Hot Water

  • Title: Hot Water
  • Author: P.G. Wodehouse
  • ISBN: 9781585673896
  • Page: 188
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Hot Water At French seaside Ch teau Blissac J Wellington Gedge from California wants to go home His larger richer wife wants him to be a Paris Ambassador blackmails Senator Opal publicly dry with a letter t
    At French seaside Ch teau Blissac, J Wellington Gedge from California wants to go home His larger richer wife wants him to be a Paris Ambassador, blackmails Senator Opal, publicly dry, with a letter to his bootlegger in her safe Jewels attract criminals tough Soup Slattery and Oily Carlisle, who mourn female partners here unknown Amid confusion of assumed identitieAt French seaside Ch teau Blissac, J Wellington Gedge from California wants to go home His larger richer wife wants him to be a Paris Ambassador, blackmails Senator Opal, publicly dry, with a letter to his bootlegger in her safe Jewels attract criminals tough Soup Slattery and Oily Carlisle, who mourn female partners here unknown Amid confusion of assumed identities and one real undercover detective, Packy Patrick Franklyn, rich ex Yale footballer, wants Jane Opal to be happy Jane s fianc poor writer Egg Blair Eggleston is touted by Packy s fianc e culture lofty Lady Beatrice Bracken Rakish Veek Vicomte de Blissac returns for holiday festival where men drink, fight, and find love or at least reward from safe.

    • Ã Hot Water || Ø PDF Read by Ñ P.G. Wodehouse
      188 P.G. Wodehouse
    • thumbnail Title: Ã Hot Water || Ø PDF Read by Ñ P.G. Wodehouse
      Posted by:P.G. Wodehouse
      Published :2019-04-23T11:46:43+00:00

    About P.G. Wodehouse


    1. Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, KBE, was a comic writer who enjoyed enormous popular success during a career of than seventy years and continues to be widely read over 40 years after his death Despite the political and social upheavals that occurred during his life, much of which was spent in France and the United States, Wodehouse s main canvas remained that of prewar English upper class society, reflecting his birth, education, and youthful writing career.An acknowledged master of English prose, Wodehouse has been admired both by contemporaries such as Hilaire Belloc, Evelyn Waugh and Rudyard Kipling and by recent writers such as Douglas Adams, Salman Rushdie and Terry Pratchett Sean O Casey famously called him English literature s performing flea , a description that Wodehouse used as the title of a collection of his letters to a friend, Bill Townend.Best known today for the Jeeves and Blandings Castle novels and short stories, Wodehouse was also a talented playwright and lyricist who was part author and writer of fifteen plays and of 250 lyrics for some thirty musical comedies He worked with Cole Porter on the musical Anything Goes 1934 and frequently collaborated with Jerome Kern and Guy Bolton He wrote the lyrics for the hit song Bill in Kern s Show Boat 1927 , wrote the lyrics for the Gershwin Romberg musical Rosalie 1928 , and collaborated with Rudolf Friml on a musical version of The Three Musketeers 1928.


    547 Comments


    1. Written at the height of his powers ‘Hot Water’ is Wodehouse’s most ambitious farce and certainly his most successful. It is possibly one of the most overlooked of Wodehouse’s farces due to it featuring none of his regular characters, although plenty of his regular types, and although is not unique in having a French location, it certainly is one of the few full novels to be entirely set in St Rocque, Wodehouse’s fictional Monte Carlo.That none of Wodehouse’s regular characters appea [...]

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    2. Mistaken identities. Compromising letters. Unfortunate engagements. Long-lost loves. Confidence men and safe-blowers and drunk people. Deliciously absurd and absurdly delicious, this is typical Wodehouse, and I mean that in the best way possible. There are reasons I love Wodehouse so much, and this book embodies all of them.The only problem with his books is how quickly you get through them, even when you're making an effort to savor them. Still, in the end, you're left with a warm, satisfied fe [...]

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    3. In my view, PG Wodehouse is the the greatest ever writer of English in terms of pure style. His prose is elegant, light, airy and seemingly effortless. There can surely be no more readable a writer. Wodehouse chose to devote his enviable talent to the creation of stories that can best be described as trifles. They are invariably fluffy comedies with preposterous plots and larger than life characters. Their sole purpose is entertainment. He is, of course, best known for his Jeeves and Wooster tal [...]

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    4. Excellent. And I finished it again in August of 2017.

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    5. This time, I listened to Jonathan Cecil's narration, rather than reading it. Usually brilliant, this was a bit of a struggle as so many of the characters are American, French, or Americans pretending to be French. But, ignoring this, I thought some of the exposition was more laboured than Wodehouse was at his very best, but the dialogue was as good as usual, and the complicated, but easy to follow, plotting was absolutely stunning, with some good surprises near the end. So, overall a 4*.The GR b [...]

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    6. Hot Water is a delightful farce set in the north of France at the Chateau Blissac, Brittany and in London, containing a mixture of romance, intrigue and Wodehouse's brand of humor.The story recounts the various romantic and criminal goings-on during a house party, hosted by the Vicomte Blissac. It was another reminder to me what a ‘serious business’ comedy is. Supposedly one of Wodehouse’s more elaborate farces; I appreciated ‘visiting with a very different set of characters—not that I [...]

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    7. A jolly good read from dependable PGWd so pleasing to know that there are many more where that came from

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    8. Typical brilliant PGW romantic farce. Great stuff. Definite reread!

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    9. Wodehouse is hilarious. A smile on every page!

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    10. I came round to this at the end. I've discovered that the way to enjoy Wodehouse fully is to make sure you read good stretches of him at a sitting: the plots are so intricate that if you read just a few pages before drifting off at night, you are hopelessly stuck as to who was pretending to be whom when you next pick the book up.Anyway, I think this was the most elaborately plotted piece of his I've read, and I'm not going to attempt any sort of summary. Suffice it to say that I wanted all the t [...]

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    11. Subtle humour is probably the most challenging kind of humour there is. The art of making people laugh with simple, but insightful observations as opposed to crude, in-your-face one-liners has been attempted by many, but mastered by few. The stalwart of subtle humour in the vocal form is undoubtedly Jerry Seinfeld. In literature, there is no one to match the genius and the cutthroat delivery of P. G. Wodehouse.“Hot Water” is a work testimonial to Wodehouse’s impeccable writing flair. After [...]

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    12. This is the most intricately woven Wodehouse that I've read so far. A bubble map or flow chart type diagram would be required to fully explain the plot. Yet, somehow, it still feels like the same simple, pleasant, wonderful Wodehouse. This story finds around a dozen or so characters converging on the Château Blissac. Only about half of them are who they say they are. Nearly everyone has designs on breaking into the Château's safe for one reason or another. And nobody has a clue what is going o [...]

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    13. One of Wodehouse's best works! The plot was excellent, with a few unexpected twists that made for an exciting read. It also helped that the main character, Packy Franklyn, was thoroughly likeable. Fairly intelligent (unlike Bertie and some of the other young men that Wodehouse commonly portrays), warm-hearted and a 'man of action', his bright ideas enable him to get out of quite a few scrapes and eventually save the day!

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    14. The plot gets inextricably entangled towards the end and just when you begin to think that this time PG Wodehouse has overreached himself, he pulls off a fantastic climax and brings about a denouement that leaves everyone happy, satisfied and smiling. Brilliant!

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    15. Like Wodehouse's book "French Leave", this is a twist on the usual Wodehouse with a plot centred on Americans in France, no doubt to appeal to his growing American public at that time. The format doesn't work that well for me.

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    16. finished it on Friday updated now.

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    17. One of the funniest books I've ever read; Wodehouse is quickly becoming one of my very favorite authors.

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    18. After a harrowing novel or two, I always go back to Wodehouse for a bit of light relief. He supplies that in bucket-loads here. Just the quality of the prose, which flows so elegantly mixing deep satire with nonsensical farce in a light way that is so easy to read, makes this worth the read alone. Add to that some of Wodehouse's most ridiculous coincidences and a brand new range of typecast yet strangely three-dimensional characters, and you have a real gem.For the stalwarts - there are no regul [...]

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    19. This novel is set in a French town, in a chateau which is being rented out by the wealthy Mr and Mrs Gedge. A steady stream of visitors arrive, many of them not who they seem to be There’s a large cast of main characters in this book. I found it difficult, at times, to keep track of who was whom, particularly when so many were masquerading as someone else. By the time I was about three-quarters of the way through I had to re-read the first couple of chapters, as I’d forgotten some of what ha [...]

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    20. Bit below par it seemed to me. I was thinking about the cliche "X on a bad day is still better than most Ys at their best", and it seems to me that it doesn't apply here: sometimes with Wodehouse you get the impression he's straining after his own tone, and when he misses it, he can be pretty pedestrian. Example: there's a little running bit on the theme of an imaginary German sociologist with precise statistics for how young men rejected in love will react. On a good day Wodehouse could no doub [...]

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    21. One of the most underrated books of P.G.Woodehouse. This book has such a convoluted plot that even Woodehouse felt that there was "too much of plot", nevertheless; it makes for an irreproachable humorous story telling experience in the famous technique of his. A casual read which necessitates that the technicalities and feasibilities of such happenings not be taken too seriously. Most characters show a lack of common sense and moral turpitude leading to unpredictable twists and hilarious turns. [...]

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    22. Nothing new plot-wise, incorporating, as it does, domineering wives, young people in love, professional criminals, American politicians, and various persons pretending to be what they are not in pursuit of something (in this case, some priceless jewels and a compromising letter). But it represents the author at the top of his form. It is a particularly pleasant novel coming, as it does, directly after three distinctly disappointing Wodehouse opuses, and it is wonderful to find he is still a mast [...]

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    23. A wonderful hilarious farce with hijinks throughout. Two couples mismatched a couple of crooks, a chateau in France all add up to laughter. Senator Opal, Packy, a Vicounte and Soup Slattery to name a few characters all add to the laughter. Jewels, blackmail, lots of booze and twists and turns throughout. The wordplay Wodehouse uses is simply superb and funny. A great easy book to read and I can see why he is such a popular author.

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    24. (Shared read-aloud.)If you generally like Wodehouse, you'll like this book, too. I wouldn't say it was one of my personal favorites (maybe a bit repetitive at times, too many American characters, lacking the typical English country house setting and the cozily familiar recurring characters), but it was still very good.Hot Water is light and funny, with all the twisty plotting, witty humor, and charm you'd expect from the author.

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    25. I randomly picked this up for a quarter at a library sale, best quarter I've ever spent. This book is absolutely hilarious, and a complete breath of fresh air from the normally depressing material I read. The situations these characters get themselves into are just so ridiculous and wacky, all building up to a fantastic climax. I can't wait to read more Wodehouse.

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    26. absolutely hilarious, of course

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    27. I could read this over and over. Classic Wodehouse, with the usual cast of stock characters, but fresh plots, intrigues, and relationships. I've read this 3x and it never gets old.

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