A Voyage For Madmen

  • Title: A Voyage For Madmen
  • Author: Peter Nichols
  • ISBN: 9780060197643
  • Page: 443
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A Voyage For Madmen On April three months before Neil Armstrong s walk on the Moon the world watched as a small sailboat came ashore at Falmouth England completing a voyage of astonishing courage and endurance
    On April 22, 1969 three months before Neil Armstrong s walk on the Moon the world watched as a small sailboat came ashore at Falmouth, England, completing a voyage of astonishing courage and endurance that would forever alter our ongoing adventure with the sea Ten months earlier, nine very different men had set off in small and ill equipped boats, determined to do tOn April 22, 1969 three months before Neil Armstrong s walk on the Moon the world watched as a small sailboat came ashore at Falmouth, England, completing a voyage of astonishing courage and endurance that would forever alter our ongoing adventure with the sea Ten months earlier, nine very different men had set off in small and ill equipped boats, determined to do the impossible sail around the world alone and without stopping, to win the race dubbed the Golden Globe Only one of the nine would cross the finish line to fame, wealth, and glory For the others, the rewards would be despair, madness, and death.The men were inspired by Sir Francis Chichester, who had become a national hero in Britain for stopping only once in Australia while sailing alone around the world Suddenly what had seemed impossible to circumnavigate the world alone and nonstop now appeared within reach For nine driven men among them Robin Knox Johnston, a young Merchant Marine captain Bernard Moitessier, a French mystic Donald Crowhurst, a brilliant, troubled electrical engineer and Chay Blyth, an Army sergeant who had rowed across the Atlantic in 1966 but did not know how to saila gauntlet had been thrown down, a challenge they found themselves overwhelmingly and inexplicably compelled to accept.Though the Golden Globe race was the progenitor of and inspiration for the Vendee Globe and the Race of the Millennium, its participants had in common with Captain Cook and Ferdinand Magellan than with today s high tech sailor There was no satellite navigational system, no onboard computer, no cell phone or fax line connecting them to the world beyond or to possible rescuers They survived on their wits and ingenuity, navigating by sextant, sun, and stars Their most sophisticated technology when it worked was a radio.A Voyage for Madmen is a remarkable story of individuals against the sea, of men driven by their dreams and demons to live for months on end in a cabin roughly the size of a Volkswagen To succeed they must endure the harshest of weather stave off unimaginable loneliness in the forbidding Southern Ocean navigate unassisted through the world s most treacherous waters off the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Horn and, time and again, face alone those fateful moments when a single decision could mean the difference between life and death.With a novelist s eye for detail and a seaman s knowledge of the joys and perils of blue water, Peter Nichols has crafted a classic tale of endurance and adventure a fitting chronicle of how these obsessed sailors, in their puny and inadequate boats, undertook the last great maritime featd how, one by one, the sea cut them down.

    • [PDF] Download ☆ A Voyage For Madmen | by ↠ Peter Nichols
      443 Peter Nichols
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ A Voyage For Madmen | by ↠ Peter Nichols
      Posted by:Peter Nichols
      Published :2019-05-02T20:20:42+00:00

    About Peter Nichols


    1. NOT alias for John Christopher Sam Youd author show


    919 Comments


    1. This was the first 10-star book of 2017. What would make anyone want to sail around the world single-handed and without stopping? In 1968 The Sunday Times put up a prize of £5,000 and the Golden Globe trophy to the first person to make it back.Nine men took up the challenge. One of them, Chay Blythe, couldn't even sail, but had rowed across the Atlantic. Only one of them, as it turned out, was up to the challenge, and he didn't want the prize. So what happened to the nine men? Four dropped out [...]

      Reply

    2. I read this book because A) a teacher told me it was his favorite, and I always read teachers' favoritesand B) because I was sorely lacking something to read at the moment.I knew NOTHING about sailing. I still know nothing about sailing, nor do I plan to change this state of events anytime soon. So, when I first checked it out from the library, I fully expected to be hopelessly bored within the first twenty pages, if not bogged down by the sheer nautical terminology, of which I was so ignorant. [...]

      Reply

    3. Peter Nichols has put together a great little book on the 1969 Golden Globe race to be the first man to single-handedly circumnavigate the globe without stopping in any ports along the way. "A Voyage for Madmen" gives a great overview of the race and varying personalities involved -- from professional maritime men to vagabond sailors to one contestant who didn't even learn to sail until he was on his way. Only one person completed the race.I've read other accounts of the race (including the exce [...]

      Reply

    4. The true story of the first single-handed circumnavigation of the world by yacht. That means, a full circuit of the world, alone. On a boat powered only by sail. In a time not so long ago, but before GPS.In 1968 there were a handful of men vying to be the first alone around the world, and a prize was posted, making it a race. Of nine contenders, only one finished the race, and this is the story of all the noble, rugged, hapless and crazy entrants, and the extremes they underwent and went to. It' [...]

      Reply

    5. Die "Vendée Globe" gilt als die härteste Segelregatta der Welt. Dabei können sich die Sportler heutzutage auf GPS, Hightech-Yachten und gute Kommunikation verlassen.Davon konnten die Teilnehmer des "Sunday Times Golden Globe Race", der ersten Nonstop Einhand-Weltumsegelungsregatta im Jahr 1968, nur träumen. In "A Voyage for Madmen" rekonstruiert Peter Nichols die Geschichte von neun Männern, die auszogen das letzte große Abenteuer der Erde zu erleben. Doch zehn Monate später sollte nur ei [...]

      Reply

    6. A Voyage for Madmen is the true story of a eclectic and diverse group of men who found themselves in an inadvertent race to become the first person to sail non-stop around the world. The story is amazing. The group consisted of experienced sailors and those who had almost no sailing experience whatsoever. If that blows your mind as it did mine, it gets worse: one of the men would try to hoodwink the world while never leaving the Atlantic Ocean's nearly unbelievable. Death, catastrophe, and even [...]

      Reply

    7. An wonderfully well written book about the world's first solo circumnavigational sailboat race, from England, around both capes, and back again. Held in 1968, it truly was the ultimate test of will, skill, and nerves. This book adeptly chronicles the contestants, the preparations, and the challenges that they all faced in their attempt to survive much less win the race. Told by a sailor who has experienced the perils of the ocean first hand, it leaves the reader with an understanding of the term [...]

      Reply

    8. It's a fascinating study of personality and endurance and dealing with psychological struggles. And I really like sailing. I enjoyed this book a lot. My one criticism is that it was hard to keep track of who was who. The author included a brief bio of each of the nine sailors in the beginning to help, which I kept flipping back to for the first half of the book. Nonetheless I felt like it would help to read it again when I was finished, once I had figured out who all the players were.

      Reply

    9. The first non-stop, single-handed, round-the-world yacht race, was "Like the first ascent of Everest, [] a feat without any larger purpose than its own end. But like a trip to the moon, it was a voyage that provided man with another benchmark of the far reach of his yearning endeavor". The race was nothing like today's well-funded, meticulously organized Vendee Globe or BOC Challenge. For a start, the rules were written as many of the competitor were already planning on undertaking the project. [...]

      Reply

    10. Cannot recommend this book enough. You really couldn't make this stuff up. Characters straight out of a Wes Anderson tale.More than a story about one of the most challenging events ever held, it's an incredible study of the characters, psychology and motivations of these 9, very different, personalities. A tour through both the marvel, incredible method and madness of the 9 participants all taking part in an inconcievable race for glory, fame and survival. The end results will baffle all.Peter's [...]

      Reply

    11. Finished and it was one heck of a ride I have loved to ocean and always wanted to sail but this book has confirmed for me how harsh and unforgiving it can be. Physically, mentally, emotionally. The open ocean can break men or strengthen them. I loved the book but upon finishing it I feel depressed after having read some of the outcomes.

      Reply

    12. Wow, this is a great read! Thrilling story, well-written and a real eye-opener regarding the personalities of individuals who take it upon themselves to embark on long journeys as lone yachtsmen. Happy to lose an eye if it means that you win a boat race? One of these competitors is. Madmen indeed! Oh, and it's a true story. For some of the competitors, the story is of how they met their deaths and for that reason, each of the dramas carries an extra poignancy. The author is a yachtsman himself a [...]

      Reply

    13. I read this on vacation in Maine. I picked it out of the rental owner's closet bookshelf. This is a compelling read of wildly different characters that were motivated by their own reasons to make the first and fastest solitary voyage across the world - sailing through the most difficult oceans. Compelling storytelling and an insightful look at the characters, cultural differences and motivation of very different men. The technological aspects of the voyage (or relative lack of modern technology) [...]

      Reply

    14. I enjoyed reading this book but being fairly familiar with the story of the famous Golden Globe race after reading the individual books from or about Crowhurst, Moitessier and Knox-Johnson I found some parts of the book not that interesting anymore as much the story telling came from parts of these earlier books. If you completely new to the topic, you will likely enjoy this book as it is well written and a fascinating story about truly extraordinary men. If you did read the other books already. [...]

      Reply

    15. Riveting. A window onto another world. A bunch of people with great contrasts of experience and character, doing something extraordinary in what is nearly, though not quite, the modern world. The author did a great job keeping a balance with the thrills and spills and the repeating monotony of life at sea on your own.

      Reply

    16. One of my hobbies is reading true life stories about real sailors on real life sailing adventures. I sail myself - we have a 34' sailboat that we basically move aboard in the summer - but I'm the first to admit that I'm a 'fair weather sailor.' So, this whole thing is vicarious. Even if you're not a sailor, I think you' enjoy Voyage for Madmen. Very readable. Very scary. Very well-written.

      Reply

    17. Beautifully written account of a historic round the world solo, non-stop, sailing race. This is an exhilarating story of adventure and the human spirit. I did not want this book to end.

      Reply

    18. 4.5 Stars!“I finally awoke at 1100 having had three hours uninterrupted sleep…We were rolling very heavily and it was difficult to stand inside the cabin, but I managed to heat up some soup…I felt very depressed on getting up…I used up a lot of nervous energy last night by leaving the jib up, for what-maybe an extra 20 miles if we’re lucky-and what difference does 20 miles make when I have about 20,000 to go? The future does not look particularly bright…sitting here being thrown abou [...]

      Reply

    19. I love a good sailing story as they contain plenty of adventurous people who are just a little bit mad. But in this book, wow, most of them are off the scale.This is the true story of the first round-the-world yacht race. It was sponsored by the Sunday Times and was called the Golden Globe race and was seen as the last frontier: to sail singlehandedly around the world non-stop and without any assistance.Nine men left England in 1968 and only one made it across the line (1969).The men involved ar [...]

      Reply

    20. The recent film ‘The Mercy’, about Donald Crowhurst and the act of deception in the 1968 Golden Globe race that drove him to madness, encouraged me to seek out this book. Though Nichols is obviously fascinated by Crowhurst’s story - the chapter on Crowhurst’s final hours is as emotionally shattering as anything I’ve read - he is assiduous in his account of the other eight competitors. Writing with a lifetime’s experience of sailing behind him, he conjures the hardships and the elemen [...]

      Reply

    21. 4.5 stars. What a tale. I didn't know much about this solo 1968-round-the-world boat race before I picked this book up -- but my husband's a sailor so he yammered about it. I figured I'd check it out and I'm glad I did before The Mercy movie (with Colin Firth as Donald Crowhurst) comes out this year. Crowhurst was one of the sailboat racers that the book talks about -- 9 started the race and only 1 finished after 10 months. I was hooked by the story and the incredible risks and hardships that al [...]

      Reply

    22. I was skeptical about this book when I picked it up off of the shelf at my parents house. My dad took a look at the hilarious captions in the picture section and his laughter piqued my interest. I opened it one night a few weeks later, still thinking that I wouldn't like it. Three hours later it was well past my bed time. The pace of this book is perfect. You couldn't make this stuff up. I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in adventuring, which should be everyone. The explanation o [...]

      Reply

    23. I usually agree with my men's book club about the books we read, but there are sometimes outliers, and this was one of them. I really enjoyed this book, but found myself in the minority on this. Almost no one else liked the book. I think I forgave the books its faults - its choppy starts, a cast of somewhat indistinct characters, especially in the opening third - because once they hit the water, I was swept away. I think this book captures the mad adventure that these people went on. I could tas [...]

      Reply

    24. I read this book on the recommendation that it was one of the best books they had ever read. I'm sure if I was into sailing, it may have been.It was a well written story about a race I had not heard of. Sailing around the world alone seems daunting and horrifically lonely which I think the author makes clear through all accounts. Would I recommend this book? Yes, but it would only be to a certain crowd and I would not be able to say it was quite possibly the best book I had ever read. I seem to [...]

      Reply

    25. I am in love. Easily a top-five-all-time book. I mean, I had to wipe away tears while on a train. IN PUBLIC. I laughed, I gasped, I swore, I was enthralled from page one. Nichols chose a thrilling subject, sure, but it takes a deft hand to pull together all the narratives and navigate through the broader story without losing any of the individual impact along the way. Also now utterly obsessed with Moitessier, who is absolutely, most purely THE MOST. Anyway, I've read some seriously cracking boo [...]

      Reply

    26. A brilliant account of an amazing collection of individuals, and what compelled them to try something that until then had never been done: a solo, non-stop circumnavigation of the globe. No GPS, months without radio contact, let alone sightings of land: just small boats and big minds pitted against the harshest ocean conditions. This book wonderfully complements one of my favourite ever documentaries, Deep Water, and I can't recommend it highly enough. The doc can be found here: youtu/IY2rQh8Ura [...]

      Reply

    27. I knew of the 1969 around-the-world yacht race when reading the chapter on Donald Crowhurst in the book "Great Exploration Hoaxes". This is a fascinating account of the men who decided to try their luck and the sheer logistical challenges of boating.What was most surprising that some of the entrants had virtually no sailing experience. It takes a special personality type to take that sort of risk. The sea is a very hostile environment and this reminds one of the old saying that 'fools go where a [...]

      Reply

    28. This is in the “Fact > Fiction” category. I picked this up after seeing it on a list about good maritime history books. It’s got some interesting sea lore, but underneath all that it’s a look at the psyche of men who are driven to extremes and the impacts of their choices. The author does a good job of dispassionately laying out the incredible stories, giving context and not giving too much away until the end. Good read.

      Reply

    29. This is the true story of 9 men who in 1968 set out individually to circumnavigate the globe in a sailboat without stopping in any ports or leaving their boat. Spoiler - only one man succeeded. I can't say I know much about sailing, but I found the stories of these 9 adventurous men and what they endured to be fascinating.

      Reply

    30. a consolidation multiple sources describing the journey for all the participants. I did learn some sailing techniques which are useful for long distance sailors. Especially worthwhile to have manual solutions versus total reliance on electronic guides. it did get a bit slow in the last few chapters.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *