The Boy Who Played with Fusion: Extreme Science, Extreme Parenting, and How to Make a Star

  • Title: The Boy Who Played with Fusion: Extreme Science, Extreme Parenting, and How to Make a Star
  • Author: Tom Clynes
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 124
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Boy Who Played with Fusion Extreme Science Extreme Parenting and How to Make a Star How an American teenager became the youngest person ever to build a working nuclear fusion reactor By the age of nine Taylor Wilson had mastered the science of rocket propulsion At eleven his grandm
    How an American teenager became the youngest person ever to build a working nuclear fusion reactor By the age of nine, Taylor Wilson had mastered the science of rocket propulsion At eleven, his grandmother s cancer diagnosis drove him to investigate new ways to produce medical isotopes And by fourteen, Wilson had built a 500 million degree reactor and become the youngeHow an American teenager became the youngest person ever to build a working nuclear fusion reactor By the age of nine, Taylor Wilson had mastered the science of rocket propulsion At eleven, his grandmother s cancer diagnosis drove him to investigate new ways to produce medical isotopes And by fourteen, Wilson had built a 500 million degree reactor and become the youngest person in history to achieve nuclear fusion How could someone so young achieve so much, and what can Wilson s story teach parents and teachers about how to support high achieving kids In The Boy Who Played with Fusion, science journalist Tom Clynes narrates Taylor Wilson s extraordinary journey from his Arkansas home where his parents fully supported his intellectual passions, to a unique Reno, Nevada, public high school just for academic superstars, to the present, when now nineteen year old Wilson is winning international science competitions with devices designed to prevent terrorists from shipping radioactive material into the country Along the way, Clynes reveals how our education system shortchanges gifted students, and what we can do to fix it.

    • Best Read [Tom Clynes] ↠ The Boy Who Played with Fusion: Extreme Science, Extreme Parenting, and How to Make a Star || [Music Book] PDF ✓
      124 Tom Clynes
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Tom Clynes] ↠ The Boy Who Played with Fusion: Extreme Science, Extreme Parenting, and How to Make a Star || [Music Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Tom Clynes
      Published :2019-09-11T20:07:47+00:00

    About Tom Clynes


    1. Author and photojournalist Tom Clynes travels the world covering the adventurous side of science, the environment, education, and extraordinary personalities for magazines such as National Geographic and Popular Science, where he is a contributing editor His work has also appeared in Men s Journal, Nature, The New York Times, Newsweek, The Sunday Times Magazine London , and many other publications He is the author of the books The Boy Who Played With Fusion and Wild Planet His magazine stories often appear in Houghton Mifflin s Best American series of magazine writing anthologies.


    259 Comments


    1. Amazing. The only word I can think of to apply to Taylor, the subject of this book, and also the book itself. This amazing young man not only made a fusion reaction while a teenager, has given 2 TED talks, won an INTEL award, met the President . . . wow. But the author also talked a lot about how his family and his education helped him excel and achieve--and how most bright kids have nothing like this. I can vouch for the sad state of gifted education, and I live in one of the "good" states. Whe [...]

      Reply

    2. The specific details about nuclear fusion, the development of the various equipment, etc were rather too detailed for me. I loved the associated information about highly gifted children though and thought that was a very nice addition to the book.

      Reply

    3. The story of an exceptional young man Taylor Wilson who was born into the right set of circumstances that enabled him to keep pushing the boundaries of his interests and abilities. His family, school, and rural town not only allowed Taylor's experimentations with Nuclear Fusion, but encouraged them (he blew stuff up). Sad to say that most kids do not have this supportive environment. The book tells the very remarkable story of Taylor and his family, but also serves as an education text book that [...]

      Reply

    4. At the age of fourteen Taylor Wilson built his first working fusion reactor. He and his brother are super intelligent in the upper 1% bracket. Clynes goes into Taylor’s achievements starting at age nine with building his own rockets and fuel. Clynes goes into depth about the public schools Taylor attended in Texarkana to the Davidson Academy for the Gifted at the University of Nevada Reno. He briefly discussed what worked with Taylor did not work with his brother.His grandmother died of cancer [...]

      Reply

    5. This follows the adventures of the nuclear prodigy Taylor Wilson, but the underlying theme is improving gifted education and helping children excel. The bottom line is that we are failing our most gifted children, but rather than coming off as accusatory, the author encourages improvement. He includes several interviews with experts and cites research showing proven methods for improving gifted education.It is an amazing story and a thought provoking read. I recommend it for parents and anyone h [...]

      Reply

    6. Very interesting and well written. Not just a story about a kid playing with fusion, one of the real strengths of the book was the discussion of how to raise a kid that wants to play with fusion. It was a wonderful amalgam of biography about a gifted boy, a history of nuclear physics, and a parenting guide all in one, which may seem daunting, but the author makes it work, and work well! My only complaint is that the books ends, but short of Taylor inventing a time machine, it look like we're jus [...]

      Reply

    7. Excellent read with the right balance of detail and storyThe author does a very good job of balancing the difficult subject matter and Taylor's story of how he has become the expert in Nuclear fusion at such a young age.

      Reply

    8. Yet to be re-read, rated, and commented.

      Reply

    9. Deep into the book, the author quotes author and education reform activist Nikhil Goyal "Human beings learn best by exploring or investigating, not by ingesting and swallowing facts and figures. Learning should be messy." If you are sympathetic to this thought, then you will enjoy the book.Taylor Wilson's pursuit and mastery of nuclear science is a large part of the story, but he hasn't lived long enough, or had enough experience to be the focus of an entire book. In Mr. Clynes well-written book [...]

      Reply

    10. This is a great book for educators to read in order to understand the needs of highly gifted students. Administrators who question the need to diversify educational programs for the profoundly gifted should also read this book. The author recounts the early life of Taylor Wilson, a profoundly gifted child who was very science oriented. He developed a star in a box, yes, a star like the sun - not a celebrity! He became an expert in fusion by age 14. The book also focuses on how his parents raised [...]

      Reply

    11. This book is chock-full of all sorts of science-y experiments and topics- it's not just a book about some show off kid that built a nuclear fusor. I loved this book because it was really interesting to think that that sort of thing was even possible! A 14 year old fusing atoms together? Anybody who likes explosions and wants to understand how things work (like fireworks, or how a-bombs work, etc) should read this book, because it not only gives you a sense of all the opportunities in our world t [...]

      Reply

    12. Inspiration and moreI had a stack of books sitting on the floor - you know how it is, never enough bookshelves, and happened to grab this one among a few others to flip through. I was looking for information on fusion (and the sun) in general (picking up Sun in a Bottle and A Piece of the Sun: The Quest for Fusion Energy, too). I glimpsed at The Boy Who Played with Fusion and read a few paragraphs, then never put it down. Very fun, quick read, and extremely inspirational. A hidden surprise was t [...]

      Reply

    13. A story of a gifted boy who became a gifted teenager and young adult and ended up being well-adjusted. Thanks to just the right combination of parents and other mentors and a private school he was able to fulfill his dream of creating fusion by age 14. This book is packed with physics and other science terms which I am not familiar with but that didn't stop me from understanding what he was trying to accomplish and the many discoveries he made for the betterment of our world. I couldn't explain [...]

      Reply

    14. Although I lived the underlying story about Taylor and his family, I think this book suffered a bit from trying to be too many things at once. It's a nuclear physics primer, an advocate for better gifted education, a parenting manual, the story of Taylor and his family, and a few other jaunts here and there. I think the book could have used a bit more focus and exploration into some of the struggles the family faced, and maybe a bit less of the nitty gritty of sub atomic particles. overall, thou [...]

      Reply

    15. I really did enjoy this book. I loved the voice of the author and all the technical jargon. I am studying to get my masters in physics so I understood all the jargon; however someone without a technical background might have difficulty or become bored. The first half of the book is better than the second half, but maybe that's because the main character was less arrogant in the first half. By the end I was wishing that people would stop inflating this kids ego. I'm interested to see where this k [...]

      Reply

    16. I so enjoyed this book. I was not sure I would when I started it, but I found it very interesting on parenting styles and teaching styles. I think teachers should read this for sure! Amazing to hear how interested this boy was in a subject, and that he pursued it. Supportive parents. I recommended to a friend that does not have much time to read. She is making time for it once she started as she is really liking it as well.

      Reply

    17. This is an excellent story about the achievements of a young genius physicist and how he was raised to be a highly respected authority on fusion and fission and an inventor of new technologies that are changing the scientific world. This book should be read by educators and parents for the guidance it provides and should also be read by everyone who is interested in expanding their own mind and moving forward with confidence. This is a great book!

      Reply

    18. Fascinating true story of an exceptionally gifted young man named Taylor Wilson. The science about his nuclear physics discoveries felt a bit too detailed at times, but overall I very much enjoyed learning about how his parents and intellectual mentors helped him excel in his interests. Thought provoking read for a parent of any sort of precocious child.

      Reply

    19. Lots of details about nuclear physics and how Taylor learned and grew. Some information about parent and helping children find what they are interested in and nurturing them to grow with it. A good story with some useful information.

      Reply

    20. Great book at a fast pace. Lots of good links/citations in the bibliography for gifted student research. Very motivational.

      Reply

    21. The science quickly got too advanced for me, but I like the way Clynes wove issues about science, nuclear physics, & gifted education into the narrative.

      Reply

    22. In The Boy Who Played With Fusion Tom Clynes writes an interesting, albeit somewhat creepy, biography of young Taylor Wilson. Taylor is different. He is an obsessive child except obsessive doesn’t capture the bonfire of his drive. He is immovable. He is an arrow shot that never quits until it hits its target. He is single-minded to the point of forgoing food, safety, and friends. He is the youngest person to have built a nuclear fusion reactor. To say that he would be a handful to raise is an [...]

      Reply

    23. 539.76409 CLYCD 539.76409 CLYMy summary: This book is not only the life of this talent boy (Taylor Ramon Wilson was born in May 1994, Texarkana), but contain a lot of education, like 10,000 rule or Carol Dweck Growth Mindset, p188 Intellectual overexcitablity, small-c .vs big-C creativity, experts (most prodigies tend to be) vs. creative geniuses, p 235 introverted, sibling of prodigies discussion, emotional development (e.g. how to communicate with normal kids, especially maturity in terms of s [...]

      Reply

    24. Clynes covers a lot of territory in this compelling book. First, it is the story of Taylor Wilson, a remarkable young man who built a nuclear fusion reactor before his sixteenth birthday. His drive, his persistence, and his ability to enlist allies are as important as his intellect in achieving this goal. How he manages to

      Reply

    25. Excellent book. A fascinating true story about how an elementary school kid (Taylor) grew fascinated with science and pursued his love of chemistry and physics by reading and experimenting in his grandmother's garage with scavenged equipment, inexpensive chemicals, and a second-hand stove. Mishaps were rare, but did occur, including with fireworks. But his parents supported his curiosity, and the author states he wasn't certain whether the story has more to do with the Taylor or with his parents [...]

      Reply

    26. Topic bending. There is a surprising amount of biography, nuclear physics (basic), parenting (with research), and child psychology wrapped up in this gem.Because of the topic coverage, there's a lot of room for appreciation and frustration. Biography - Taylor's an amazing guy. His story isn't one to scoff at. Taylor's genius is equally amazing as the young man himself, BUT this book doesn't hide his brilliant younger brother, Joey - the less social, but equally or even more brilliant child. The [...]

      Reply

    27. If you've read my reviews, you'll know that I'm not very generous with my 5-star ratings. This book totally deserves it! I rate books differently than most. 3-stars, I like. 4-stars, I like a lot. 5-stars, holy cow this is amazing!!!My wife is probably getting tired of listening to me rave about this book.Okay, so the title of this book didn't really interest me at first. Honestly, I just got it because it was available at the library, and I didn't see anything else at the time that I cared to t [...]

      Reply

    28. Taylor Wilson is a fascinating young man. By building a fusion reactor at the age of 14 he is the youngest in an elite club of 30 something people who have successfully built a fusion reactor.The book oscillates between biography and an insightful view on the state of American public education which has, for the last few decades, focused on equality of access at the expense of providing sufficient resources for the most gifted and motivated students.The book also offers some interesting insight [...]

      Reply

    29. Overall a very good book. The main issue I had with it is that it seemed like the author really wanted to write two different books but didn't have enough material, so he combined them into one by alternating chapters between an analysis of the American education system and the story of the kid who decided to build his own fusion reactor. The story of Taylor is interesting and inspiring, but everytime something interesting started happening the reader was subjected to a chapter about the educati [...]

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *