Bluets

  • Title: Bluets
  • Author: Maggie Nelson
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 393
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Bluets Bluets winds its way through depression divinity alcohol and desire visiting along the way with famous blue figures including Joni Mitchell Billie Holiday Yves Klein Leonard Cohen and Andy Wa
    Bluets winds its way through depression, divinity, alcohol, and desire, visiting along the way with famous blue figures, including Joni Mitchell, Billie Holiday, Yves Klein, Leonard Cohen, and Andy Warhol While its narrator sets out to construct a sort of pillow book about her lifelong obsession with the colour blue, she ends up facing down both the painful end of an afBluets winds its way through depression, divinity, alcohol, and desire, visiting along the way with famous blue figures, including Joni Mitchell, Billie Holiday, Yves Klein, Leonard Cohen, and Andy Warhol While its narrator sets out to construct a sort of pillow book about her lifelong obsession with the colour blue, she ends up facing down both the painful end of an affair and the grievous injury of a dear friend The combination produces a raw, cerebral work devoted to the inextricability of pleasure and pain, and to the question of what role, if any, aesthetic beauty can play in times of great heartache or grief.Much like Roland Barthes s A Lover s Discourse, Bluets has passed between lovers in the ecstasy of new love, and been pressed into the hands of the heartbroken Visceral, learned, and acutely lucid, Bluets is a slim feat of literary innovation and grace, never before published in the UK.

    • [PDF] ✓ Free Read ✓ Bluets : by Maggie Nelson ✓
      393 Maggie Nelson
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Free Read ✓ Bluets : by Maggie Nelson ✓
      Posted by:Maggie Nelson
      Published :2019-09-02T01:21:31+00:00

    About Maggie Nelson


    1. Maggie Nelson is the author of nine books of poetry and prose, many of which have become cult classics defying categorization Her nonfiction titles include the National Book Critics Circle Award winner and New York Times bestseller The Argonauts Graywolf Press, 2015 , The Art of Cruelty A Reckoning Norton, 2011 a New York Times Notable Book of the Year , Bluets Wave Books, 2009 named by Bookforum as one of the top 10 best books of the past 20 years , The Red Parts Free Press, 2007 reissued by Graywolf, 2016 , and Women, the New York School, and Other True Abstractions U of Iowa Press, 2007 Her poetry titles include Something Bright, Then Holes Soft Skull Press, 2007 and Jane A Murder Soft Skull, 2005 finalist for the PEN Martha Albrand Art of the Memoir In 2016 she was awarded a MacArthur genius Fellowship She has also been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in Nonfiction, an NEA in Poetry, an Innovative Literature Fellowship from Creative Capital, and an Arts Writers Fellowship from the Andy Warhol Foundation She writes frequently on art, including recent catalogue essays on Carolee Schneemann and Matthew Barney She holds a Ph.D in English Literature from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and has taught literature, writing, art, criticism and theory at the New School, Pratt Institute, and Wesleyan University For 12 years she taught in the School of Critical Studies at CalArts in fall 2017 she will join the faculty of USC She currently lives in Los Angeles.


    533 Comments


    1. There are some books you need to read because they are on a list, or have been deemed exceptional, or have been sitting lonely on your shelf. Then there are books you need to read because you NEED them, because you need what they say, how they are, what they do to you. My friend Julie Kantor handed this book to me last night. She said, "You need to read this." I said okay. I read it this morning; it is only 95 pages. I wish I could explain why this book was what I needed. It is not that I don't [...]

      Reply

    2. I'm very moved by this book and shall reread it from time to time.

      Reply

    3. Exquisite, lyrical, exquisite, exquisite, exquisite.

      Reply

    4. It’s kind of cliche to say that you don’t choose the people you love. But I’ve been thinking about this recently, maybe because Maggie Nelson starts off the book with this point, that she didn’t choose to fall in love with blue (yes the color). The book continually repeats cliches like this without shame, but then takes it in a slightly odd direction (like being in love with a color) that ends up (because of its strangeness and forthrightness) being oddly effective in terms of getting us [...]

      Reply

    5. A numbered meditation on longing, love, obsession, connection at once spiritual, associative, interpersonal, and physical. Superficially about a color. Wondered what she would've written about "Blue Is the Warmest Color," but then again she's given up on the cinema. The sort of sensibility that prefers "cinema" to film or movie or, certainly, flick. Sexually explicit at regular intervals to keep you on your toes among the obligatory Goethe and Wittgenstein quotation. Acknowledges and dismisses G [...]

      Reply

    6. If we could marry books, I'd already be known as Mrs. Bluets.

      Reply

    7. Thanks to Maggie Nelson I see the world through blue-coloured glasses now.Review to come.

      Reply

    8. this morning i saw a beautiful sunrise like lava bursting through rock and my friend sent me a picture of some blood at a crime scene on a london pavement she nearly stepped in and i read 'bluets'. none of these are connected but of course they're all related, much like the propositions in the book. one on its own is a tree, a star, but together they all make up a vast landscape that encompasses every possible facet of the human experience. reading 'bluets' was like breaking into a swimming pool [...]

      Reply

    9. Bluets is like no other book I’ve read—it’s comprised of a number of extremely short essays, some so short they may actually qualify as poems instead. The book purports to be a meditation on the color blue, but after reading for a while you understand what it’s really about—or perhaps what it’s also about, besides the blue. Bluets is brief enough that multiple readings are feasible, and lovely enough that they’re also desirable.

      Reply

    10. I think it's safe to say the most famous study of color-as-reflection-of-individual-as-reflection-of-society-as-reflection-of-color study was Gass' On Being Blue, which Nelson cites here and seems to have a mixed-to-negative relationship with. For me, On Being Blue is a beautiful little book. Gass' eloquence can't be denied, nor can his intelligence and personable voice that doesn't always come through in his fiction. But it's no Bluets. This is everything good about the Gass study plus more; he [...]

      Reply

    11. ugh."Suppose I were to begin by saying I had fallen in love with a color. Suppose I were to speak this as though it were a confession; suppose I shredded my napkin as we spoke. It began slowly. An appreciation, an affinity. Then, one day, it became more serious."These are the first few sentences in the book; the rest follows in the same vein. Either one finds this sort of thing lovely and poetic, or else one finds it incredibly dippy.

      Reply

    12. “This is the disfunction talking. This is the disease talking. This is how much I miss you talking. This is the deepest blue, talking, talking, always talking to you.” So maybe the problem is that my blue is silent. It does not mingle with quotes, witticisms and obsessive analyses. It is continuous, it cannot be divided into convenient fragments. It demands. It prevails. Its presence is not motivated by occasional cries of torment and semi-connected lapis lazuli facts. It is not a project, i [...]

      Reply

    13. a lot of elegant writing on a sentence level, a lot of interesting observations, a lot of great quotes from famous writers and philosophers, and some neat facts about the color blue but man, just so unrelentingly sad, maddeningly reticent (for a memoir), and HUMORLESS like being trapped in a sad box for 90 pages just you and the color blue and the word "fucking"

      Reply

    14. This book terrifies me, because it's so nicely written and interestingly formed and also so completely vapid. My fear comes from my absolute certainty that over the next 20 years I'm going to have to put up with dozens of books just like this, insofar as they'll be all 'experimental' (i.e about fucking) and 'experimental' (i.e self-obsessed), and 'experimental' (i.e full of literary existentialism), and 'experimental' (i.e quasi-educated), but not at all 'experimental' (i.e interestingly formed [...]

      Reply

    15. I like Bluets a lot. The book is a collection of lyrical essays that I think could also be called prose poems, but they are a range of things: inquiry into other color works, mundane observations, about blue things, peppered with sex memories. Blue is about blue, the color, and the various emotional states we associate it with, but it is also about grief, the loss of a relationship, an analogical way of expressing that obsession and that amputated passion. As a meditation about blue, she also so [...]

      Reply

    16. In short lyrical paragraphs blurring the boundary between essay and poem, Nelson inhabits a color, using it as a landscape of inquiry. The result is both fascinatingly informative and deeply moving.

      Reply

    17. Bluets contains both severe self-doubt and self-aggrandisement. A courageous move on the part of the author, given how frequently people(at least I) experience both poles but fail to recognize that those traits are in the same entity. Maggie Nelson quotes Goethe when talking about how all the understanding of a personal condition doesn't help relieve the ache that comes from it. She writes about all of her suffering, fucking, reading, writing, talking and thinking.Then I lay my head down on the [...]

      Reply

    18. Expectation equals disappointment. I know, I know. I should not have had expectations. What work would not break under such weight? Aside from anything written by Karl Ove Mouthguard? I was excited by the cover, whose cosmic blue seemed lifted from my sparkly blue bedroom walls. I was excited by the form, which upon scanning in the basement of the bookstore in Princeton, NJ reminded me of The Gay Science. I was excited!I console myself with the fact that Maggie Nelson, PhD, was thirty when she s [...]

      Reply

    19. All the stars in the sky.

      Reply

    20. Bluets is a fragmentary record of Nelson’s arbitrary obsession with the color blue. It’s composed of 240 short numbered essays of about a paragraph each; some are just one or two sentences. At one point Nelson refers to these as “propositions,” but really they are more like metaphorical musings. Blue takes on so many meanings: with the connotation of “depressed”, it applies to her loneliness and sense of loss after the breakdown of a relationship (she continues addressing her former [...]

      Reply

    21. Belle-lettrist in the best sense, Bluets moves lightly from philosophy to etymology to erotics to autobiography without landing for long on any one, with blue as connecting thread but also armature for an elegant, decidedly Old World prose studded with “perhapses” and “nonethelesses” and “it must be admitteds” that talks to the reader in an artfully intimate second-person address. The book’s energy, for me, comes from the push-pull between emotional exposure and literary exercise, [...]

      Reply

    22. Ungodly good. What Maggie Nelson does here—investigating and interrogating various philosophies, coming to terms with the loss of a lover and with the injury of a close friend, and the purposeful orbiting of blueness—is nothing short of magic. And the writing about sex? Good LORD.

      Reply

    23. I started Bluets on the train the other week, or at least that's how I remember it. Where was I going that taking the train was the best option? I don't know, but that's when I tend to reach for the Kindle, as at home I have the luxury of carrying a book from room to room, leaving it in this stack or the other, picking up again and taking it into the bath, setting it down for the night after reading under the covers in my cool room.But Bluets was on the Kindle, and so it was read in passing, a f [...]

      Reply

    24. Composed of 240 fragments around the permutations of blue, Nelson's lyrical, bare consideration of depression, sex, music, cornflowers, doubt, colour and more is personal and vast.

      Reply

    25. Bluets by Maggie Nelson is a beautiful and poignant meditation on love, loss, and the color blue, and, naturally, love of the color blue. Blue is the sun of this text out of which radiates the light of the writing, both joyful and (maybe mostly) sad. Loss of lovers, loss of hopes, a friend who has lost the use of all her limbs. This is a slender but dense book, a prose poem broken into sections. She calls upon such writers as Ludwig Wittgenstein, goethe, and Marguerite Duras (among many others) [...]

      Reply

    26. A writing professor once told me that a good experimental-form book teaches you how to read it. From the first sentence, I see that I'm reading a work with an experimental form: each paragraph/memory/fact is sequentially numbered throughout the entire book, so that it reads like a list, or numbered stanzas in a poem, or perhaps a series of axioms in a mathematical proof. The numbering seems to insist that the logical part of my brain should march in and sort it all out but the content keeps trip [...]

      Reply

    27. This is a brilliant little book that does its best to defy classification. Part of it is memoir, looking back on an ended relationship while living in the emotional aftermath of it. What's interesting is how this is explored in tandem with a philosophical investigation of the color blue, and it is this exploration that dominates the 240 numbered section of the book. More specifically, it is about Maggie Nelson's love of the color, and how that love informs her understanding of other forms of lov [...]

      Reply

    28. Beautiful and lyrical celebration of the color blue. Related also to, well, feeling blue, out of loss.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *