The Way of the World

  • Title: The Way of the World
  • Author: William Congreve
  • ISBN: 9781406946307
  • Page: 448
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Way of the World LADY With Mirabell You call my blood into my face with mentioning that traitor She durst not have the confidence I sent her to negotiate an affair in which if I m detected I m undone If that wheedlin
    LADY With Mirabell You call my blood into my face with mentioning that traitor She durst not have the confidence I sent her to negotiate an affair, in which if I m detected I m undone If that wheedling villain has wrought upon Foible to detect me, I m ruined O my dear friend, I m a wretch of wretches if I m detected.

    • Best Read [William Congreve] ↠ The Way of the World || [Cookbooks Book] PDF ☆
      448 William Congreve
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [William Congreve] ↠ The Way of the World || [Cookbooks Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:William Congreve
      Published :2019-05-02T20:57:07+00:00

    About William Congreve


    1. William Congreve was an English playwright and poet William Congreve wrote some of the most popular English plays of the Restoration period of the late 17th century By the age of thirty, he had written four comedies, including Love for Love premiered 30 April 1695 and The Way of the World premiered 1700 , and one tragedy, The Mourning Bride 1697.Unfortunately, his career ended almost as soon as it began After writing five plays from his first in 1693 until 1700, he produced no as public tastes turned against the sort of high brow sexual comedy of manners in which he specialized He reportedly was particularly stung by a critique written by Jeremy Collier A Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage , to the point that he wrote a long reply, Amendments of Mr Collier s False and Imperfect Citations A member of the Whig Kit Kat Club, Congreve s career shifted to the political sector, where he held various minor political positions despite his stance as a Whig among Tories.


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    1. مسرحية للكاتب المسرحي الانجليزي وليم كونجريف وهو من أهم كُتاب عصر العودةوالعودة هنا إشارة إلى عصر عودة الملكية في انجلترا عام 1660المسرحية كوميدية تنقد سلوكيات وعادات المجتمع والعلاقات الاجتماعية القائمة على الخداع والزيف وخاصة علاقات الحب والزواج التي يبحث طرفاها عن المص [...]

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    2. William Congreve wrote this unspeakably brilliant play at the age of twenty-nine. Then he frittered away the rest of his life on politics, mistresses and gout. At least Orson Welles kept at it and got Touch of Evil made before drifting onto the talk-show circuit and into Carslberg commercials. For sheer verbal exuberance, no playwright in English even comes close to Congreve (well, okay, there’s that one guy from Stratford ). Just listen to this:Out of my house, out of my house, thou viper, th [...]

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    3. What a piece of writing!!Comedy at best! Reminded me ofImportance of Being Earnest , but definitely better than that.Highly recommended for a light reading! Couldn't keep myself from smiling all the time :)

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    4. Tedious posh people being tedious and posh.

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    5. The Shadow of Shakespeare24 June 2017 Here I am sitting in the beer garden of a pub that may not be around for much longer due to the construction of a subway station, and having seen a wonderful production of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead on the big screen (and it starred none other than Daniel Radcliffe of the Harry Potter fame who seems to be doing his best to distance himself from that fame, and I have to admit that he is doing a rather good job at that). You may wonder why I am brin [...]

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    6. Confusing and poisonously cynical. I laughed only a once or twice. This is probably something that one must see staged in order to appreciate.

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    7. Beneath all the perriwigs and face paint they were rather a wicked rabble, those Restoration period aristocrats. At least if this popular play from the period - still occasionally performed today - is anything to go by. Pretty much all the characters are either deceiving or being deceived, or both. With friends like these, who needs enemies?Mirabel loves Mrs. Millamant ("Her follies are so natural, or so artful, that they become her") and would quite like to get his hands on her dowry too, but h [...]

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    8. What, Tony, i’faith! What, dost thou not know me? By’r lady, nor I thee, thou art so becravated and so beperiwigged.Aside from the conspicuous distinction of containing the most English of English words I’ve ever read (beperiwigged!), this Restoration comedy is also an excellent piece of work. I don’t think I’ve ever read a play with such an intricate story. We go from plot to counter plot, to counter-counter plot, as the rather grasping and cunning cast of characters scheme to marry, [...]

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    9. I have to admit, this was a tough one for me. I think I generally got the gist of everything, but I could probably use the cliffs notes for act 5. I did laugh out loud (literally, on the quiet floor too) while reading this play. The sarcasm, backhanded compliments, and wittiness are pervasive in every snippet of dialogue. The character relationships are complex (you should see my attempt at a chart) and a lot of the names look similar so it's hard to differentiate. Overall I really enjoyed the p [...]

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    10. Light Comedy of Good Old TasteIn a pretentiously conservative society, satire may be the most dangerous form of writing. For once, there's plenty of hypocrisy to pinpoint and make fun of, but as soon as one does this, the satirized will put on their priesthood disguise, hold their weapons, and attack collectively. That's why, perhaps, subtleness is usually the satirical's companion in such a case, one which allows him to convey his message of attacking hypocrisy without explicitly exposing the h [...]

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    11. Not sure if 3 or 3.5. Clever book, but not a fan of Restoration comedies.

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    12. *You can read this review at my website too.*Let me be honest. When I had started reading the book, it seemed so DAAAMN confusing! I mean all the characters seem to have the same kind of surname! I mean, how am I not supposed to get confused between Mirabell and Millamant? But once I had started to blend in with the storyline I found it to be quite interesting. The title is kind of a complete summary of the play itself. The play shows the 'way' of thought of the people of that society, the 'way' [...]

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    13. This is one witty, funny comedy I didn't actually expect to like, with characters that would best live in our times than theirs, and demands far more reasonable now than when they were demanded. It is a shame that the play wasn't well received at the time, but it makes it all the more enjoyable for us to read now. The fierce criticism to puritanism through the mocking of characters in particular is fitting to the post-democracy mood of when it was written, and the romance of course, it's particu [...]

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    14. This Restoration comedy didn't tickle my funny bone as much as either Sheridan or Goldsmith. Perhaps if I saw it performed, I would like it more That said, it did have some funny moments and I liked the satire about Mr. and Mrs. Fainall both being unfaithful.I read my print copy (included in "Four Great Comedies of the Restoration and 18th century") as I listened to this full cast recording by LibriVox. Mil Nicholson was marvelous as Lady Wishfort but not all of the cast were of comparable quali [...]

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    15. Perhaps my favorite Restoration comedy because of the strange way Millamant can take nothing seriously and be so sad at the same time.

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    16. This is very typical literature of the long eighteenth century. It was enjoyable to read with lots of silly quips and focus on things that reveal the way society was run back then - reputation was everything, bro.

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    17. Turns out, I'm not a fan of restoration drama.

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    18. There were some really nice and funny parts but it was really tedious to read. I get all the social criticism stuff, but do I really want to read about rich people wanting to be richer? No.

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    19. Four stars for the sort of Restoration comedy it is, but three stars otherwise. Not my favorite period, but useful for that first exam!

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    20. Best to read when you are feeling silly. The names are the best- Fainall, Mincing, Foible, Marwood, and the ridiculous pair of lovers: Millamant and Mirabell. Millamant's demands before she agrees to marriage are relevant:MILLA. Ah, don’t be impertinent. My dear liberty, shall I leave thee? My faithful solitude, my darling contemplation, must I bid you then adieu? Ay-h, adieu. My morning thoughts, agreeable wakings, indolent slumbers, all ye douceurs, ye sommeils du matin, adieu. I can’t do [...]

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    21. I just finished the book and thought it'd be best to write down my thoughts on it. This isn't going to be much of a review, I'm sorry!So, I have this habit of reading reviews of other readers of books that I finish reading and in this book's reviews, I saw people call it as 'light comedy'. Well, truth be told, it is NOT a light comedy! The book is filled with heavy dialogues that are mostly fillers and have no real purpose of being there, except to demonstrate the wit or false wit, in a few cas [...]

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    22. Originally published on my blog here in February 2000.Congreve's play has the theme of hypocrisy and deceit in society, as even some of the characters' names indicate (Fainall, for example). Even Mirabell, the hero (his name indicating that he is admirable), uses a deceitful scheme to bring about the happy ending. Only Millamant, the object of his desire, does not pretend to be anything other than what she really is, though her capriciousness towards Mirabell infuriates him.Millamant is unable t [...]

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    23. Plays are intended by the author to be acted, not read. This is why reading a play can be such an imaginative challenge, and incredibly satisfying. You have to compose the scenes, the characters, and the settings for yourself. You have to read deeply, carefully, and assign emotions and meanings to the words the characters speak. Novels typically give you all of this. The novelist fills his characters' lives with direction. When you read a play, you must be the director of the story. The degree t [...]

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    24. I actually read an online version of this text provided by my teacher as part of my Introduction to Drama course, so this is not the same version I'm writing about, but is the same work. While it is a great example of Restoration Comedy, I personally didn't care for it much. The version we were provided with didn't include any notes or summaries, which I ended up looking up online to help me follow the events, since the language is rather hard to follow even when read slowly and carefully. Fortu [...]

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    25. Why can't books have the dialogue and wit like they use to. It takes talent and cleverness along with mastery of the language to write such a witty satire. I laughed many a time and wish we could use some of these expressions now a days! I find in reading modern literature, most writers have no imagination and will just use profanity and such to convey moods and thoughts. I did find this play hard to follow as the names were all so similar and there were many characters. Here are some of my favo [...]

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    26. One day I'm going to call someone a 'tatterdemalion ragamuffin'. Unfortunately the brilliant, exuberant language is eclipsed on the first few readings by the incomprehensible plot. You need to know what's being plotted by who and why before you can understand what's going on, but that isn't revealed until the end. By which time you've probably forgotten what happened in the beginning because four acts of confusion aren't really atttention-grabbing. So then you have to go back and read the whole [...]

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    27. This play reveals the tough reality that everyone pretends to achieve a desirable matter. I believe that Mrs.Marwood doesn't love Mirabell it's just a matter of complications in her feelings to fill the error in her character and that she is undesirable woman. The same for Fainall he doesn't love neither his wife nor his mistress. Because he married his wife for her wealth and he deals with his mistress just for change and to be connected with the woman kind only. To have someone who desires but [...]

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    28. Although I was a little apprehensive about reading this play because it was written in 1700, after keeping a summary close by for reference I really enjoyed this play. Not only were the situations that the character get themselves into funny, but their names were as well. How more descriptive of a character can you get than naming them names like Witwoud (would be a wit if he could). The insults thrown between characters are always veiled with complex sentences, which I appreciate more than the [...]

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