Chasing Alaska: A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now

  • Title: Chasing Alaska: A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now
  • Author: C.B. Bernard
  • ISBN: 9780762778461
  • Page: 112
  • Format: Paperback
  • Chasing Alaska A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now Alaska looms as a mythical savage place part nature preserve part theme park too vast to understand fully Which is why C B Bernard lashed his canoe to his truck and traded the comforts of the Lowe
    Alaska looms as a mythical, savage place, part nature preserve, part theme park, too vast to understand fully Which is why C.B Bernard lashed his canoe to his truck and traded the comforts of the Lower 48 for a remote island and a career as a reporter It turned out that a distant relation had made the same trek northwest a century earlier Captain Joe Bernard spent decaAlaska looms as a mythical, savage place, part nature preserve, part theme park, too vast to understand fully Which is why C.B Bernard lashed his canoe to his truck and traded the comforts of the Lower 48 for a remote island and a career as a reporter It turned out that a distant relation had made the same trek northwest a century earlier Captain Joe Bernard spent decades in Alaska, amassing the largest single collection of Native artifacts ever gathered, giving his name to landmarks and even a now extinct species of wolf C.B chased the legacy of this explorer and hunter up the family tree, tracking his correspondence, locating artifacts donated to museums, and finding his journals at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks Using these journals as guides, C.B threw himself into the state once known as Seward s Folly, boating to remote islands, hiking distant forests, hunting and fishing the pristine landscape He began to form a landscape view of the place that had lured him and Uncle Joe, both men anchored beneath the Northern Lights in freezing, far flung waters, separated only by time Here, in crisp, crystalline prose, is his moving portrait of the Last Frontier, then and now.

    • [PDF] Download ó Chasing Alaska: A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now | by í C.B. Bernard
      112 C.B. Bernard
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ó Chasing Alaska: A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now | by í C.B. Bernard
      Posted by:C.B. Bernard
      Published :2019-08-12T19:26:30+00:00

    About C.B. Bernard


    1. C.B Bernard is a freelance writer and the author of Chasing Alaska A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now Lyons Press , a finalist for the Oregon Book Award, a Publishers Weekly Top 10 Travel Pick, and a National Geographic top travel choice He lives in Portland, OR, with his wife and a temperamental bird dog named Shakespeare.Want to invite him to visit your store, book club, or other venue, or invite him fly fishing or just out for drinks Drop him an email through his website, cbbernard


    436 Comments


    1. Rare is the great travel book that gives us far more than a recounting of some place new to the writer, but here we have one. This amazing volume skillfully weaves together memoir, history, self-discovery, geography, sociology, and a comparison of wild Alaska a half-century before statehood, with that of nearly a half-century after. Author C.B. Bernard followed a restless, wandering instinct to the shores of our largest, remotest, and most incomprehensible state. What he found there was astonish [...]

      Reply

    2. I don't ever use the word compelling lightly. In fact whenever I read a review about a book being "compelling", I often scoff at the review. However, this book deserves that word, and more. Chasing Alaska, is about backbone, and about the author's search to find his family history, as well as the ability to create history using the knowledge of Joe Bernard's Arctic explorations. I couldn't put the book down, and I don't think you will either. This book was fascinating, and just the right amount [...]

      Reply

    3. The first half of the book reads like a long article from a newspaper journalist. The last part was more flowing, he didn't try as hard, and as a result it was much better. As a former resident of Alaska, I still like reading about this great state. I also liked the author's link to the past, Joe Bernard, arctic explorer in the early 20th century, whose journeys the author tries with sporadic success to link to. Read this book, but make sure you read "Coming Into The Country" by John McPhee.

      Reply

    4. 4.5 stars. The subject (Alaska) is riveting. The story (the author discovered that the long-ago travels of a relative of his mirrored his own) is amazing. The writing style is superb. The only thing keeping it from the coveted 5-star rating is the way Bernard hints at important personal details but doesn't reveal them. It gives the book a kind of disjointed feeling at times because we're not sure why he's telling us what he's telling us. A small criticism. Read the book. Trust me - if you have a [...]

      Reply

    5. In a gift shop in Palmer, Alaska, a beautiful blue book cover caught my eye -- C.B. Bernard's "Chasing Alaska: A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now." Sometimes you *can* judge a book by its cover -- this was is a keeper, still on our shelf, waiting for another read-through someday. This says a lot when you have just so much space in an RV for printed books. "Southeast Alaskans call it a sucker hole when a patch of blue opens in the clouds and suckers you into thinking the sky is clearing [...]

      Reply

    6. Rare is the great travel book that gives us far more than a recounting of some place new to the writer, but here we have one. This amazing volume skillfully weaves together memoir, history, self-discovery, geography, sociology, and a comparison of wild Alaska a half-century before statehood, with that of nearly a half-century after.Author C.B. Bernard followed a restless, wandering instinct to the shores of our largest, remotest, and most incomprehensible state. What he found there was astonishi [...]

      Reply

    7. C.B. Bernard's book meanders through topics just as he has meandered through his beloved northwest frontier country. While I like to tear through books that want the reader to grab the bit like a racehorse, Chasing Alaska is much more sedate and wants its readers to absorb its insights at a slower pace. So it took me a while to read.The book covers lots of history that I never learned and touches on several hot-button current topics that I have heard of but didn't feel compelled to learn more ab [...]

      Reply

    8. I loved this book. I won a copy of this book in a Giveaway. I, like so many others, am facinated by Alaska. I was initially interested in the book since my brother in law was stationed there while in the Air Force and my sister has travelled there (in the summer) many times.The book opens with the authors arrival and adaptation to life in Alaska and how he found that one of his ancestors was a pioneer in the discovery of the artic. Once I got to the part where I found out the author no longer l [...]

      Reply

    9. I cannot recommend this book more highly to anyone visiting Alaska, or wanting to know about the US's largest state.C. B. Bernard, a journalist, replants himself from his easy life in Massachusetts to Sitka, Alaska. There he discovers a distant relative who made a similar life change in the early 20th century from Canada to discover the Arctic.The book covers not just Alaska today but the discoveries and anthropological studies of Captain Joe Bernard. It gave me a better understanding of what I [...]

      Reply

    10. My kind of book!!The info on Sitka (a Favorite place!) was fascinating. Wonderful surprise to learn of the author's serendipitous discovery of his(distant)relative - Joe Bernard - who was one of the most outstanding Arctic explorers, though not as publicized. Much info about other explorers who Joe Bernard interacted with - many that I've read about in other books. That's the problem with interest in history . . .One book begets the next, begets the next, begets the next. NOW, I'll HAVE to read [...]

      Reply

    11. I bought this book as we left for our most recent trip to Alaska. Alaska is an amazing place, so vast, beautiful and hard to describe. C. B Bernard describes it beautifully. His words bring back memories of places I have been and describe places I would like to go. It was fascinating to read about his discovery of an ancestor who was an explorer of Alaska and lived his life there. I enjoyed the stories from his journals. This book is not quick read, rather one to be savored and enjoyed.

      Reply

    12. Bernard's approach of mixing in diary entries from his great uncle with his own modern narrative helps weave a rich context in which the reader is drawn into Alaska. At times Bernard overplays the parallels between their two lives, but the overall story and picture it presents is interesting nonetheless. Now that I've finished reading it, I want to go to Alaska (and real Alaska, not cruise ship Alaska).

      Reply

    13. When the author moved to Alaska, he finds out that a relative lived in the same town and was buried a short walk from his home, about 100 years before. This book tells both of their stories. It is well written and I thought he had a really good ending to it. One of these daysI'll get to Alaska!

      Reply

    14. Really enjoyable read, if you have any interest in Alaska or in the early frontier of Polar exploration. The author intertwines his story of living and visiting Alaska with those of a distant relative, Joe Bernard, one of the first white men to explore, trade, and live in Polar Alaska in the early part of the 1900's.

      Reply

    15. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and highly recommend it to anyone who has been to Alaska and appreciates the scale, beauty, and landscape of this great state. An enlightening read with sobering truths. Thank-you!

      Reply

    16. Well written, engaging narrative.The author used this book to express a few "pet peeves." One (and maybe two) of these instances could have been expressed less vehemently. But this did not detract from my enjoyment of the book.

      Reply

    17. It was a fascinating read and look at Alaska, both in the early 20th and 21st centuries. I would recommend a basic knowledge of Alaska's geography, and a bit of history, to really get the most from this book.

      Reply

    18. A slow read, but that's always the case for me when Im reading historical or geographical booksI savor them.

      Reply

    19. I started this before our trip to Alaska this summer and finished it while there. I really enjoyed it and felt I learned a lot from this book - more than I would have from just a travel guide.

      Reply

    20. Originally intrigued by Peter Geye's review from the Sunday Star Tribune books page. I wasn't disappointed. A unique memoir and travelogue. I'm not sure there is any place quite like Alaska.

      Reply

    21. Really enjoyed the story of the author's sojourn to Alaska and especially how it paralleled his distant relative. A compelling read that I would highly recommend.

      Reply

    22. Well written book of Alaska then and now. Much better than most in this genre!! Enjoyed this!

      Reply

    23. A very interesting story, more historical than contemporary. Connection turns out to be charming.

      Reply

    24. I was delighted to win a copy of this book and I am greatly looking forward to reading it.

      Reply

    25. Alaska – Ever ResilientC. B. Bernard, an aspiring writer, gets offered two jobs in Alaska, both working for local newspapers. Nome offers him a reporter’s slot on the Nome Nugget, while Sitka’s Sentinel pitched him a similar deal. It was not a tough decision as the Southeast’s rainy climes and gorgeous wooded areas won hands down over the treeless, stripped landscapes of Nome. Sitka proved to be an ideal spot for Bernard to begin his Alaskan relationship. The reason turned out to be some [...]

      Reply

    26. As advertised, Bernard has written a book that is part travelogue, part history, and part memoir. He leaves his home and unrewarding job in Massachusetts and heads, by pickup truck, to Sitka, Alaska, where he has been offered a job as a newspaper reporter. Just before leaving, his father tells him of a distant relative, “Uncle” Joe Bernard, who, at one time, lived in Sitka.Once in Sitka, the author pursues the “story” of Uncle Joe, who, it turns out, was an important, but historically ov [...]

      Reply

    27. C.B. Bernard went to Alaska to work as a reporter for the Sitka Sentinel in 1999, not knowing that two other Bernards had passed that way before him. When he found out that his great uncles, Joe and Peter Bernard, had been arctic explorers at the turn of the century, he decided to research their legacy. When he found Uncle Joe’s grave fifty yards behind his home in Sitka, he was compelled by the hand of fate to write a book that would take him on a journey that spanned both time and the vast r [...]

      Reply

    28. I can't say I actually read every word of this book. I read the first 1/3 and then started to skim it. My favorite parts were Bernard's excerpts from his ancestor Joe Bernard's accounts of exploring the same territory in the early 1900s. They were more interesting (and fewer) then Bernard's somewhat disjointed accounts of his own experience in Alaska. He begins telling of his experiences when he first got there and then jumped to the time when 7 years later he was returning with his wife. He's a [...]

      Reply

    29. I won this book from and was very thrilled to get it. This book about our 49th state was wrote by CB Bernard and through research he has done he gives us a look at the real Alaska both through his eyes and the eyes of his relative he never truly knew. I so loved so many parts of this book. I loved his prose writing style, it was so touching,but also for me there was just to much data data data in there to. I think to sell this book they should give away previews of chapter five and the book wou [...]

      Reply

    30. 3.5 stars. I enjoyed a good portion of the book, but felt that I was plodding along at times. Did I learn a lot about Alaska? YES! I certainly could visualize much of the scenery and various parts of the state. I felt the extreme cold & fear experienced by the author's uncle. I enjoyed the sense of beauty and wonder shared by Bernard. Being a lover of salmon, I certainly gained new information on the different types and their value. But it took me much longer to read this book than is my nor [...]

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *