The Triumph of Time

  • Title: The Triumph of Time
  • Author: James Blish
  • ISBN: 9780380202799
  • Page: 206
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • The Triumph of Time In the era of ANTI MATTERWhen the scientists of the wandering planet HE in their journeys through the furthest reaches of inter galactic space heard the sounds of hydrogen atoms coming into existence
    In the era of ANTI MATTERWhen the scientists of the wandering planet HE in their journeys through the furthest reaches of inter galactic space heard the sounds of hydrogen atoms coming into existence out of NOTHING, they realized that they had accidentally discovered the birthplace of continuous creation.But they didn t know until later, much later, that they had uncovIn the era of ANTI MATTERWhen the scientists of the wandering planet HE in their journeys through the furthest reaches of inter galactic space heard the sounds of hydrogen atoms coming into existence out of NOTHING, they realized that they had accidentally discovered the birthplace of continuous creation.But they didn t know until later, much later, that they had uncovered mankind s Day of Judgement.Following up the Hevian s discovery, scientists of New Earth learned of the existence of a Universe based on Anti Matter energy a chemical and physical structure so antagonistic to their own Universe that the slightest contact meant instantaneous oblivion for both worlds.In desperation, the scientists joined forces to create a missile to explore this mysterious and hostile Anti Matter Universe.But when the missile returned the scientists learned one awesome fact In three years time the two Universes were doomed to inevitable, catastrophic collision

    • Best Read [James Blish] ☆ The Triumph of Time || [Sports Book] PDF ☆
      206 James Blish
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      Published :2019-04-10T11:16:44+00:00

    About James Blish


    1. James Benjamin Blish East Orange, New Jersey, May 23, 1921 Henley on Thames, July 30, 1975 was an American author of fantasy and science fiction Blish also wrote literary criticism of science fiction using the pen name William Atheling Jr.In the late 1930 s to the early 1940 s, Blish was a member of the Futurians.Blish trained as a biologist at Rutgers and Columbia University, and spent 1942 1944 as a medical technician in the U.S Army After the war he became the science editor for the Pfizer pharmaceutical company His first published story appeared in 1940, and his writing career progressed until he gave up his job to become a professional writer.He is credited with coining the term gas giant, in the story Solar Plexus as it appeared in the anthology Beyond Human Ken, edited by Judith Merril The story was originally published in 1941, but that version did not contain the term Blish apparently added it in a rewrite done for the anthology, which was first published in 1952 Blish was married to the literary agent Virginia Kidd from 1947 to 1963.From 1962 to 1968, he worked for the Tobacco Institute.Between 1967 and his death from lung cancer in 1975, Blish became the first author to write short story collections based upon the classic TV series Star Trek In total, Blish wrote 11 volumes of short stories adapted from episodes of the 1960s TV series, as well as an original novel, Spock Must Die in 1970 the first original novel for adult readers based upon the series since then hundreds have been published He died midway through writing Star Trek 12 his wife, J.A Lawrence, completed the book, and later completed the adaptations in the volume Mudd s Angels.Blish lived in Milford, Pennsylvania at Arrowhead until the mid 1960s In 1968, Blish emigrated to England, and lived in Oxford until his death in 1975 He is buried in Holywell Cemetery, Oxford, near the grave of Kenneth Grahame.


    939 Comments


    1. The city of New York has now settled on a planet called 'New Earth', and John Amalfi, once mayor of the city in flight, is reduced to a mostly figure-head role. Until the astronomists spots the newly arrived planet He, a travelling planet outfitted with a spindizzy drive previously in the series. Amalfi goes to meet with the scientist of He, and returns with the news that the Hevians have discovered a point in space which indicates the collision of two universes. The matter-antimatter collision [...]

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    2. As I argue in my review of They Shall Have Stars, the first volume in this series, what Blish really enjoyed was creating new heresies. If he'd been born a few hundred years earlier, he'd probably have ended up being burned at the stake. As it was, he became a pulp SF writer, which I guess is slightly less painful.The theme in A Clash of Cymbals is nothing less than the end of the Universe. The rest of this review is available elsewhere (the location cannot be given for policy reasons)

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    3. The Triumph of Time a.k.a. A Clash of Cymbals. Cities in Flight #4The fourth and final book in the Cities in Flight omnibus, this is the end of the universe. In style this is very much like the third in the series. In the beginning it seems a little disjointed; conversations are sometimes a little baffling. There is the occasional spate of technobabble. After slogging around for awhile, it finally gets going. And then the universe ends, and so does the novel.

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    4. I give the author high marks for the latter part of the novel's idea of the end and re-beginning of the universe. But as with the Earthman, the dialogue and character development is often strained with underdevelopment and constrained by sections of technobabble. The love relationship with Amalfi and Dee doesn't work.

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    5. James Blish’s Cities in Flight is a series of four novels that documents Earth’s discovery of technology that allows them to achieve long distance space travel and the ramifications of Earthlings traveling the galaxy and beyond.The series comes to a crashing conclusion with this final installment. The city of New York has settled on “New Earth.” Another traveling planet, He, engages with the city to discuss their discovery of a point in space that indicates the collision of two universes [...]

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    6. This is one of my all-time favorite books . I like Blish mostly because the science is sensible and maybe even possible someday, like the Spindizzy space drive which is based on the actual physics book Dirac Equation, postulating a way to use angular momentum of electrons to create a gravity field that the drive 'falls into' at greater than light speed (being a math nerd does come in handy sometimes!). In a not too distant future, humans use this drive to lift entire cities into space inside a s [...]

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    7. The Cities in Flight series rank alongside Asimov's Foundation Trilogy as classic works of science fiction where the writing is more than touch clunky, but the ideas are so magnificent, you don't care. When you come to this, the final book in the series, it follows the worst of the four, but this time the reader gets something very different.For a start there is a lot more consideration of character than in the earlier books. Sometimes a bit heavy handed, but it's there - and the characters have [...]

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    8. After New York's travails, then land on a distant planet and take over, only to have the 1st planet they launched (in the previous book) turn up with a suddenly (well, not too suddenly, it's about 150 years later) high tech culture that has discovered the universe is going to collide with the anti-matter universe and reset itself in a couple years. They race to the center of the galaxy to try to control the process, and seem to succeed, but its not entirely clear. While the addition of a couple [...]

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    9. Works well as a conclusion to this epic cycle of novels. That said, I feel like the first two volumes of the series worked better as stories than the last two; there are lots of interesting ideas in there, but they don't always manage to play out as compelling fiction, and the ideas about how humanity will change with near immortality alternately seemed under-portrayed in the characters, or changed them until they weren't compelling human characters anymore.

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    10. Chronologically the last of James Blish's Cities in Flight series, The Triumph of Time (UK title A Clash of Cymbals) goes out with a bang, literally. The stakes? Nothing less than the end of the universe itself. This final entry of the series is a more cerebral book than the rest and I got entirely swept up into the different concepts Blish was presenting. I absolutely loved it!

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    11. This book has the most cosmic ending of all – the characters try to survive a few seconds after the end of the universe (when the anti-matter universe collides with the positive matter universe) by finding the exact center of the collision and then each surviving character becomes his own universe inside the spacesuit and gets to begin Genesis anew. That’s the most ambitious plot line for a science fiction book I ever read.

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    12. In the conclusion to the Cities in Flight series, the population of New York have done fairly well for themselves since establishing a more stationary home at the end of the previous book. However, they soon find themselves challenged by both a band of religious fanatics and the pending end of the universe.

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    13. I feel this series has been a bit overrated. I have enjoyed it though. I still find there is only one character, but I wanted to see it through. This series can drone on, but it has its merits and I am glad to have read it.

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    14. Really, some of the ideas are interesting. I just wish someone else had done the actual writing.

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    15. An good conclusion to a series that was of variable quality. Quite philisophical as they contemplate the certain end to time itself. Some of the physics went over my head though.

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    16. I enjoyed the "Cities in flight" series, but I can only just recall this novel. By the end of the series, it was getting all a little abstract.

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    17. A little clunky but flooded with ideas as people faced with the end of the universe plot, not their survival, but their continuation.

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    18. 1981 grade B2009 grade C-The story is a postscript written after the two main books. It can be skipped.aka Clash of Cymbals (which I like better)Series book C3

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