Mothership: Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond

  • Title: Mothership: Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond
  • Author: Bill Campbell Edward Austin Hall Junot Díaz Lauren Beukes Victor LaValle Tobias S. Buckell N.K. Jemisin Joseph Bruchac
  • ISBN: 9780989141147
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Paperback
  • Mothership Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond Mothership Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond is a groundbreaking speculative fiction anthology that showcases the work from some of the most talented writers inside and outside speculative fiction ac
    Mothership Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond is a groundbreaking speculative fiction anthology that showcases the work from some of the most talented writers inside and outside speculative fiction across the globe including Junot Diaz, Victor LaValle, Lauren Beukes, N K Jemisin, Rabih Alameddine, S P Somtow, and These authors have earned such literary honors asMothership Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond is a groundbreaking speculative fiction anthology that showcases the work from some of the most talented writers inside and outside speculative fiction across the globe including Junot Diaz, Victor LaValle, Lauren Beukes, N K Jemisin, Rabih Alameddine, S P Somtow, and These authors have earned such literary honors as the Pulitzer Prize, the American Book Award, the World Fantasy Award, and the Bram Stoker, among others.

    • ☆ Mothership: Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ Bill Campbell Edward Austin Hall Junot Díaz Lauren Beukes Victor LaValle Tobias S. Buckell N.K. Jemisin Joseph Bruchac
      437 Bill Campbell Edward Austin Hall Junot Díaz Lauren Beukes Victor LaValle Tobias S. Buckell N.K. Jemisin Joseph Bruchac
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Mothership: Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ Bill Campbell Edward Austin Hall Junot Díaz Lauren Beukes Victor LaValle Tobias S. Buckell N.K. Jemisin Joseph Bruchac
      Posted by:Bill Campbell Edward Austin Hall Junot Díaz Lauren Beukes Victor LaValle Tobias S. Buckell N.K. Jemisin Joseph Bruchac
      Published :2019-01-25T13:17:11+00:00

    About Bill Campbell Edward Austin Hall Junot Díaz Lauren Beukes Victor LaValle Tobias S. Buckell N.K. Jemisin Joseph Bruchac


    1. Bill Campbell is a native of Pittsburgh and an alumnus of Northwestern University Throughout his varied and illustrious career, he has done everything from assembling Christmas toys in Cleveland loading trucks, bookkeeping, and being an AmeriCorps volunteer in Atlanta coordinating an elementary school literacy program in D.C to teaching English as a second language in the Czech Republic He s also the former publisher of the independent magazine, Contraband, and the music trade magazine, CD Revolutions Bill came out with Sunshine Patriots, a semi satirical, military sf novel, back in 2004 My Booty Novel, which he likes to call fluff for nerds, came out in 2007 His new book, Pop Culture Politics, Puns, and Poohbutt from a Liberal Stay at Home Dad was released in September, 2010.Bill lives in Washington, DC, where he has worked as a music critic for ink19 and currently works for a company that produces books for the blind for the Library of Congress.


    805 Comments


    1. In the introduction to Mothership, editors Bill Campbell and Edward Austin Hall describe their love of science fiction and the process of coming to terms with the absence of people of color in meaningful roles. One need look no further than the monolithic Whiteness of the Star Wars universe with its sinister Orientalist Trade Federation, Gungan minstrel show and lack of voice or official recognition for the Wookie sidekick at the end of Episode IV to see it. The state of SF today is not substant [...]

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    2. When I finished reading the first story in Mothership, a little voice in my head said "Was that really the story to start this anthology with? I mean, sure it's got a black protagonist, but is that enough?"And then the rest of me took a step back, looked horrified, and said: "Have you learned nothing from Pam Noles' essay "Shame"? And from the entire Kaleidoscope project? The story has a black protagonist. That's entirely the point."And then I sat, aghast at my own white ignorance, and felt asha [...]

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    3. This is a very un-Shira book--often violent and dystopian--but it's high quality for people who are okay with much harsher SFF. However, there were a handful of stories that I did enjoy, such as:"The Aphotic Ghost" by Carlos Hernandez, in which the MC comes to understand the supernatural and magical elements of the one-night-stand that gave him a son several decades ago. A beautiful and hauntingly soothing story about family and being two things at once, with settings as varied as the ocean and [...]

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    4. This is a crowd-funded collection of short stories focused on adding a little color to speculative fiction. Don't expect this to be just a bunch of sci-fi, only with black folks. Actually, don't expect a whole lot of sci-fi at all. There's some, but it's a broader, more varied look at speculative fiction.There's a bunch of quality work here with a great amount of diversity, diversity of all kinds. I can't think of a real clinker in the bunch.The only point of disappointment was that I didn't rea [...]

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    5. This was a very hit or miss collection for me. It has a refreshingly wide range of styles, moods, and settings. There are some striking stories here, and very interesting characters and rich worlds to explore. That said, I think some stories would be better suited to novellas or novels than one-shots, as sometimes the complexity and depth of detail can make some of the stories less accessible than others. Still, it's well worth a read, and I hope to see more such projects in the future!

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    6. If I'm allowed to use the food metaphor for literature, where pulp is fastfood and some literature is high cuisine, this collection is like dining out in an exotic restaurant (ethiopian?), where the table is filled with many dishes, to sample. The joy is in the exotic tastes, the spices, the lingering sensation in the back of your mouth, the knowledge of having a new experience, that leaves you enriched. But also sometimes it can be a bit too spicy for the untrained palate, good in the moment bu [...]

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    7. Mothership is not what I was expecting. To be fair, I wasn't entirely clear going into it what sort of stories these would be, though I was assuming mostly sci fi. There is certainly sci fi in here, but there's a lot more as well. I was curious to know more about what "Afrofuturism" is as a genre, and I'm afraid that I left the book without much insight there. As L.E.H. Light wrote in her review, 'Maybe “Speculative Fiction by and about People of Color” or something similar would have better [...]

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    8. The diversity in this collection is amazing, with stories set in cultures all over the world (and off-world). They take place in the past, present and future. The authors' styles vary from cultural vignettes to tightly plotted stories to novel excerpts. There were a lot of reprints, but only one I'd read before. Some of my favorites included:Thaddeus Howze's "Bludgeon", a funny story about an alien invasion and baseball.Charles R. Saunders's "Amma", an African myth about a gazelle-woman.Tobias B [...]

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    9. There were more hits than misses, more examples of stories engaging than not, and overall? Probably a GREAT introduction and refutation to the notion that people of color can't write science fiction/fantasy. REALLY enjoyed this volume.

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    10. Absolutely stellar story collection. I recommend this to anyone who likes spec fic; you will not be disappointed. Many of these are the type of story I will be lying awake thinking about ten years from now.

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    12. The best thing about this anthology is that it is filled with a variety of fiction across speculative genres from authors with both complimentary and completely different styles. While I did not like every single story in here, I appreciated all of them as well written and reflective of their author's passion. Mothership is a go to if you want to bathe in black speculative excellence, but it is also simply about the human experience across ethnicities, times, and places. It features works from a [...]

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    13. The stories in Mothership are incredibly diverse. Firstly, each story centers on non-white protagonists/cultures/societies, and the collection includes writing by authors from all over the world, including the Caribbean, Africa, South Asia, and Native Americans. Secondly, the scope of these stories includes speculative fiction, mystical/magical realism, alternative history, supernatural/fantasy, horror, and futuristic folklore.As a reader, this collection was refreshing. It was very reassuring t [...]

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    14. This long anthology has a bit of something for every one and a bit of everyone in the pages. While some stories weren't quite my taste I appreciated being able to read them and understand the creativity, personality, and uniqueness of many of these stories. As a person of color this book gave many different types of people who looked like me and those who did not but all were far flung from any stereotypes. From ancient Egyptian myths to far flung space colonies still tied to ancient african and [...]

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    15. An excellent collection of stories. The breadth is impressive with diversity among the authors, styles, subjects. I didn't love every single story, but there were several that were amazing and it was great to be introduced to new authors whose work I will definitely be following.

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    16. Amazing collection! A wide variety of tales with many gems that go right to the heart of a sense of identity, connection to place and land, and culture of those whose place and identity is torn or traumatized. A good intro to afrofuturism, with post-colonial works well represented, and science fiction (with some fantasy) that comes from a core more interesting and less explored than is often the case. Very thankful to Campbell and Hall for creating this, and to the contributors for their incredi [...]

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    17. This was great. I really enjoyed:I Left My Heart in Skaftafell, Victor LavalleAmma, Charles R. SaundersThe Runner of n-Vamana, Indrapramit DasIn the Belly of the Crocodile, Minister FaustThe Buzzing, Katherena VermetteMonstro, Junot DiazThe Buzzing, in particular, for as short as it is, Vermette packs a punch with it; I read it at like 0200 and it gave me goosebumps. Lavalle, Saunders, Das and Faust took folktales and/or mythology and really went places; they felt fresh. Amma I liked in particul [...]

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    18. I didn't expect to connect with every story but the ones I did connect with were very enjoyable. There is a lot of variety and tales from Africa, Asia, the Americas and the Caribbean. It was refreshing and heart warming to read Lisa Allen-Agostini's work that intermingled sci-fi and traditional J'ouvert. My favourite was Monstro by Junot Díaz - which unfortunately will not become a full novel and I'm slightly distraught because I did NOT want that story to end.

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    19. Con tanta variedad de estilos e historias que se desarrollan desde Haití hasta Japón y algunos lugares mas, se rescata gran parte del libro, sin embargo no todo el contenido es bueno, algunas historias son tan cortas que parecieron inconclusas. aunque al final la mayoría valió la pena

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    20. REALLY excellent, and highly readable collection of amazing sci-fi. HIGHLY recommended.

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    21. Pretty great collection of short stories that give you a good start on AfroFuturism (if you're not familiar with the subgenre).

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    22. There is some unevenness as anthologies will always have but I feel as if there is less than normal.

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    23. So, what to say? I guess I never realized how white science fiction is. I realized early about the man thing and have varied my reading. Some of the sci fi I do read has been from other places, for sure. Speculative fiction writing from non North American writers has always been a plus. It is not to say that I don't read them but that it is more interesting to layer the other on top of the other of Speculative Fiction. This collection focuses on Afrofuturism which include the diaspora of the Car [...]

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    24. So Mothership is a really excellent collection with a huge number of great stories and a few that weren't as great but were still interesting or entertaining, overall I'm super pleased. It's difficult to describe and review though, because the stories span a really broad variety of sub-genres within the spec-fic umbrella (for those coming new to the party, Mothership is a collection of spec-fic short stories focusing on characters of colour) and analysing the ways those stories and characters in [...]

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    25. ebook @ BG, chkd out 2/11/17. 999 copies!

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    26. A great, though uneven, collection of afrofuturist fiction featuring stories and authors from across the African Diaspora and people of color. Favorites include N. K. Jemisin's "Too Many Yesterdays, Not Enough Tomorrows," Joseph Bruchac's "Dances with Ghosts," Lisa Allen-Agostini's "A Fine Specimen," and Nisi Shawl's "Good Boy." Get it if you love stories. Definitely get it if you are looking to find great work from authors of color doing incredibly interesting things with Science Fiction and Fa [...]

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    27. Favorite stories/authors to read:LaValle, Victor. I left my heart in Skaftafell. &Buckell, Tobias. Four eyes. Both urban fantasy done the way I like.Alameddine, Rabih. Almost alternate history/historical fiction. Bruchac, Joseph. Dances with ghosts. Funny.Older, Daniel José. Protected entity. Creepy and New York-ish.Walker, George S. Fées des dents. Imaginative and also effing horrifying.

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    28. Worth it I feel like most of the best stories got put into the sampler I read before purchasing this. In addition, there was this weird formatting error where the word "acute;" was inserted randomly into the middle of certain words.That said, many of these stories should have been novels, rather than shorts.

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    29. A mixed bag, as anthologies often are, and hard to give a star rating to as a result. Some I really liked, several stretched my understanding; one I didn't finish. Definitely worth picking up if you like speculative fiction.

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    30. A really solid anthology with a great variety of stories featuring a wide range of different cultures, themes and characters. No dud stories. There were a few authors I'd experienced before (all of whom I liked) as well as a decent amount of unfamiliar ones. Definitely worth reading!

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