt lifestyle and attitude changes to maximise happiness, backed by solid statistics. It fails however to convince anyone of anything with its poor and very selective set of data, and makes five very simple po [...]

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    6. Garbage. Zero stars. Tonnes and tonnes of filler. I stopped reading it when she first cited Beaumeister's research to support her claims, and then 2 pages later cited Carol Dweck's research, also to support her (the author's) claim. But Dweck's research contradicts Beaumeister's research. And did I mention the filler? An entire chapter, an entire chapter!!!, to tell us to slow down and focus on one thing at a time. Another chapter to tell us of the therapeutic effect of focused breathing. Do not [...]

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    7. Far be it from me to criticize a book about happiness, however, I found the book a little dry, a little too scientific. The key points are to be compassionate, be grateful and kind.

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    8. To read more of my reviews, go to readingandmusingIn The Happiness Track, Emma Seppala, (a Ph.D. from Stanford) notes that in today's society, we strive for happiness and success, but often find both unattainable. We learn that in order to be happy, we need to be successful.We grow up believing that we need to find a passion at a young age, focus solely on this passion, and work ourselves to the bone so that we can become masters in this field. We tell ourselves that the stress, anxiety and exha [...]

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    9. I usually don't read self-help sort of books but this one was different. I could identify with a lot of the situations mentioned in the book and am sure many of you will too. Her basic messages to us are echoes of ancient wisdom - look inward more, reflect, be calm from the inside, and listen. But what makes these tenets more approachable is that she gives simple ways to achieve them. She places us firmly in our technology-filled, frenetic environment and tells us how to cope with it. I think I [...]

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    10. (2/40) ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Just finished and tremendously enjoyed ''The Happiness Track'' by Dr. Emma Seppala. Written compassionately, easy to read, very useful and on-point, the book addresses some of today's biggest problems (such as loneliness, anxiety, burn-out) and gives a clear, scientifically-backed solutions. Having worked with Emma through the Stanford Center for Compassion, I know she lives by every word. She is a beautiful person, and this is a beautiful book. Let it be yo [...]

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    11. Note: I wrote this as part of a book review series I started at my workplace, thus the (slight) emphasis on work.So, what is this book about?Western popular culture teaches us that in order to be successful, we must work without ceasing by using all available means to squeeze the most out of every second, including time management, multi-tasking, and stress management. We are also taught to continuously keep our focus on the next thing: the next step, the next goal, the next week, whatever may b [...]

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    12. With ample notes to the research for going deeper, this is a solid overview of studies on mindfulness, compassion, gratitude, and creativity, and how happiness can underpin organizational and personal success. If you're a TED fan or an On Being listener, you'll find familiar content, if not hear the familiar voices. Some readers, I imagine, will want more of a self-help bent, others will want a focused look at the research, but either way, this is a good starting point. Follow this quick read wi [...]

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    13. I selected this book based upon hearing the author on the Dan Harris 10 Percent Happier podcast. I must admit that I enjoyed that interview more than I enjoyed this book. Some of the key takeaways include to slow-down and be present, to spend time in non-work activities that give the mind time to rest (and to process information), and to more generally take care of yourself first and foremost. I finished this book in a couple hours, and it covers a lot of information that readers of the self-hel [...]

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    14. I first learnt of Emma Seppala when I was taking the Science of Happiness course at the University of Berkeley. (Online). After decades of research on happiness, Seppala's wisdom shines through in this book. The principles she shares, some of those were truly new to me - for example, how to do more by doing nothing. The others about compassion and kindness I had already tried to imbibe. But the art of Wu Wei is my biggest takeaway from this book. Read it once. And practice it as many times.

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    15. Some nice tips for how to become happier. But happiness accelerates success?

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    16. This is an excellent book for anyone who regularly multitasks and is a hard charging A-Type personality. Highly recommended.

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    17. Really enjoyed this book. Wish it had a little more content, but it was definitely worth the read.

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    18. This book was a well written, informative book on scientific research behind happiness. Seppala has PhD in psychology from Stanford, and is the scientific director of an institute on altruism, so she certainly has the credentials that give us confidence in what she is saying. The first chapter breaks down a backwards causal relationship we have. We often think: We will be happy if only In this chapter, she shows us if we flip the relationship and prioritize happiness, other things will come! I f [...]

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    19. Ok here comes a book finally that as a reader & as a book lover,reviewer has made me feel inadequate & inadept on my qualifications to even give a review for this Brilliant,feel good and courageous book.Emma Seppala has just poured in all the years of meticulous research into this beautiful book on happiness & gives a very modern,scientific,rational, extensively research backed book on attaining happiness & has skillfully decovered the myths & complexes that can be very well [...]

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    20. I enjoyed this book, and given it was an audiobook, I also enjoyed the quality of the recording and the voice of the narrator. The book gives interesting insights, followed by scientific research, into what makes people happy. In short, the points that stuck in my mind were: be more self-emphatetic, compassionate to others, less self centered and breath deeply. So pretty much scientifically proved Buddhist teachings. Where, I think, this book falls short is that the book feels like a collection [...]

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    21. I found the book overly short and concise. It certainly makes a lot of important points about the ways and benefits preserving mental health in the workplace. The downside is that throughout the book I found multiple contradictions, and parts were not even researched thoroughly (best example is a brief criticism of the deliberate practice idea, only to support major hypotheses by Ericsson in subsequent chapters). I also had a feeling that it was picking examples to support the main hypothesis ra [...]

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    22. The Happiness Track presents scientifically-supported steps to help achieve and maintain happiness and professional success. Most points that were presented in this book weren't new to me. However, I enjoyed how the author was able to present this information in a unique and story-telling way. This book served as a good reminder to keep my life in balance.While the scope of this book is what to do right to achieve success and happiness, I felt that it did not provide the true disclaimer. Success [...]

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    23. Siihen nähden että en lue elämäntaitokirjoja, luen niitä nykyään aika paljon. Somefeedissäni niitä vilahtelee säännöllisesti, joten ehkä se kuuluu tähän ikään? Tämä kirja oli sisällöltään mielestäni onnistunut, mutta yleinen amerikkalaisten elämäntaito-oppaiden kielenkäyttötapa tökki. Lisähankaluutena se, että kirja on kirjotiettu englanniksi ja luin sen suomennoksena. Ideat ostin kököltä vaikuttavasta kielenkäytöstä huolimatta: Myötätuntoa itselle ja kolle [...]

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    24. It is amazing that we can have so many different books from a variety of genres that all agree: we do too much, we work too hard, we are too stressed out, and a good way to be happier is to slow down and count as you inhale and exhale. Seppala's book is interesting and useful, if not entirely original. I prefer the simplistic language of Thich Nhat Hahn, who gives similar advice without referring to study after study that no one has time to validate. If you'd rather science to simplicity, then t [...]

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    25. I think this book would have been better branded with "how to survive the modern workplace without going insane". I loved the section on calmness, and the section on self interest and compassion was fascinating. But a lot of it felt like rehash of the same "be mindful" and "be grateful" advice that is so prevalent these days. I think when authors write such books they should spend more time researching what is already out there and put more effort into filling the gaps on what is missing.

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    26. Great synopsis of the latest psychological research about what makes us happy, resilient and generally better people! Seppala writes in an easy, comprehensive style. This isn't weird hippy shit. It is feet-on-the-ground practical findings that anyone can apply. Probably this is the kind of essential living-your-life stuff that everyone should know about if they want to survive modern life intact!

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    27. A psychologist outlines a number of ways to be more happy. One of many books purporting to do this, suggesting resilience, compassion, mindfulness, willpower, creativity and positive stress as keys to being happier.

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    28. A very very good book very well written Lots of research but I was able to relate to so many things written and made loads of notes Took some time to finish it off but thoroughly enjoyed it !!!

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    29. There are many techniques I want to try from this book. I see myself as a generally happy person but I feel after reading this that there are ways I can elevate this. I like Emma's style and they way the book is structured it enables a quick but helpful read.

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    30. Eminently forgettable, the book lacked direction. It was fine to listen to, but didn't really teach me anything I hadn't heard elsewhere.Listened to as an audiobook.

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