The Swords Trilogy

  • Title: The Swords Trilogy
  • Author: Michael Moorcock
  • ISBN: 9780425088487
  • Page: 127
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Swords Trilogy Includes the novels The Knight of the Swords The Queen of the Swords and The King of the Swords The gods themselves feel fear It is the conjunction of the Million Spheres and all things are possibl
    Includes the novels The Knight of the Swords, The Queen of the Swords, and The King of the Swords.The gods themselves feel fear It is the conjunction of the Million Spheres, and all things are possible Beneath the bloody banners of the Dog and the Bear, the cruel Mabden are sweeping the Earth The mystic Vadhagh are wiped out all but one Armed with the Hand of Kwll andIncludes the novels The Knight of the Swords, The Queen of the Swords, and The King of the Swords.The gods themselves feel fear It is the conjunction of the Million Spheres, and all things are possible Beneath the bloody banners of the Dog and the Bear, the cruel Mabden are sweeping the Earth The mystic Vadhagh are wiped out all but one Armed with the Hand of Kwll and his own thirsty sword, Prince Corum Jhaelen pursues his fate and his vengeance through all the fifteen planes of Earth, even to the very center of Time the still, blue city of Tanelorn.In this powerful fantasy Michael Moorcock has created then just another tale of sword and sorcery The Chronicles of Corum masterful blend of magic, heroism and wonder that will delight the millions that love Conan and Lord of the Rings from back cover

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      Published :2020-01-02T10:53:20+00:00

    About Michael Moorcock


    1. Michael John Moorcock is an English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels Moorcock has mentioned The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Apple Cart by George Bernard Shaw and The Constable of St Nicholas by Edward Lester Arnold as the first three books which captured his imagination He became editor of Tarzan Adventures in 1956, at the age of sixteen, and later moved on to edit Sexton Blake Library As editor of the controversial British science fiction magazine New Worlds, from May 1964 until March 1971 and then again from 1976 to 1996, Moorcock fostered the development of the science fiction New Wave in the UK and indirectly in the United States His serialization of Norman Spinrad s Bug Jack Barron was notorious for causing British MPs to condemn in Parliament the Arts Council s funding of the magazine.During this time, he occasionally wrote under the pseudonym of James Colvin, a house pseudonym used by other critics on New Worlds A spoof obituary of Colvin appeared in New Worlds 197 January 1970 , written by William Barclay another Moorcock pseudonym Moorcock, indeed, makes much use of the initials JC , and not entirely coincidentally these are also the initials of Jesus Christ, the subject of his 1967 Nebula award winning novella Behold the Man, which tells the story of Karl Glogauer, a time traveller who takes on the role of Christ They are also the initials of various Eternal Champion Moorcock characters such as Jerry Cornelius, Jerry Cornell and Jherek Carnelian In recent years, Moorcock has taken to using Warwick Colvin, Jr as yet another pseudonym, particularly in his Second Ether fiction.


    639 Comments


    1. Moorcock has a reputation among fantasy editors for the speed with which he can turn out a story--call him and tell him you have a slot in an upcoming anthology that need filling, and he'll send you something the next day. It reminds me of an old truism in writing: if you never seem to be able to finish anything, then you're too critical of yourself, but if you are finishing things constantly, then you probably aren't critical enough.That isn't to suggest that Moorcock has a swell head--from eve [...]

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    2. 4.5 stars. This is an omnibus edition of the first three books in the Corum series including The Knight of the Swords, The Queen of the Swords and The King of the Swords. This series is part of the larger Eternal Champion cycle. These stories are excellent and just barely short of 5 stars for me as a group. Great multi-verse world-building that reminds me of a cross between the Kane stories by Karl Wagner and the Amber series by Roger Zelazny. This is extremely well-done, action-orientated, swor [...]

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    3. Another of my favorite books (or set of books I should say). So much "the whole idea" of Corum that I can honestly say I have never finished the book that contains the last three stories in the Corum series (Oak and the Ram, Bull and the Spear, one other, something like that).Written again in typical Moorcock style with a really encompassing welcoming quality that puts you into the world. Wide variety between experiences on each of the three sets of five planes run by the Sword Rulers. I'd have [...]

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    4. Originally these books were only available as three individual volumes and for many years I had the first one of this series and the last one of the second series and had to work out with some imagination what had happened in between. This was because in the olden days we had no with detailed entries on fantasy book series'.In the way of fantasy books, the hero having lost a hand and an eye through carelessness while being tortured, magically acquires new ones as part of a deal, as one knows th [...]

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    5. Good stuff. However, if I had it to do over again, I would space out the reading of each short novel. Moorcock wrote these things quickly, and after the first novel, it shows(which is exactly how the Elric novels unfolded for me). Characters flatten out, action scenes are by the numbers, etc. On the good side is Moorcock's amazing imagination: a flying cat, a flying shark, a magical kite that can carry people, zombie slaves used (a bit too often) by the hero (Corum) whenever things get tight, mu [...]

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    6. Bastante inferior a Elric, a pesar de que en el final el autor lo meta como personaje para intentar remontar esta aventura brusca, rápida y caóticaEs la clásica aventura de capa y brujería, sin complicaciones ni profundizar en los personajes. Esto lo cumple, pero lo que debería hacer bien, que es la aventura, peleas y malvados. No lo hace. Aun deseando una historia rápida, esta me ha parecido excesiva, todo pasaba como si faltaran frases. Una locura…

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    7. A good book to be sick while reading. Corum, a Vadhagh prince, is put on the path of vengeance, but is given a lesson in the BIG picture. And by big picture I'm talk 15 planes of existence, the Lords of Order & Chaos, and a cycle of history which is indifferent to the suffering of individuals (the Lords got tired of his race or like a film studio there was a change at the top and Corum's race was dropped (sorry! nothing personal!))The Knight of Swords is very archetypal, with a basic hero cy [...]

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    8. Halfway between Hyperborea and the Haight - Michael Moorcock's CorumMichael Moorcock's early swords and sorcery novels - like the Swords Of Corum trilogy - were written quickly and with a market in mind. But they were also the output of a polymath - a writer, editor, musician and critic - with a restless and prolific muse.It's no surprise then that the Corum stories are a strange and uneven mix of fantasy formula and genre transgression. Or that the reader's own engagement and interest will vary [...]

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    9. The trouble with dipping into Moorcock's vast interlinked oeuvre is not knowing where the hell to begin. I did try to read one of the Jerry Cornelius short story collections many years ago, but going into that straight from Eddings & Feist wasn't such a good idea - Moorcock bounced straight off me.Now, I like my epic fantasies, and from what I could gather this particular volume, the first of two Corum collections, seemed to be a good place to try again. And it works both as an introduction [...]

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    10. A classic Moorcock fantasy composed of three parts. The first part (The Knight of the Swords) is definitely the best one has it includes a wonderful demonstration of Moorcock's imagination combined with a poetic topography. It literally reads as a classic fairy tale even though gruesome at times. The other two parts (The Queen of the Swords and The King of the Swords) are definitely imaginative, but lack the poetic flavor of the first part. The story is a tug of war between Law and Chaos which t [...]

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    11. This trilogy has all the elements of a classic fantasy gem. It seems a little dated sometimes (it was written in the early 70s I believe) but retains its mastery of images and storytelling. I hadn't been into fantasy books long before Moorcock was recommended to me, and I picked up a rather old edition of this in battered paperback. I didn't expect to like it as much as I did but in the end I had a hard time putting it down. It's very imaginative, even for a fantasy, and everyone loves a good ol [...]

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    12. This was one of my favorite books from my early teen years. It is probably not a technically perfect book, and I really can't remember all the details of the story, but I love Moorcock's storytelling, and Corum is perhaps my favorite character of his, even more so than Elric. I love how these stories languish in the settings they portray. This series has probably been the strongest foundation for my tastes in fantasy fiction of any other book besides the Shannara books.

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    13. I expected a level of pulp with these and, with the pulp, a certain amount of sameness in the plots. I got that, certainly, but what I didn't expect was the subtleties in the plot of each story that raised each above mere pulp. These are good and well worth your time to read.

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    14. A good tale of another eternal champion although not as engaging as other characters Moorcock has created.

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    15. nwhytevejournal/2921219mlThis trilogy, first published in 1971, is the first of two trilogies featuring Corum Jhaelen Irsei, one of the incarnations of Moorcock's Eternal Champion; the first and third volumes won the first two August Derleth Awards. I'm not super familiar with Moorcock's heroic fantasies; I did find it striking that he successfully takes the traditional storyline of chivalry, questing and manly derring-do, and underpins it with lashings of melancholy, destiny, and cosmic balance [...]

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    16. This was my first foray into Fantasy when I was a young man some Forty years ago the names where difficult to pronounce but the story was captervating and intrigining and I remember hang in there and I am so glad I did it is one of favorite stories

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    17. "My name is Inigo Montoya Corum Jhaelen Irsei. You've killed my father (And Mother. And all my close relatives. And the distant ones. In fact, you've wiped out my entire species). Prepare to die!""Corum" as a volume contains the first trilogy about Corum, yet another incarnation of the Eternal Champion. Like Hawkmoon, Corum fights Chaos. Unlike Hawkmoon, Corum isn't perfect. In fact, Corum is a deeply flawed and damaged individual. His race the Vadhagh (one thing about this series--if you're the [...]

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    18. The Swords TrilogyBy Michael MoorcockPublisher: Ace FantasyPublished In: New York, New York, USADate: 1971Pgs: 403Summary:The gods are afraid. The Conjunction of the Million Spheres is about to sweep the multiverse and all things are possible. Men sweep the Earth driving the Vadhagh and Nhadragh toward extinction. A handicapped Elvish man gifted with the eye and hand of two brother gods must seek balance between Law and Chaos. He must fight the good fight. He must seek the eternal city of Tanelo [...]

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    19. Michael Moorcock, The Swords Trilogy (Berkley, 1971)Michael Moorcock here introduces us to another aspect of the Eternal Champion, Corum of the Scarlet Robe. Corum fits the Eternal Champion mold well in the first three books of this six-book series-he's a chap who's rather like the rest of his race, normal from that perspective, but whose race is somewhat divorced from (older than, as are Elric's race) the humans who share a planet with them. While devoid of supernatural powers himself, he gains [...]

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    20. Moorcock fortsätter att imponera med sin fantasi och bitvis fantastiskt bildspråk. Sett till storyn är det egentligen inget speciellt och saknar den dragkraft som fanns hos Elric. Vi får en i grunden ganska enkel hämndhistoria som mest går ut på att Corum plus sällskap ska hitta en sak per bok eller del. Det blir snabbt enformigt och att läsa alla tre böckerna i ett svep är inte att rekommendera om än att de som helhet ändå är läsvärda. Detta är mest för att Moorcock med ett i [...]

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    21. In an intriguing addition to the sword-and-sorcery genre, Michael Moorcock offers us The Swords Trilogy, otherwise known as The Chronicles of Corum. In a mystical land, in a time now lost to history, myriad of creatures and sentient beings traveled between the realms that comprised their universe, ripping open the fabric of space and time itself, thus bending it to their will. It was a time of gods and magic, sorcery and shadow. It was a time where armies of light and soldiers of darkness met on [...]

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    22. I first read this when I was going into third grade, convincing my grandmother to buy it because I thought the cover looked cool and I wanted to read an "adult" fantasy novel for myself (after my parents read me the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings)… I spent an entire summer devouring it from front to cover. This is the book (or collection of books, which I didn't realize at the time) that made me interested in fantasy, particularly in the kind of fantasy that was more "edgy" than the Tolkien [...]

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    23. As always, when reviewing Moorcock's work, it's difficult to know where to start. The vivid imagination? The re-telling of local mythologies (in this instance Cornish legends) from a familiar to an unfamiliar form? Should the reviewer concentrate on the philosophical underpinnings within the work, or re-examine everything they assumed about the fantasy genre. As always, the truth is found somewhere in-between. It has often been said about Moorcock's work, that it inspires the reader to pen their [...]

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    24. My Moorcock marathon continues, and now we come to the first of his novels I ever read. Since that occasion, I've re-visited Corum at least twice, which would make this the fourth time. I have little doubt that there will be a fifth. I simply adore this trilogy. Here, Moorcock shows us why he's considered a supreme fantasist. His imagination knows no bounds. He is audacious, stylish and utterly captivating. The otherworldly atmosphere he creates is unlike any I have encountered elsewhere, with a [...]

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    25. They just don't write like this anymore. It's a shame, because there was a lot of imaginative stuff crammed into these short novels - any one of which could have been expanded upon to make a longer novel. Corum and Rhalina could have used a little more oomph, as they were little more than archetypes most of the time, but I wouldn't change Jhary-a-Conel for anything. He quickly became my favorite character because he provided a much-needed upbeat counterpart for Corum's gloominess and the overall [...]

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    26. This was one of my gym reads. The hero finds his people have been slaughtered by barbarians, he is soon captured and tortured. He finds himself in the service of the God of Law. With the aid of God of Law's magical items he undertakes a mission that starts with revenge. He finds love, sacrifice, and high fantasy adventure.The book had a very unexpected ending. I won't reveal it here, but I wasn't sure if I liked this ending or not. The more I thought about it, the ending is satisfying and not at [...]

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    27. The first half of the set of stories concerned with Prince Corum Jhaelen Irsei is not my favorite of the Eternal Champion series, but it's engaging enough rainy day fare. Corum is just plain not as interesting as some of the other champions and in fact the bright point in this series is the presence of the character Jhary-a-Conel who is (as is often true with the companions) a far more engaging character then the champion himself. That being said starting with a character lacking the usual Etern [...]

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    28. Unique and exciting. A true fantasy classic. The first trilogy quickly became one of my all time favorite fantasy novel. I barely closed the book. I was always excited about the next chapters, the next pages. I read it on bus, in bed, in armchair, before sleep, after lunch, every time I had the chance to move forward in the story.I guess I still cannot find another novel in this scene which is so unique and atmospheric. The imaginary of the parallel worlds, the colorful but so different planes o [...]

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    29. Obviously a by-the-numbers effort, but I love the concepts of chaos and order and all that. Some of the images are nothing short of brilliant even if it doesn't always move along at a brisk enough clip. I've now read this trilogy three time.s Very influential on my early life.By the way, avoid the second Corum trilogy -- it's horrible. It is entirely by-the-numbers, with none of the bigger concepts coming through.

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    30. Clearly not the best of Moorcock's otherwise quite good body of work. The characters come across as flat, the world as unvivid, and the central plot as tired. However, it's an enjoyable enough book for those who'd like to lose their selves in fantasy but would prefer not to think about it. Certainly doesn't have the depth of the Elric novels and lacks the intelligence of Moorcock's literary works.

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