The Folly of the World

  • Title: The Folly of the World
  • Author: Jesse Bullington
  • ISBN: 9780316190350
  • Page: 155
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Folly of the World On a stormy night in the North Sea delivers a devastating blow to Holland the Saint Elizabeth Flood a deluge of biblical proportions that drowns hundreds of towns thousands of people and fore
    On a stormy night in 1421, the North Sea delivers a devastating blow to Holland the Saint Elizabeth Flood, a deluge of biblical proportions that drowns hundreds of towns, thousands of people, and forever alters the geography of the Low Countries Where the factions of the noble Hooks and the merchant Cods waged a literal class war but weeks before, there is now only a nigOn a stormy night in 1421, the North Sea delivers a devastating blow to Holland the Saint Elizabeth Flood, a deluge of biblical proportions that drowns hundreds of towns, thousands of people, and forever alters the geography of the Low Countries Where the factions of the noble Hooks and the merchant Cods waged a literal class war but weeks before, there is now only a nigh endless expanse of grey water, a desolate inland sea with moldering church spires jutting up like sunken tombstones For a land already beleaguered by generations of civil war, a worse disaster could scarce be imagined.Yet even disaster can be profitable, for the right sort of individual, and into this flooded realm sail three conspirators a deranged thug at the edge of madness, a ruthless conman on the cusp of fortune, and a half feral girl balanced between them With The Folly of the World, Jesse Bullington has woven an extraordinary new tale of the depraved and the desperate.

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      Posted by:Jesse Bullington
      Published :2019-08-14T02:31:05+00:00

    About Jesse Bullington


    1. Author Dream Weaver Visionary Plus Actor So long as you re cool with discovering just how dull I really am, I welcome adds here, on FB, LJ etc.My novels The Sad Tale of the Brothers Grossbart and The Enterprise of Death are available in a variety of languages I have it on admittedly shaky authority that they are charming My third novel, The Folly of the World, will be released in December of 2012 no word yet on how charming it will be, but I m sure I ll be the first to know I have short fiction free for the reading at Beneath Ceaseless Skies and Brain Harvest, among sundry other places a full ish, depending on how slack I ve been about updating it list of my published works can be found on this here website.As for Good Reads, I m only going to include books that I review, even briefly, to prevent myself from spending all day online assembling a massive list of beloved books I tend to only review books I finish and only finish books I like, so my ratings tend to be on the high side.


    211 Comments


    1. review by Justin Blazier posted originally on fantasyliterature In a flooded 15th century Holland there are very few opportunities available. Jan may have an amazing opportunity at a life full of riches, but it’s hidden somewhere at the bottom of a flooded town. To reach his greedy goal in the dark moldy depths, Jan enlists the help of a wild young girl with a knack for swimming. Add Jan’s slightly psychotic but ever-faithful partner Sander to the mix and you have yourself a watery adventure [...]

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    2. I don't know how to feel about this book, and how it ended. The reader is left VERY unsatisfied, but, well, something about that unsatisfaction is satisfying. I guess its just written so very well you can't help but like the ending, even as you're hating not knowing the answers to so many questions. I mean really. SO MANY QUESTIONS. Also, it was rather more graphically violent than I normally like in a book. But the violence is used well, I guess. It's not just there to make the reader feel unco [...]

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    3. This book had potential but I bailed on it around page 100. Jesse Bullington is a talented writer, but the book simply grossed me out- and I don't gross out easily. The book was not my cup of tea.

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    4. Bought this on a whim for a dollar or so. It's a sort of historical fiction adventure story that I wouldn't normally have picked for myself. As a result it's rather different from anything else I've read. Although I won't search out his other books, I really did enjoy reading something outside my alley(s), and I found this a little spooky and somehow charming at the oddest moments, and overall well written. I think my lasting impression is going to be amusement that it managed to charm me.

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    5. Jesse Bullington's latest! With each new book, Bullington's craft improves, honed by a formidably visceral imagination and what is clearly a passion for medieval European history not to mention an affinity for the lowly rogues, cheats and outsiders skulking in the shadows. Folly displays an impressively tight sense of plotting and place. The spooky and damp floodlands of Holland where terrible secrets linger amongst the reed and the mud and the drowned farms.Jan, the con-man, recruits Jolanda, t [...]

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    6. charming, vulgar nonsense. I loved it even as I loathed it. No questions are answered and the end of the book feels no different to the other chapter breaks. It's like the author just got up and wandered away. The pace is bipolar, fast and slooooooooow, manic and dour. The moral of the story appears to be "even terrible people fall in love. " It doesn't make them nicer. It just means that they kiss each other between all of the horrible things they do. I'm furious. I don't demand all the answers [...]

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    7. potential it had

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    8. Occasionally going from mysterious to plain confusing, but on the whole a fun and interesting read.

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    9. When you find yourself actually openly screaming at the last 100 pages of a book, it's either a really really good thing or a really really bad thing. In this case, it was a little bit of both. I went into the book grimacing and wincing at the characters and the violence and by the end being completely hooked into their well being and their life choices. And oh my god, those life choices.I am going to preface the rest of this review by warning you now that if you are squeamish, homophobic, or do [...]

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    10. Less than a quarter of the way through The Folly of the World, the question of how the remaining three-hundred-odd pages would be filled was very real; though the setting was fifteenth-century Holland, it is character-based fiction, more at home in the fantasy genre than alternate history. The plot, up to that point, involved a quest to find a representative (née magical) MacGuffin that would change the lives of the three crusaders forever—the draw was that the characters themselves were call [...]

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    11. If you've ever read Jesse Bullington, then you know he's quickly become known for his darkly humorous, delightfully obscene, disgustingly fantastic tales of humans failings and obsessions. His characters are no more attractive than the vulgar language with which he tells their tales, and nothing is ever safe - or, worse, sacred. While The Folly of the World tries a bit too hard to top its predecessors in terms of characters or narrative, it's still a fascinating tale that offers up Bullington's [...]

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    12. I loved Jesse Bullington's first two novels for their color and life and transgressive imagination. His prose and characterization have always been good, too--the opening sequence of Enterprise of Death is one of the most memorable fantasy sections I've read. But the first two novels were undermined a bit for me by the sense that Bullington hadn't quite mastered the structure of the novel yet. I was excited that he'd written three of these standalone medieval novels not just for the abundance of [...]

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    13. Have I mentioned that I will do anything Flavorpill tells me to? Here's what they say about this one, which is on their "10 New Must-Reads for December" list:Fans of Bullington’s gruesome romp The Enterprise of Death will be excited to hear of his newest novel. In a Holland recast as a watery wonderland after a flood, the hanging-happy Sander and his partner Jan will get up to loads of trouble, their exploits rendered in Bullington’s trademark wit, bonkers black humor, and mischievous imagin [...]

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    14. Once again, as with The Enterprise of Death, I was absolutely enthralled. Jesse Bullington has an incredible talent for evoking the settings of another time and place and completely bringing it to life. Add to that all of the brilliant action, mystery, suspense, horror, and characters so compelling they demand a sequel, and you have one hell of a great novel.

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    15. Lovably grotesque -- this novel contains what I think is Bullington's best character yet, the revolting and yet somehow oddly cute patricide and noted noose fetishist Sander Himbrecht -- if anything can be said to contain him. There's a little of everything here, sword fights, sex, cats, catfish, sheep jokes, cloaks, daggers, murder and intrigue, a prickly dowager, the humor and horror of history, and enough seedy situations to sprout a whole field of something. Probably something nasty.

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    16. Incredibly graphic. I was hoping I would get more answers and then, just like that, it was over. I enjoyed every bit of it, even the abrupt ending. "Two damned spirits, ignorant of their fates and condemned to play out some ghoulish tragedy." Update: it's been a week since I finished reading this book and it's still consuming my thoughts.

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    17. 2 StarsI am a big fan of Jesse Bullington and I really enjoyed his previous novels. I cannot finish this book at this time. It has taken me far too long to reach the midway point. I simply cannot see any reason to go on. This book is tame and lame compared to his previous books. I do not care about any of the characters and the world is just ok. Book closesd.

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    18. Jesse has done it again-- it's like a wild ride through a Breugel-Bosch fun fare attraction, but somehow manages to be deeply human at the same time and rooted in rich historical accuracy. Jo will be one of my favourite literary characters for many years to come-- maybe always.

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    19. This book isdifferent. Not what I really expected from historical fiction, but I should have known that going in since I found this in the Sci-Fi/Fantasy section. Definitely going to read Mr. Bullington's other books now

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    20. Very strong and engrossing while not for the weak of heart

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    21. i read all the 3, 2, and 1 star reviews, and i had reservations about this book, but i had read another book by him, and wanted to read this. i will never trust a negative review again. yeah, it was profane, and yeah, it wasn't a tidy perfect ending, but the writing was good, the story was interesting, it wasn't gross or disgusting, it was humorous, and it had a good ending. it's a fantasy novel, and i enjoyed it. it's not like other fantasy novels and it isn't too predictable and it isn't' cook [...]

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    22. Jesse Bullington is not an amazing writer, but damn can he write an interesting story. And with him coming from a background of studying history, I think that counts for a lot, because reading history can be boring. He fits very nicely in the space where historical fiction borders on the fantastic, giving you just enough of a taste of the surreal to keep things moving. The story does slow down around the last third of the book and to some might have a bit of a mundane ending, but I was left sati [...]

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    23. I think the thing I loved most about this book is that you think you know what the general plot is going to be, and then you find yourself at the end of that story arc with half the book to go. It's the first time in a long time that I've had no idea what was going to happen. No character is safe, you can't trust the narrator, and any time you think you could predict the book's path a wrench is thrown into the whole thing.

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    24. Bullington's books are always a bit difficult to review. The language and descriptions are far more graphic than you would find from an average novel and it's not easy to predict twists and turns. How the characters ended up in this book, it surprised me a little. Would have expected a much more pessimistic ending. But it was a good surprise, as I was rooting for both characters. Not a perfect book, but pretty good nevertheless.

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    25. I love Bullington's style and his weird historical settings! The first third of the book is absolutely amazing. The chapters about Jolanda diving are the main highlight for me - I will definitely return to the book to re-read these parts. However, I found the rest of the book uneven and lacking focus. There are still great episodes, but just not on par with the high beginning.

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    26. I like Jesse's other books better but have a sneaking suspicion that if I read it again I'll like it more. Its a weird feeling and I don't know why I feel that way about it.

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    27. Awesome book but the ending was a bit confusing.

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    28. This was my third of Bullington's books, and it made great vacation reading. It's delightfully graphic, and the story moved along at a good clip. It slowed some in the middle, and the ending left me asking several questions, but I enjoyed the adventures of Jan, Sander, and Jolinda.

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    29. After reading The Sad Tale of the Brothers Grossbart about a year ago I had kept my eye on Jesse Bullington. (I would also like to quickly note that Mr. Bullington might just have the best facial hair in the genre. Move over Patrick Rothfuss!!!) His newest book The Folly of the World caught my eye for two reasons. The first being the beautiful cover art… I’ve heard that many authors don’t have a say when it comes to their cover art, and if that’s the case then Mr. Bullington is a very lu [...]

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    30. Here's the thing about The Folly of the World: the story was underwhelming, yet the book only made me love Jesse Bullington's writing even more.After reading (and loving) his previous work, this one wasn't quite on par. Still good, still worth a read, and by an author without the impressive catalog Bullington has, I would've been more hooked. So definitely go and read this, mortals, and enjoy it. And then if you haven't already, go read The Sad Tale of the Brothers Grossbart, because that novel [...]

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