Somebody's Husband, Somebody's Son: Story of Peter Sutcliffe

  • Title: Somebody's Husband, Somebody's Son: Story of Peter Sutcliffe
  • Author: Gordon Burn
  • ISBN: 0330319205
  • Page: 161
  • Format: Paperback
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      Published :2019-08-13T18:16:27+00:00

    About Gordon Burn


    1. Gordon Burn was an English writer born in Newcastle upon Tyne and the author of four novels and several works of non fiction.Burn s novels deal with issues of modern fame and faded celebrity, as well as life through a media lens His novel Alma Cogan 1991 , which imagined the future life of the British singer Alma Cogan had she not died in the 1960s, won the Whitbread Award for Best First Novel His other novels Fullalove and The North of England Home Service appeared in 1995 and 2003 respectively His non fiction deals primarily with sport and true crime His first book Somebody s Husband, Somebody s Son was a study of Peter Sutcliffe, the Yorkshire Ripper and his 1998 book Happy Like Murderers The Story of Fred and Rosemary West, dealt in similar detail with one of Britain s most notorious serial killers.Burn s interest in such infamous villains extended to his fiction, with Myra Hindley, one of the Moors murderers , featuring prominently in the novel Alma Cogan His sport based books are Pocket Money Inside the World of Snooker 1986 and Best and Edwards Football, Fame and Oblivion 2006 , which deals with the twin stories of Manchester United footballers Duncan Edwards and George Best and the trajectory of two careers unmoored in wildly different ways He also wrote a book with British artist Damien Hirst, On the Way to Work, a collection of interviews from various dates between 1992 2001 He contributed to The Guardian regularly, usually writing about contemporary art.


    848 Comments


    1. Despite being something of a true crime aficionado, until now I’ve restricted most of my reading to crimes committed far from my shores – for some reason, while the crimes of our transatlantic cousins are never not disturbing, reading about British killers makes it all a bit more real and grim for me. However, having had my interest piqued by a number of true crime podcasts, I decided it was high time I looked at those closer to home and so chose to start with Somebody’s Husband, Somebody [...]

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    2. This must be one of the most fascinating and unsettling books I have read. Rather than a 'true crime' book, this is a biography of Peter Sutcliffe, looking at his family, childhood and youth, through his adulthood, crimes and imprisonment. The book in no way dehumanizes Sutcliffe's victims, but what it does do is show us the bizarre way that the Yorkshire Ripper was both a savage killer and the man who visited elderly relatives at Christmas; a man who helped his father and brother rearrange furn [...]

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    3. This kind of book isn't to everyone's liking. But if you are interested in the psychology of - or rather the clues allowing you to guess at the psychology of - serial killers / psychopaths etc then this one is for you! I find this area fascinating anyway, but Gordon Burn is a very intelligent, sophisticated and careful writer to boot. He manages to convey a sense of pervading menace and darkness in his tone. He also, fundamentally, writes of the people involved in a way that emphasises that they [...]

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    4. I found this book engrossing. The author gives you a solid feel for the place he wrote about and the era. This book focuses upon who Sutcliffe was, where he lived, what his family and upbringing were like, his social life etc. It gives an account of his life between the murders. The murders themselves and the trial are touched upon, but it is the Yorkshire Ripper's private life that the author focuses upon. I read this book with some morbid curiosity, I guess, though have to point out in no way [...]

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    5. As much a book about a community at a specific period of time as about the Yorkshire Ripper. One of the few books to give voice to real people and their opinions are laid out in amazing detail. I would think the book would be an eye-opener for those who never come into contact with the sort of people as the Sutcliffes and their friends. Doesnt really come to any conclusions about Sutcliffe himself. Was he mad,or bad, or is it irrelevant anyway.

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    6. Strange writing style but no getting away from the horror of this maniacs behaviour

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    7. I literally could not put this book down. Although written at a time close to the events, Gordon Burn offers a unique and insightful perspective beyond the lurid sensationalism almost all writing about this case descended to.The amount of time he spent with the family of Peter Sutcliffe clearly shows through and, whilst neither he nor we can properly gauge and dissect Sutcliffe, he certainly presents a more rounded portrait that the standard bogeyman trope thrown out by lazy journalists and auth [...]

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    8. Having read a few of this authors other books I read this having little knowledge of the case other than it being seemly ever-present on the news as I grew up. This book presents the facts of the case in a non sensationalist manner but doesn't shy away from the horrific deeds of Sutcliffe and shows how he was eventually brought to justice. However it is also a terrifying snapshot of 70's Britain where the police are ineffective, the media are ghoulish ambulance chasers and most horrifically wome [...]

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    9. The best book on Sutcliffe in my opinion, and I have read a lot. As a child growing up in Yorkshire I became fascinated by this horrific story. This is the only one that delves in to his childhood in such detail. Very well written and a must read for "fans" of true crime.

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    10. This book was extremely well-written and informative and without bias either for or against Peter Sutcliffe.We learn about his childhood, his previous jobs, his deep love for his mother and the women in his family, his love for Sonia (and also how dominant and condescending she was towards him and how she was mentally ill with a real dislike for children despite being a teacher), his love for children and how considerate he would be towards his neighbours . but you also learn about his dark side [...]

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    11. The first 50 of so pages, you never really hear about Peter Sutcliffe, it's more to do with his Parents growing up and their upbringing. It's very easy to lose patience. But stick with it, as by learning about life before he was born, it actually sets up the rest of the book perfectly. We don't just get to follow where Sutcliffe went, we see where he came from.The title is perfect. It really is about a very simple man, it reads just like a biography of your average Joe, but knowing - as I read i [...]

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    12. A well-written, almost novelistic treatment of the Yorkshire Ripper case. Compresses many years of investigation and courtroom procedure into a fairly small, space. This one never drags, but if you've already read WICKED BEYOND BELIEF you already know much more than this version of the story can offer.

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    13. 2.5 stars. I felt there was too much irrelevant information included. Yes, his childhood is important, but did the author need to include pages and pages of his parents', brothers' and friends' histories?

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    14. A look into the mind of a psychopath. It is very easy reading and thought provoking. It did make me wonder about other prostitute murders such as Mary Judge murdered in 1968 at the time that Peter was having problems with Sonia. But that we will never know! Good book worth a read.

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    15. If you like this sort of glimpse into the motivation of a serial killer then you might enjoy this one. I read it because I had really enjoyed Happy Like Murderers (not sure enjoyed is the right word) but I felt like I had strayed into that 'true crime' genre. A bit creepy.

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    16. One of the many books I read during my research into the world of Peter Sutcliffe aka 'The Yorkshire Ripper' for my Masters dissertation. Fascinating, harrowing and deeply unsettling but one of the few books I've read on Sutcliffe where you could really get a feel for who he was. Excellent.

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    17. As with 'Happy Like Murderers', Mr Burn takes a very difficult and real subject and gets the tone just right.He also understands how to describe an English dialect in a much more appropriate fashion than that written in 'Beyond Belief' about the moors murders.A great writer.

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    18. Interesting insight into the life and mind of one of the most evil men on Earth. As child he was pathetic and as a man he was a pathetic coward. Not an easy read because of the content but a real page turner, reads like a novel.

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    19. This is a spooky read. I grew up afraid of this man in my area and this book paints him as a 'normal' if not eccentric young man. Great book well written as its about HIM.

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    20. The Yorkshire ripper-- yikes!

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    21. Fills in a lot of gaps about Peter's Sutcliffe's childhood and early life which are missing from other books about him. Well worth the read, even for those who have read up on the Yorkshire Ripper.

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    22. Gordon Burn is the master of True Crime.

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    23. Truly excellent. The life story of Peter Sutcliffe who happens to be the Yorkshire Ripper and not the other way about.

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