Beorn the Proud

  • Title: Beorn the Proud
  • Author: Madeleine A. Polland Joan Coppa Drennen
  • ISBN: 9781883937089
  • Page: 422
  • Format: Paperback
  • Beorn the Proud Two cultures two faiths struggle against each other in this exciting story by Madeleine Polland You can almost hear the clash of arms and taste the Great Hall feasts in this authentic recreation of
    Two cultures, two faiths, struggle against each other in this exciting story by Madeleine Polland You can almost hear the clash of arms and taste the Great Hall feasts in this authentic recreation of 9th century Europe, when Viking raiders ravaged the coasts of Ireland Amid the battles and shipwrecks and deeds of bravery and treachery, twelve year old Beorn learns ChristTwo cultures, two faiths, struggle against each other in this exciting story by Madeleine Polland You can almost hear the clash of arms and taste the Great Hall feasts in this authentic recreation of 9th century Europe, when Viking raiders ravaged the coasts of Ireland Amid the battles and shipwrecks and deeds of bravery and treachery, twelve year old Beorn learns Christian humility from his young captive, Ness, the daughter of an Irish chieftain Youngsters will enjoy the adventure, while their parents appreciate the realism.

    • Best Read [Madeleine A. Polland Joan Coppa Drennen] ☆ Beorn the Proud || [Psychology Book] PDF ç
      422 Madeleine A. Polland Joan Coppa Drennen
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Madeleine A. Polland Joan Coppa Drennen] ☆ Beorn the Proud || [Psychology Book] PDF ç
      Posted by:Madeleine A. Polland Joan Coppa Drennen
      Published :2019-03-09T10:51:01+00:00

    About Madeleine A. Polland Joan Coppa Drennen


    1. Madeleine Polland who also wrote as Frances Adrian was born in Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland, on May 31, 1918.Madeleine was educated at Hitchin Girls Grammar School, Herfordshire, from 1929 to 1937.After leaving school, she served in the Women s Auxiliary Air Force, and shortly after leaving married Arthur Joseph Polland in 1946.Madeleine Polland has written several books for children and many novels for adults Her first book for young readers, CHILDREN OF THE RED KING, was published in the UK by Constable in 1960.


    207 Comments


    1. I'm wavering between a 4 and a 5 for this one, actually, because I loved it so much when I read it as a young teen. I reread it fairly recently, after purchasing it for our library. It's a solid, character-based adventure about a young Irish girl who is taken captive by a Viking boy her age and brought to Denmark. On rereading it as an adult, I enjoyed it almost as much as I had as a teenager. Ness is a wonderful character, and she and Beorn strike sparks off each other in a very believable way. [...]

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    2. I read this awhile ago but I remember that it was a great story. Paganism was squashed like a bug by the girl who was Catholic. Beautiful story.

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    3. it was good but definitely not my favorite book ever. Sometimes it was boring but it kept me mostly interested.

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    4. It was a good book for kids between 4th and 7th grade. It has a happy ending and is full of interesting events but it's definitely not my favorite book ever.

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    5. Would've been a "meh" story at best if it weren't for the constant preaching. It really ruined the book. The writing was mediocre, the concept is pretty good, but it wasn't executed as well as it could have. 0.5 stars. :(

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    6. Giuli: Ness an Irish girl tries to bring Beorn a Viking to Christianity. Read this book to find out how Ness deals with an arrogant boy! ( I feel kinship with Ness, I am irish, a girl, and Christian!) I would have written more (and I did) but Safari quit and did not save my huge review (waaah). Even that did not capture the awesomeNESS (haha) of it, so I guess you will just have to get this book and read it! :)

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    7. Can't seem to find the Dutch version of it on here for some reason, but I read this in Dutch when I was a teenager and I have since always loved it! I've always rememberd the story of Ness and how she was taken to Denmark and forced to live with, and work for, the vikings. Ness and Beorn have a really special connection from the beginning I think and it was wonderful to read about. I would probably still like it if I read it again. Such an underrated book!

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    8. This adventure is told through the eyes of a 9th century Irish girl, Ness, who is kidnapped by a Viking Sea-Captain's son after the raid of their village. She gradually becomes friends with him after the two struggle to learn of the differences in one another's cultures. Tenacious Ness and prideful Beorn provide entertaining dialogue! While it is not challenging to convince a young man to read exciting Viking adventures, this book was equally enjoyed by my daughter.Comment Comment

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    9. Satisfying and well-written with believable characters and exciting plot. The descriptions are lyrical without being overdone or drawing attention away from the plot and the character development is center stage. Very readable for the intended age level and above. Violence is present, naturally, with Vikings raiding Ireland and fighting but is fleeting, and the humanity of both sides is presented.

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    10. When Vikings raid the Irish coast where Ness and her family live, the village in destroyed and Ness taken captive by a proud, obnoxious boy her own age. Ness is a spitfire, however, and is determined to make her lot better. She tries to convert the pagan Beorn to Christianity, but his pride is great. Outstanding historical fiction, originally written for young adults, but due to decreasing education, it is also suited to adults now.

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    11. Great book for 11 or 12 yrs plus for study of Northern Europe, Ireland in the Viking time period. An Irish Christian girl is kidnapped by a Viking boy who is raiding with his chieftain father and his men, and she learns to respect him as a leader and a good person among his own people. Really gives a good feel and description of the time period that older elementary and junior high (perhaps older) will enjoy. (used in homeschool with my 11 yr old son)

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    12. This was a fantastic read for us! We read it as part of our Viking History study. Banjo and I plowed through it in over a week. Beorn is a viking who captures a young Irish girl on a raid. Through out the story he goes from being a proud viking to being a humble boy ready to trust in the God of the Christians. This was recommended in Susan Wise Bauer's history.

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    13. Pride goes before a fall. Proverbs 16:18. I checked it out via ILL for William, but even after reading the first chapter out loud to him, he wasn't interested (too many other things for him to read, I guess, like Riordan!) so I read it myself. I hope to read it again when everyone is older, it's a great Viking book!

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    14. This is a children's book that I read to my kids to coordinate with our history studies. It was well written and enjoyable. The kids enjoyed it and often begged for me when it was time to stop. The story is not true but is historically accurate. I feel it gave my children a picture of what life during that time period may have looked like!

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    15. I think this was a wonderful book, it was very intense. It made me laugh and feel bad for the characters, I would definitely recommend this book. It has a wonderful teaching and it shows you some history as well.

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    16. Awsome. Read it in little less then a week it does talk about battle and just one sentence but such a good book ends struck my heat in a good way and coursed me to write it some bumpy parts but it is a Seton home school book report book for 6th grade

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    17. I enjoyed this story. It was a bit direct in it's storyline - easy to see exactly where it was going, but a good example of pride coming before the fall. I added this to my 4th Grade reading shelf years ago. A good little historical fiction with a lesson to be learned.

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    18. Good historical fiction for 4th-6th graders. Theme: Pride comes before a fall.Pales in comparison to Rosemary Sutcliff's Roman Britain trilogy, but it's also a much easier to read book for a younger audience.

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    19. My first Madeline Polland book. I got it because I have always been fascinated with the subject this book explores. I was slightly disappointed at the plot, which dragged slightly. The characters were good, and I enjoyed the strong Christian message.

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    20. The plot and idea for the story was good; however, the flow of the story was choppy. Though the author tried to explain the characters she never developed them where you would find them interesting. It was like reading a fact book - even where it was fictional

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    21. I think this is a book written for middle-graders, but I was thoroughly engrossed from the first page. My upcoming third-grader was too young for it, I think, because the length intimidated her, but the story was fabulous.

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    22. A good book. Yes, quite. But one I would have enjoyed more had I read it when I was 11 or 12.

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    23. Now, this is a remarkable story! It is very good indeed. The plot is nearly two plots in one, the characters are fine, and the writing isn't bad at all. It makes for a very nice, quick reading.

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    24. this book is great.Read this book!!!!

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    25. 4th grade teaching

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    26. Didn't like it one bit well maybe a fraction of a "smidgen"

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    27. I would have liked to have given this three stars, as it was well written and engaging, but I found some of the passages very lacking, though it has strong characters and a satisfying conclusion.

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    28. Great story about a boy growing up as a leader of the vikings' son! I read it for history and I was surprised when it was fairly engaging!

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    29. Good story, but obviously written for a 4th or 5th grader

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    30. 2 1\2 stars. Read it for school. It was all right but I didn't like it enough to voluntarily re read it.

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