We Used to Be Kings

  • Title: We Used to Be Kings
  • Author: Stewart Foster
  • ISBN: 9780224098038
  • Page: 434
  • Format: Hardcover
  • We Used to Be Kings Six years ago Tom s brother died The next day he came back It s Tom and Jack s th birthday but it isn t a cause for celebration For the past three years they ve been in a care home for troubled chi
    Six years ago Tom s brother died The next day he came back.It s Tom and Jack s 18th birthday, but it isn t a cause for celebration For the past three years they ve been in a care home for troubled children, a place where Dr Smith tries to silence the voice of Jack in Tom s head But Tom doesn t want that He s already lost his brother once, he s not going to lose him agaSix years ago Tom s brother died The next day he came back.It s Tom and Jack s 18th birthday, but it isn t a cause for celebration For the past three years they ve been in a care home for troubled children, a place where Dr Smith tries to silence the voice of Jack in Tom s head But Tom doesn t want that He s already lost his brother once, he s not going to lose him again.And so, when they go in front of the review board, they will have to pretend Jack has gone so they won t be sent to the Young Men s Institution or they ll have to escape Because one way or another they ve got to get out of this place They ve got to be free, they ve got to remember everything that happened to them, to their mum, and to their dad.They have to find their dad, whom they haven t seen since he left on a space mission to the moon when they were young.We Used To Be Kings is the story of a young boy s descent into madness following the loss of everything he knows Set in the 1970s, it is reminiscent of unusually hot summers, pictures of Russians in space and war on our doorstep It s an audacious, at times hilarious story that is ultimately heartbreaking and unforgettable.

    • ↠ We Used to Be Kings || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Stewart Foster
      434 Stewart Foster
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ We Used to Be Kings || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Stewart Foster
      Posted by:Stewart Foster
      Published :2019-05-18T14:00:12+00:00

    About Stewart Foster


    1. Stewart Foster lives in Bath and wishes he d never left school So he went back to university far too many years later and he wrote a book, We used to be Kings, and then he wrote another, The Bubble Boy, that won Sainsbury s book of the year 2016 10 and The Trinity Schools Book Award 2017 His next book All the things that could go wrong will be published 28 06 2017Like his page on Facebook Stewart Foster Author and follow him on twitter stewfoster1.


    213 Comments


    1. I bought this book a few months ago, and I've finally gotten round to reading it!"We used to be kings" is a book entirely based around mental illness. I suppose really, this is what initially attracted me to the book, in the first place. Mental illness, unfortunately, even now, is something that is still swept under the carpet, therefore meaning that many who have a mental illness, are suffering in silence.This book brought me a whole load of emotions. It was funny, happy, at times rather scary [...]

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    2. There seems to be a surge of fiction that challenges the stigmas associated with mental illness and learning disabilities at the moment. Only recently, The Shock Of The Fall has won the Costa Book Prize for its story of a man suffering with split personalities. Maggot Moon won the Carnegie Prize for it's portrayal of Standish Treadwell, a boy suffering with dyslexia who is entirely misunderstood. And here, in We Used To Be Kings, I hope we have another award winner; for it's tale of brotherly lo [...]

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    3. It is rare that an author trusts his reader in the way Stewart Foster does in We Used To Be Kings. A conventional writer would lead you through the narrative, but here you are allowed into the main character’s head and without having his tangled thoughts explained you can come to your own conclusions about him. The trouble in Tom’s mind is the constant voice of his dead younger brother, Jack, who is beguilingly innocent and knowing, and it is through their conversations that we learn about t [...]

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    4. Loved this beautiful, harrowing and very original story about a boy's descent into psychosis as a way of dealing with his brother's death. Tom/Jack's voice is amazing and very real. A heartbreaking yet stunning tale.

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    5. This book, oh my god.I literally don't know what to say, I've felt so many emotions over the past day (I powered this book in a day, don't judge me) that I'm speechless.First of all, I love that the author has leaned towards particular diagnoses and allows the reader to make up their own mind. Does Tom have schizophrenia? Is he just reacting to his grief? Does his Dad have PTSD or is he really on the moon? This story gives fantastic insight into what someone might experience with psychosis, and [...]

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    6. This book. What to say. I've read a lot of books recently that deal with psychosis-be it in children or adults (thank you thesis!), obviously these are medical/academic books, but this fiction work dips it's toe majestically into these waters. I have to say, this deals with a very sensitive subject (multiple sensitive subjects, actually) in such a thoughtful, considered manner, it was beautiful to read. Too often some subjects can be dramatised or exaggerated for effect, and a lot fall into thes [...]

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    7. A really good read, I couldn't put it down and blasted through it in a couple of days. The narration is very original and very brave: Foster shows the thoughts and feelings of two characters sharing one body. I've never seen anything like it before, it is the best attempt to get into the experience of grief and madness that I've read, and it makes for a very poignant, often darkly comic read. I look forward to seeing what the author does next!

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    8. I never write reviews but I really enjoyed this book! I haven't read too many books written in this style so it was a nice change. I do have a question (I couldn't find the Ask the Author to ask directly so I'm hoping he sees this) What happened with the father? From what I could tell, there was a period of time where he just disappeared. What was he doing? Does anyone have any theories?

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    9. What a fantastic novel by this debut author. It's an intelligent, thought-provoking and gripping tale of grief and mental illness. How nice to read a genuine unique voice for once and not to be spoon-fed as a reader. Not to be missed.

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    10. Hmm it wasn't bad. Interesting. At times a bit intriguing but I think the idea could have been better handled.

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    11. I don't think I've ever read a book that manages to portray such a strong case of mental illness in such a beautiful yet painful way. The author did an amazing job, the book is truly one of a kind for me.Tom's struggle with his illness (I would say Tom suffers from split personality but being no expert in mental disorders I will just say I'm not sure what Tom's diagnosis is) was illuminating in explaining how his mind worked and how he and Jack functioned together and apart at the same time.The [...]

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    12. I'm so thankful for stumbling upon this book in the library (and for the kind secret note someone had left between its pages). It took the whole book for it to settle on me that Tom had been alone the whole time (not including the brief encounter with Harriet) for he had all the company he needed inside himself. I saw part of myself in Tom and that was both reassuring and a little daunting.I couldn't put this book down and read it in 2 days, completely enthralled by the story and its characters. [...]

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    13. No. I do applaud the author for taking a new perspective into dealing with psychosis and the loss of a sibling, but I could not get with the narrative structure. The constant dialogue between Tom and Jack got tiresome and was generally just unrealistic and annoying. Kudos to Stewart Foster for not feeding his readers with a spoon, though. He trusts the reader and it shows in this book as he does not make things explicit and leaves room for interpretation. But other than that, I could not get int [...]

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    14. Touching, a bit more so than I expected. The central tool here is The book as a whole reads more like a book for teens instead of adults.

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    15. I loved this book, it's a very though book to read because it deals with a lot of heavy subjects like psychological illness and delusions. There's a lot of love in this story, Tom loves his brother so much and even though he has got no chance to a normal life with Jake in his head, he just can't give him up. All along the story I was surprised of how much I actually liked the writing style, you constantly read the conversation in Toms head. It can be a bit confusing at first but a few pages in a [...]

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    16. Coincidentally, I picked up Foster’s debut novel only moments after rereading Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. The famously autistic Christopher Boone surely inspired waves of uniquely troubled protagonists, and Foster’s eighteen-year-old Tom, who carries in his head the voice and personality of his dead brother Jack, feels like one of those myriad offshoots. That said, Tom’s interactions with ten-year-old Jack are loving, protective and emotionally comple [...]

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    17. It's hard to find the words to describe this book. It is at times scary, funny and sad, but mostly terribly, terribly sad. It's about a boy, Tom, whose dead brother talks to him inside his head and whose father has gone to the moon.It's a clever book and shows the reality of Tom's psychosis so painfully clearly that at one point I wondered how Tom would cope if his brother's voice were to disappear. The whole story of exactly what happened to each person is slowly revealed to show how Tom comes [...]

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    18. Très ambitieux dans sa forme, ce roman peine un peu à décoller. On suit l'histoire de Jack et Tom, deux frères partis à la recherche de leur père. Mais dans leur fuite, de nombreux problèmes les attendent à commencer par le fait que l'un des deux est en fait mort (pas de spoiler, on le découvre au bout de quelques pages). Au fil des flashbacks, on découvre leur histoire, ce qui s'est passé et le drame qui les a jeté sur la route. Cette histoire un peu folle est pleine de tendresse et [...]

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    19. A really wonderful book!!! Loved how I read it right after My Sister Lives On The Mantelpiece. Rather, listened to it. I love when I pick real winners from Audible, and they are simply fantastic! Oh, my comment during the progress still stands. Found Jack to be too irritating. But I suppose Tom needed him to keep alive, as much as Jack from keeping him from living.On the down note though, seriously what is with the disparaging - & worst of all, completely unnecessary - reference to Africa by [...]

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    20. From the first page I was gripped and fascinated by the characters of this book. The two brother's made me laugh throughout the book and I believed in them from start to finish. Unfortunately I found the ending a bit of a let down and an anti-climax. I thought the story lost its way a little when they met the girl with the van, and I didn't find the conclusion as emotionally satisfying as the build up had demanded. Still, despite this, I really enjoyed the story and enjoyed every moment spent wi [...]

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    21. Too many loose ends. What happened to his dad? He was clearly psychotic himself and I was waiting for the big revelation the main character - did he really know it all along?Lots of other little annoyances. A woman wouldn't, for instance, think somebody was trying to rob her just because they were talking to themselves - especially when they repeatedly told her they weren't. Disappointing. Unrealistic and disappointing.

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    22. Bolinda audiobook. I think it might be a strength of the book, that it was so tiring to deal with Jack butting in all the time, and being so childish when Tom was an adult. By the end, I felt just as tired of having to perpetually deal with the interruptions and presence of this child as I'm sure Tom was, yet you could also tell how much Tom loved Jack despite how much harder he made every task and thought and interaction with the world.

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    23. A heart wrenching and at the same time heart warming book about the relationship between two brothers. Jack is dead and Tom continues to have conversations with him. Although the book is about mental illness and the darker side of life it is not sad and I was hooked early on and hoping that Tom would find all the answers to what happened to his father. A wonderful debut to be proud of.

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    24. What an unusual and strange book !!! I really loved the narration and how the craziness of the character was showed. I felt close to him : not in a way 'i'm crazy too !' ahah, but in a way 'he is crazy but very sensitive and lost' : you want to understand him, to help him find a way to get better. You cared.I would recommend this book to people looking for something veryyyy different :)

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    25. This book was based on a really clever idea, and I feel you really got to know the main character(s) quickly. I enjoyed reading it, although there were parts I didn't like, particularly the ending. In a sharp contrast to the previous book I'd finished this was a little too stark! Quite torn on my feelings towards it.

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    26. An excellent read. You know from early on how some of the story ends, but you want to read it to the end to find out the how and why. Much like Nathan Filer's 'The Shock of the Fall', this is a very well-written book about mental illness.Highly recommended read!

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    27. How do you put a book like this into words to describe it? It's both sad and funny, awkward yet heartbreaking. The balance between the characters was just right, and the ending was about the only way to truly end it.

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    28. Probably the shittiest book I've ever read. I hope I don't ever have to see this crap ever again. 0.2/10

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    29. Really enjoyed this book, it was original, quirky and beautifully written. Highly recommend.

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