Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Battle of Fredericksburg

  • Title: Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Battle of Fredericksburg
  • Author: James Longstreet
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 205
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Battles and Leaders of the Civil War The Battle of Fredericksburg Illustrated with maps and pictures of the battle s important generals Includes Table of Contents The Army of the Potomac had pushed Robert E Lee s army out of Maryland in September after the Batt
    Illustrated with maps and pictures of the battle s important generals Includes Table of Contents The Army of the Potomac had pushed Robert E Lee s army out of Maryland in September 1862 after the Battle of Antietam, but President Lincoln and his War Department wanted the army to continue going after the Army of Northern Virginia after it retreated back into Virginia Illustrated with maps and pictures of the battle s important generals Includes Table of Contents The Army of the Potomac had pushed Robert E Lee s army out of Maryland in September 1862 after the Battle of Antietam, but President Lincoln and his War Department wanted the army to continue going after the Army of Northern Virginia after it retreated back into Virginia When George B McClellan refused to do it, Lincoln fired him and installed Ambrose E Burnside as the new commander Burnside, who didn t believe himself capable of commanding the Army of the Potomac, only took the job because he was told Fighting Joe Hooker would get the spot if he refused With Washington urging Burnside to advance against Lee, Burnside launched an ill fated operation across the Rappahannock River near Fredericksburg in December 1862 From December 12 13, Burnside struggled to get his army across the river while it was under fire from Confederates in Fredericksburg Things only got worse on the day of the battle With the Union s left unable to dislodge Stonewall Jackson s troops on the Confederates right flank, Burnside s army conducted piecemeal charges against well fortified Confederate positions on Marye s Heights just outside of Fredericksburg As the Northern troops were slaughtered time and again on the heights, Lee turned to Corps commander James Longstreet and said, It is good that war is so terrible otherwise we would grow too fond of it As Northern soldiers laid freezing on the field that night, the Northern Lights made a rare appearance Southern soldiers interpreted it as a favorable sign from God and mentioned them frequently in their diaries, while Northern soldiers who saw something far less divine sparsely mentioned them One of the most prominent generals during and after the war was James Longstreet, Lee s senior corps leader for many years in the Army of Northern Virginia Longstreet played critical roles in battles like Gettysburg, Fredericksburg, and Antietam, and he wrote voluminously after the war defending his war record against critics After the war, he wrote an account of the Battle of Fredericksburg that was eventually published in the well known Battles Leaders series This edition of Battles Leaders of the Civil War The Battle of Fredericksburg is specially formatted with a Table of Contents and pictures of Antietam s important commanders.

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      Posted by:James Longstreet
      Published :2019-08-05T18:41:45+00:00

    About James Longstreet


    1. Librarian Note There is than one author in the GoodReads database with this name See this thread for information.Born in South Carolina, James Longstreet graduated from West Point in 1842 and fought in the Mexican War He resigned from the U.S army in June 1861 and joined the Confederate army Spending most of his Civil War service with the Army of Northern Virginia, by the fall of 1862 he was a lieutenant general and commander of the army s First Corps He surrendered with the rest of the army at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865.After the war Longstreet joined the Republican Party, accepted jobs with the U.S federal government, and criticized his former commander Robert E Lee in several postwar writings These actions made him unpopular with many Southerners.


    543 Comments


    1. The Best General commanding troops in the Southern Army. Without doubt the most experienced field commander. The only southern General who could have the trust of his troops. The best war fighter of the day. He had a great eye for the ground. He understood the needs of the man

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    2. Excellent report from General Longstreet.This is a quick easy read. But this is a first hand account from General Longstreet. He does an excellent job of explaining his deployments and the orders he had given them.

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    3. I'm a big history buff and this was a really interesting read. You can tell that the author has done a lot of research as it showed in his writing. Very descriptive with lots of maps and illustrations. Well written and just the right amount of information. I'm looking for more books from this author. Recommend this read.

      Reply

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