Saffransköket

  • Title: Saffransköket
  • Author: Yasmin Crowther
  • ISBN: 9789151845951
  • Page: 151
  • Format: None
  • Saffransk ket libris kb bib
    libris.kb bib 10136340

    • ☆ Saffransköket || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Yasmin Crowther
      151 Yasmin Crowther
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Saffransköket || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Yasmin Crowther
      Posted by:Yasmin Crowther
      Published :2019-06-14T19:52:33+00:00

    About Yasmin Crowther


    1. Yasmin Crowther Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Saffransköket book, this is one of the most wanted Yasmin Crowther author readers around the world.


    578 Comments


    1. Onvan : The Saffron Kitchen - Nevisande : Yasmin Crowther - ISBN : 670038113 - ISBN13 : 9780670038114 - Dar 272 Safhe - Saal e Chap : 2006

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    2. Lepa knjiga dobra priča debitantski roman Dobar prevod :)

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    3. I don't know why I keep trying to read books about Iran. They always leave me feeling frustrated and irritated. The last one I read, Reading Lolita in Tehran, did the same thing to me - although at least I felt like I was part of a graduate-level book club. It was smart, well-written and academic - even if it did leave me feeling emotionally empty and discouraged about the Middle East. This book, The Saffron Kitchen was unconnected and abstruse - without meaning to be. The writing is mediocre, t [...]

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    4. This is a well written book which is easy to read and for that I've awarded it three stars as it helped some long commutes to sail by fairly effortlessly and let me tell you, when your commute happens to go through Wigan (land of wind-tunnel platforms and limited shelter), this is no mean feat. I suspect that a lot of the description and some of the experiences in the book are somewhat autobiographical with Crowther drawing on her own background and experience of a one-step-removed Iranian Cultu [...]

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    5. After a terrible accident causes Sara to lose her baby, an accident she blames her mother Maryam for, Maryam in her grief and guilt leaves England for her home country of Iran, and the village of Mazareh where she was once, as a girl, the happiest. But the past cannot be outrun, and Sara is left struggling to understand her moody mother, the things she said, and what secrets she is keeping so tightly to herself. When Maryam invites Sara to join her in Mazareh, Sara goes thinking - hoping - she'l [...]

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    6. This book is about an Iranian woman whose traumatic experiences during childhood completely alter the course of her life and ultimately affect the family she has built in a foreign land. Crowther really understands Iran and Iranians; she gets the details - the saffron, the gold bangles, the tea from samovars - and she gets the big issues - especially the family name. For a first novel, I'm impressed.

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    7. I listened to this as an audio book. The two narrators were quite good. The story is basically Maryam's, an Iranian woman who came to live in London when she was a young woman. As the story opens her daughter Sara is pregnant and Maryam's young nephew has just arrived to live with his aunt. Sara loses her baby as an indirect result of Maryam bullying her nephew Said. Maryam then abruptly departs the country and returns to Iran.The story has three narratives; Maryam as a young woman living in Ira [...]

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    8. I'm loving this book. It's emotionally a bit intense. I keep wanting to switch the pov to the mother, right now it's first person from the daughter. Maybe I can just relate more to the mother and wish I could hear her thoughts. UPDATE: I finished the book, and really liked the story. It's a love story on so many levels, love of a man and woman, love of a mother and daughter, and the love a person has for a place and how that is tied up with the feelings for a person. I could relate to the mother [...]

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    9. I am currently reading The Saffron Kitchen by Yasmin Crowther. I picked this up on Saturday in a charity shop, browsing absent-mindedly through the shelves of discarded books, so I approached it with an open mind. It was published in 2006. I haven't finished reading it yet, but I have to say I am absolutely loving it more than I have enjoyed a book for a while. And the Reason? A beautifully lyrical and poetic writing style, and a main character (the mother Maryam) that I can really identify with [...]

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    10. I liked the idea of the book more than I liked the book. But I'm still looking forward to discussing it at book club.At times I was distracted by the differing points of view - Crowther switches from first person to third person and back again. There were some chapters where I wasn't sure who was talking - and even when I knew who was talking, it was unclear the timeframe. Was it present day or 40 yrs ago?At the end, Maryam explains the big secret of her life and it ended up being rather anti-cl [...]

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    11. I recently read a book that was 555 pages when it should've been 250 max, and this book was the exact opposite. The author crafted a compelling plot with characters full of depth, but she could've spent much more time in regards to detail. Though I don't typically love books that switch between past and present time, her writing oscillated both temporally and spatially in the most concise yet emotive way that had me, as the reader, feeling like I was living as Maryam and Sara. I will say, howeve [...]

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    12. I just could not connect with the story

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    13. Intense! Didn't expect it to be this good. It's made its way to the top of my favs. If someone asks me about the plot I'll say it's sort of the Iranian version of "The God of Small Things". Readers who read both of these books will get what I meant.

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    14. This is Crowther's first novel. She is the daughter of an Iranian mother and British father, just as her main character is, and she brings a lot of authenticity to the page in terms of being of two different worlds. I was especially interested to see how Crowther handled point of view in her novel. Her choices, unfortunately, don't always work. In an interview, Crowther explains her moves from first to third person as she moves among Sara (the daughter) and Maryam (the mother), but until I read [...]

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    15. I listened to this story on CD so I could knit. All the ingredients of this book are right, but the amounts could have been a bit different. I wanted to know a lot more about Ali and Dr. Ahlavi, because these characters revealed themselves to be good, interesting, and a comfort amidst all the unhappy events of the other characters. The cruel father needed more character elucidation, also, perhaps as a contrast to Maryam, both before she has to leave her family and is merely a bit wild, and after [...]

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    16. This was the paperback (sorry the record doesn't match--couldn't find it) I carried to doctor appointments for the last month or so. I have that system where the heavyweight hardcovers are on the bedside table, the romances I don't wish to be seen with by the exercycle, and higher-brow paperbacks in the battered tote with the essentials for waiting and waiting and waitingI digress. Saffron Kitchen held my attention though all the interruptions. (Why is it patients can wait an hour, but then must [...]

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    17. This totally drew me in. The main characters are so easy to sympathise with, I wanted to see a solution that would make them all happy.The story finds a family living in Britain, with family ties to Iran. The attempts of the mother to reconcile her two disparate lives, before & after leaving Iran is too difficult & so she lives in the present most of the time. But as she gets older her past keeps affecting her actions, until she is compelled to return to Iran.I found the romantic aspects [...]

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    18. I was very hesitant when I picked out this book, then completely fell in love with the author's ability to tell a story. Sometimes I have a hard time with novels that spend one chapter on one character and then the next chapter is on a different character. I get irritated because I end up liking one character's story better than the other. In this book, however, I found I enjoyed both characters and stories equally. Her transitions were beautiful and equally spaced and thoroughly enjoyable. I en [...]

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    19. I thought this book was a really good read. Not un-put-downable, but very good all the same. The book started off a little slow, but I found myself drawn into the characters and the cultures in just a few pages.I always enjoy reading about different cultures and the potrayal of Iran and its cultures was done just perfectly in this book. The author certainly has a gift at conveying emotion of the characters, especially Maryam (the main character) and as a reader, you really do feel the sense of y [...]

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    20. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. Set in London and Iran, Marayam travels back to her village in Iran, in an effort to understand her past and find the man she left behind more than forty yewrs before. Her husband, Edward daughter Sara and nephew back in London are left to wonder about that life of which they know so little, and if she'll ever return.I thought this was a lovely book, well written, poignant and quite a page turner. The descriptions of both England and Iran - written with such affe [...]

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    21. When a stressful situation with Maryam's nephew drives her to leave London for her home country of Iran, her adult daughter struggles to understand why. There are some nice mother/daughter scenes in this book, but the flashback to Maryam's life before moving to London left me feeling unfulfilled. Ultimately Maryam felt like an incomplete character to me, which is why this book only gets three stars.

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    22. This book is almost comparable to The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns. Yasmin Crowther doesn't quite pull you in to the story like Khaled Hosseini does but it's an excellent try and great first novel. To me, this was a story about finding out who you are, conquering your demons and being the person you were meant to be.

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    23. More of a one-person pityfest would be hard to imagine.

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    24. Picked this up at the Rabun County Library book sale last month. While I read it, Rabun county was on my mind with the fires as much as Iran was with the story.

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    25. I give this book a 3.5 for its ability to straddle both cultures and make it seem believable. The book poses an interesting question: what does one do if the woman that a man loves lives in another country and he is prevented from pursuing a relationship with her b/c of international politics and familial concerns? Does one move on with ones life (Maryam) or does one wait for the beloved to come back (Ali)? Also, the book talks how the immigrant experience can be one of hope for a new safe life [...]

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    26. This is a tough book to review. Recommended by a friend, I chose it for my book club to read. The overall feeling seemed to be the same: it seemed there should have been more of an emphasis on the significance of saffron vs it just being mentioned a lot. Or maybe we all just missed the boat (I did score low on reading comprehension in school after all, thanks mostly to taking things too literally), and at one point I did Google "The significance of saffron in Iran," which didn't really give me a [...]

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    27. The novel has an engaging beginning and story all in all. Some parts are very exaggerated, including Saeed's reaction in the first few pages. The voice keeps changing which I found interesting but it certainly was poorly done. The writer tried to fit Iranian motifs in every single line, which makes it feel like an exotic read but it was just too much. The character of Ali doesn't fully develop and we are left not knowing why he is even so okay with the whole thing. He hasn't seen her for 30 year [...]

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    28. The only thing I liked about this story was the relationship between Sara and Julian. I wanted to feel bad for Maryam but I felt more bad for Edward.The perspectives can get confusing, especially when it goes from first-person to third, then back to first, but I liked the concept of the story as well as some of the descriptive imagery. 2.5/5 it was okay

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    29. Fascinating novel about a daughter and mother. Maryam, the mother, was born in Iran, emigrated to London as a young woman and married Edward. Their daughter, Sara is now married. The book starts with her miscarriage, sent in motion by an accident that Maryam is to blame for. The book shifts back to Maryam's childhood.

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    30. Like the author’s main character, I too have an Iranian parent. He also left Iran at a young age and longed for home throughout his life. Maryam doesn’t make all the right decisions or think things through but she had my sympathy. I felt for her and her early years in Iran. Her past never left her and she wants to reclaim it. Trouble is.you can never truly go home again.

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