Mr. Standfast

  • Title: Mr. Standfast
  • Author: John Buchan
  • ISBN: 9781480493841
  • Page: 491
  • Format: ebook
  • Mr Standfast In the last of his World War I adventures Richard Hannay undertakes his most dangerous assignment yetWhen England calls Richard Hannay answers Not yet forty and already a brigadier general he has l
    In the last of his World War I adventures, Richard Hannay undertakes his most dangerous assignment yetWhen England calls, Richard Hannay answers Not yet forty and already a brigadier general, he has led the charge into some of the fiercest fighting of World War I Loos, the Somme, Arras There is no telling how far up the ranks he might climb if only the Foreign Office woIn the last of his World War I adventures, Richard Hannay undertakes his most dangerous assignment yetWhen England calls, Richard Hannay answers Not yet forty and already a brigadier general, he has led the charge into some of the fiercest fighting of World War I Loos, the Somme, Arras There is no telling how far up the ranks he might climb if only the Foreign Office would stop taking him off the front lines for cloak and dagger work Adding insult to injury, Hannay s latest clandestine mission requires him to commit the most shameful of sins in a country under siege pacifism.In the idyllic Cotswolds, a circle of conscientious objectors has been infiltrated by a masterful German spy To unmask the enemy, Hannay must disavow everything he holds dear Fortunately, his old American friend John Blenkiron is also on the case, as is Mary Lamington, a brave and beautiful girl with the rare ability to turn Hannay from thoughts of war First things first, though before love comes duty, and the trail of treachery runs all the way from the south of England, to a pink chalet high in the Swiss mountains, to Parisian streets echoing with the roar of German guns.Published just a few months after the Allied victory, Mr Standfast is an homage to the courage and fortitude of every patriot in His Majesty s service It is also one of the most thrilling and unforgettable spy novels ever written.This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

    • Free Read [Religion Book] ✓ Mr. Standfast - by John Buchan ↠
      491 John Buchan
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      Posted by:John Buchan
      Published :2019-09-27T05:02:24+00:00

    About John Buchan


    1. John Buchan 1st Baron Tweedsmuir was a Scottish novelist and public servant who combined a successful career as an author of thrillers, historical novels, histories and biographies with a parallel career in public life At the time of his death he was Governor General of Canada Buchan was educated at Glasgow and Oxford Universities After a brief career in law he went to South Africa in 1902 where he contributed to the reconstruction of the country following the Boer War His love for South Africa is a recurring theme in his fiction.On returning to Britain, Buchan built a successful career in publishing with Nelsons and Reuters During the first world war, he was Director of Information in the British government He wrote a twenty four volume history of the war, which was later abridged.Alongside his busy public life, Buchan wrote superb action novels, including the spy catching adventures of Richard Hannay, whose exploits are described in The Thirty Nine Steps, Greenmantle, Mr Standfast, The Three Hostages, and The Island of Sheep.Apart from Hannay, Buchan created two other leading characters in Dickson McCunn, the shrewd retired grocer who appears in Huntingtower, Castle Gay, and The House of the Four Winds and the lawyer Sir Edward Leithen, who features in the The Power House, John Macnab, The Dancing Floor, The Gap in the Curtain and Sick Heart River.From 1927 to 1935 Buchan was Conservative M.P for the Scottish Universities, and in 1935, on his appointment as Governor General to Canada, he was made a peer, taking the title Baron Tweedsmuir During these years he was still productive as a writer, and published notable historical biographies, such as Montrose, Sir Walter Scott, and Cromwell.When he died in Montreal in 1940, the world lost a fine statesman and story teller.The John Buchan Society was founded in 1979 to encourage continuing interest in his life, works and legacy Visit the website johnbuchansociety and follow the Society on Twitter twitter johnbuchansoc and Facebook facebook johnbuchansociety.See also enpedia wiki John_Buchan and Encyclopeadia BritannicaLibrarian Note There is than one author in the GoodReads database with this name.


    871 Comments


    1. This novel concludes what I think of as the original Hannay trilogy, which sees our hero through the course of the first world war, or the Great War as they used to call it. There's an interesting change in tone over these three books. 'The Thirty Nine Steps' is stark and intense with Hannay a man pushed to the limit, fighting a battle he barely understands with few allies until the last third of the novel. 'Greenmantle' is an altogether more rollicking and gregarious work with various allies an [...]

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    2. I enjoyed this book tremendously and it is my favorite Hannay adventure to date. (Or perhaps it is just that I am getting to know the characters better. We'll see with the next book.) The parts where Hannay was spying were exciting and fun reading. There was a bit too much military strategy and action near the end for my taste, but it was minor compared to the rest of the novel.

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    3. Buchan is a bit of an acquired taste. The book is a bit slow at times, and the values that form its backbone are often foreign. But that is part of his charm. I love old books that were once popular. They are the window into the soul of an age.In this one, we have a wonderful view of the tensions between pacifism and patriotism, socialism and class expectations in WWI Britain. Much of this is quite illuminating, and by itself makes the book worth reading. (In order to worm his way into a spy rin [...]

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    4. Tears galore for me at the finish of this splendid tale: also a wonderful examination of people under the pressure of strife and war."In this nail-biting adventure story, Hannay must outwit a foe far more intelligent than himself; muster the courage to propose to the lovely, clever Mary Lamington; and survive a brutal war. Although Mr. Standfast is a sequel to The Thirty-Nine Steps, it offers far more characterisation and philosophy than the earlier book. For its pace and suspense, its changes o [...]

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    5. From BBC Radio 4:Agent Richard Hannay hunts his nemesis, the head of a First World War German spy ring. Stars David Robb and Clive Merrison.

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    6. More than a bit convoluted and ridiculous, but what are you gonna do? It's John Buchan and an engaging story.In the third of the five Richard Hannay novels, Dick, now a Brigadier General, is recalled from leading his troops on the Western front in the Great War in order to take part in a top secret spy mission. There's a German posing as a Brit in the British countryside, and Hannay adopts the pose of a pacifist in order to smell him out.Before much smelling happens, the nearly-forty Dick Hannay [...]

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    7. The third of the Richard Hannay novels beginning with The 39 Steps, Mr. Standfast may be the weakest of the series. Like the second book, Greenmantle, it is set during WWI, and once again Hannay is pulled off the front lines with orders to infiltrate a German espionage ring. Although Mr. Standfast has some exciting set pieces, like Hannay's tramp over the Isle of Skye, off Scotland's coast, and his breakneck drive and later glacier climb through the Alps, the novel suffers from too many of these [...]

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    8. This story was published in 1919 and appears to have been written either during or just at the end of the First War. It cries out with details and emotion that was still hot at the time of writing. It reads to me as a report on the battles by someone who was there and the report given while it was all fresh in his mind. The anti-German rhetoric is what you would expect but is tempered occasionally with remarks praising German organisation, determination, and hard work. The villain, whom we know [...]

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    9. After reading Mr. Standfast, it's clear I should read Pilgrim's Progress, as it plays an important part in the story. Mr. Standfast is a character in Pilgrim's Progress, one to whom a character in Mr. Standfast the book aspires. Confusing until you've read a mile in their shoes. Or something.Mr. Standfast appears to be the third book in a series set before and during World War I. The previous two books are THE THIRTY-NINE STEPS and Greenmantle, and subsequent ones are The Three Hostages and The [...]

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    10. What is it with series? I just don't like them, that's what. This third Richard Hannay book was a bit of a letdown, but I couldn't bring myself to rate it two stars. Really, I'd say 2-1/2. There were some exciting passages in this book, but overall I found that the faults exhibited in the two earlier Hannay tales, namely a tendency to pontificate on character, fate, and philosophy plus a heavy reliance on coincidence to advance the plot were more pronounced here. Buchan also makes frequent refer [...]

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    11. Mr Standfast, published in 1919, was the third of John Buchan’s Richard Hannay espionage novels.The success of The Thirty-Nine Steps had taken Buchan by surprise. Buchan was himself an interesting character who wrote some great weird fiction as well as works of serious history. He was created Baron Tweedsmuir in 1935 and ended up as Governor-General of Canada.Richard Hannay is commanding an infantry brigade on the Western Front when he finds himself once again, somewhat against his will, assig [...]

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    12. This is the kind of book I would never normally read but I was led to it because i read in another book that parts of it were set in the early days of Letchworth Garden City and I have a historical interest in that. I believe the protagonist Richard Hannay features in other of Buchan's books and he is certainly well drawn. The book I suppose is best described as an action thriller, a tale of espionage and battle in World War 1. There are lots of twists and turns and predictably a romance along t [...]

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    13. Mr Standfast is the third book in the John Hannay thriller/ spy series written by John Buchan. The first two, The 39 Steps and Greenmantle, were both excellent and this third story follows easily with another excellent, well-paced, thriller. In this story, John Hannay, now a General in the British Army is called back from the front (WWI) to help find an old adversary. The Germans are infiltrating pacifist factions and using these people to help their ends, as a conduit for passing information, a [...]

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    14. Read aloud. My favourite Buchan, well, at least, my favourite Hannay Buchan (Greenmantle is a close second). "A man's courage is like a horse that refuses a fence; you have got to take him by the head and cram him at it again. If you don't, he will funk worse next time. I hadn't enough courage to be able to take chances with it, though I was afraid of many things, the thing I feared most mortally was being afraid."Chesterton said that a good soldier fights not so much because he hates the enemy, [...]

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    15. I found this 3rd installment of the Richard Hannay story gripping! Although it could probably be read as a stand-alone, it does refer to the first two books of the series: The Thirty-nine Steps and Greenmantle, and I would strongly recommend starting with the first book.

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    16. Another thrilling, fast-paced, WWI novel by Buchan featuring the adventures of Richard Hannay and his associates Pieter Pienaar, John Blenkiron and Mary Lamington. This time Hannay tracks down German spies and his main opponent is a master of disguise called Ivery who pursues him through Europe With, as a bit of an unusual backdrop, 'The Pilgrim's Progress'Though a bit overly descriptive at times, this classic war adventure novel is loaded with action, adventure and excitmement on every page

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    17. Buchan really lets his politics show through in this one. There are passages in this book where Dick Hannay takes a back seat and Buchan steps into the lead role, damning socialism, labor unions, and especially pacifists. Once Hannay slips back into the book, the narrative regains it strength and the plot surpasses that of Greenmantle, and at times the pace resembles the breakneck chase of 39 steps. All in all, good bookjust don't take Buchan too seriously.

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    18. Despite its age, (published in 1919, almost one hundred years ago), this was a gripping book which I found hard to put down. The battles of the First World War were mentioned a lot and the names all meant something to me - third battle of Ypres, Polygon Wood, the Somme, Amiens, etc. And the German spy that the Intelligence Service was trying to catch was very slippery. Richard Hannay got himself into and out of a number of difficulties. Highly recommended.

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    19. Very suspenseful. This book's strong point is the suspense, although I like the character of Richard Hannay. Overall, very worth reading, and probably you'll have to read it all at once, but it's not as good as the first book, the 39 Steps, partly because the ending was slightly drawn out and then suddenly cut off. I guess it was permissible, but I didn't prefer it.

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    20. Another thrilling yarn by John Buchan!

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    21. If you're interested in Mr. Standfast, you first need to read The Thirty-Nine Steps and Greenmantle, the previous two adventures starring Richard Hannay. These other books will introduce you to many of the supporting characters found here and are essential for understanding parts of this plot.As for Mr. Standfast, its highs are very high, but its doldrums are dull indeed, and there are large portions of this book that run on far too long, even by the standards of the 1910s when it was written. I [...]

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    22. Kindled for free: Not quite as good as Green Mantle or thirty-nine steps, but quite good still. Four quotes! :(Patriotic love of England. Curious both for its affect on the author and its affect on the reader!)But most of us Americans have gotten a grip on your Old Country. You'll find us mighty respectful to other parts of your Empire, but we say anything we damn well please about England. You see, we know her that well and like her that well, we can be free with her. 'It's like,' he concluded [...]

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    23. I used to be a fan of Buchan, but now more than 15 years afer I read 39 steps, his characters are all too stereotype and his world view too preoccupied to be really interesting. Eventhough, his stories are still enjoyable.This story took 100 pages before something happened and could well have ended after the spy was catched, but lingers on for 50 more pages. So actually half of the story was good, the other half was too long.

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    24. This is the 3rd installment of the Richard Hannay series. Hannay is a General of infantry troops in Africa when he is called to go undercover to flush out a German spy ring. The book does a good job n character development and the scenes and action are very good. The book does have its slow spots but I have never read a book that is non stop action front to back. So far I thing that this is the best book of the series.

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    25. Third in the series where Richard Hannay, now General Hannay, enters the Secret Service during WWI. He is working as an undercover pacifist in Britain. to bring down the Boche regime operating in the UK. The story takes us through Scotland, Switzerland, Italy and France and the trenches. Good story, rather rambling and indirect a times but it was written a 100 years ago. 3.5 stars.

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    26. An exciting and thought provoking read An excellent read if you like old fashioned adventure stories, even if at times a bit far fetched but overall the story carries you along. One of Buchan's best, I think.

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    27. Perhaps the best of the Richard Hannay books. Alas, Buchan's wonderful yarns can seem tarnished by his Imperialist and pro-war views, but seen in context, they are first rate.

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    28. Too much Pilgrim's Progress

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    29. I read this one to get to book 4. This is where he meets his wife. It turned out to be a good story, not just a continuation. Next up will be The Three Hostages.

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    30. this one was ok it was not as good in regards to intrigue. I think I missed the part where they caught the bad guy.

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