The Great Quillow

  • Title: The Great Quillow
  • Author: James Thurber Doris Lee
  • ISBN: 9780156364904
  • Page: 354
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Great Quillow This contemporary fairy tale by one of America s best loved authors brings style and humor to the familiar folk theme of overcoming brute strength with intelligence and courage The artwork captures th
    This contemporary fairy tale by one of America s best loved authors brings style and humor to the familiar folk theme of overcoming brute strength with intelligence and courage The artwork captures the bustle and the bickering of the story as well as the terror and the wonder A fine choice to read aloud, even to children who could read it to themselves Booklist

    • [PDF] Download ½ The Great Quillow | by ë James Thurber Doris Lee
      354 James Thurber Doris Lee
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      Posted by:James Thurber Doris Lee
      Published :2019-04-26T22:58:07+00:00

    About James Thurber Doris Lee


    1. Thurber was born in Columbus, Ohio to Charles L Thurber and Mary Agnes Mame Fisher Thurber Both of his parents greatly influenced his work His father, a sporadically employed clerk and minor politician who dreamed of being a lawyer or an actor, is said to have been the inspiration for the small, timid protagonist typical of many of his stories Thurber described his mother as a born comedienne and one of the finest comic talents I think I have ever known She was a practical joker, on one occasion pretending to be crippled and attending a faith healer revival, only to jump up and proclaim herself healed.Thurber had two brothers, William and Robert Once, while playing a game of William Tell, his brother William shot James in the eye with an arrow Because of the lack of medical technology, Thurber lost his eye This injury would later cause him to be almost entirely blind During his childhood he was unable to participate in sports and activities because of his injury, and instead developed a creative imagination, which he shared in his writings.From 1913 to 1918, Thurber attended The Ohio State University, where he was a member of the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity He never graduated from the University because his poor eyesight prevented him from taking a mandatory ROTC course In 1995 he was posthumously awarded a degree.From 1918 to 1920, at the close of World War I, Thurber worked as a code clerk for the Department of State, first in Washington, D.C and then at the American Embassy in Paris, France After this Thurber returned to Columbus, where he began his writing career as a reporter for the Columbus Dispatch from 1921 to 1924 During part of this time, he reviewed current books, films, and plays in a weekly column called Credos and Curios, a title that later would be given to a posthumous collection of his work Thurber also returned to Paris in this period, where he wrote for the Chicago Tribune and other newspapers.In 1925, he moved to Greenwich Village in New York City, getting a job as a reporter for the New York Evening Post He joined the staff of The New Yorker in 1927 as an editor with the help of his friend and fellow New Yorker contributor, E.B White His career as a cartoonist began in 1930 when White found some of Thurber s drawings in a trash can and submitted them for publication Thurber would contribute both his writings and his drawings to The New Yorker until the 1950s.Thurber was married twice In 1922, Thurber married Althea Adams The marriage was troubled and ended in divorce in May 1935 Adams gave Thurber his only child, his daughter Rosemary Thurber remarried in June, 1935 to Helen Wismer His second marriage lasted until he died in 1961, at the age of 66, due to complications from pneumonia, which followed upon a stroke suffered at his home His last words, aside from the repeated word God, were God bless God damn, according to Helen Thurber.


    190 Comments


    1. This is a definite favorite. It's got a giant in it though so be prepared if you have any kids who might be afraid of an ugly giant. Also, there are three editions of this. The best, best, best, illustrated one is by Steven Kellogg--another family favorite. His illustrations are amazing! 5-12 Oh! it's about a toymaker who outwits a giant to save the village. it's really cute.

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    2. Funny how ideas are formed in childhood. I reached adulthood with a very clear picture of what went on in the meetings of boards of directors, based solely on The Great Quillow and Little Women. Turned out to be surprisingly accurate, at that.An entrancing fable about not underestimating people, or undervaluing talents.

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    3. Enchanting children's story. Amazed and a little saddened I've never been exposed to Thurber before now.

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    4. فوق العاده بودمرا به شدّت به یاد «هانی کوتوله و آقاغوله» ی محبوبم انداخت

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    5. با مزّه بود و طورِ احمقانه یِ دوست داشتنی ای.

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    6. So, I am now on a Thurber kick, loving his word play in the Thirteen Clocks, the Wonderful O and the White Deer. Now I move to his stuff for younger children and it is equally delightful, a story of how a toymaker helps safe his town from the ravages of a giant.Just wish the illustrations in the used edition I had bought online were nicer. This would be a wonderful book to read to nephews and nieces -- or sons and daughters. . .

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    7. This book is really fun. It is a great story of how brains can overcome brawn. I also liked that a member of society who is a bit of an outcast or at least less valued shows that every skill has its merits. As my kids listened to the story they had fun as they started to guess what would happen next.

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    8. Need a salve after Christopher Marlowe's Edward II.Narrator: Peter UstinovMusic: Ed SummerlinPublication:Book copyright 1944, Harcourt Brace JovanovichAlbum copyright 1972, Caedmon Records (TC1411)

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    9. an excellent children's book, with excellent illustrations, which are far superior to any other illustrator's attempts for this Thurber fairy tale

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    10. شايد كه خيلى خيلى خوب نيود. ولى بسيار دوست داشتنى بود و آدم وقتى فكر ميكند كه شايد بهتر باشه كه بهش چهار بدم ميبينه كه نه! همون پنج بهتره براش :) :) :>

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    11. Here's the one with Steven Kellogg's illustrations!

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