722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York

  • Title: 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York
  • Author: Clifton Hood
  • ISBN: 9780801880544
  • Page: 375
  • Format: Paperback
  • Miles The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York When it first opened on October the New York City subway ran twenty two miles from City Hall to th Street and Lenox Avenue the longest stretch ever built at one time From that initial rou
    When it first opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City subway ran twenty two miles from City Hall to 145th Street and Lenox Avenue the longest stretch ever built at one time From that initial route through the completion of the IND or Independent Subway line in the 1940s, the subway grew to cover 722 miles long enough to reach from New York to Chicago.In this definitWhen it first opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City subway ran twenty two miles from City Hall to 145th Street and Lenox Avenue the longest stretch ever built at one time From that initial route through the completion of the IND or Independent Subway line in the 1940s, the subway grew to cover 722 miles long enough to reach from New York to Chicago.In this definitive history, Clifton Hood traces the complex and fascinating story of the New York City subway system, one of the urban engineering marvels of the twentieth century For the subway s centennial the author supplies a new foreward explaining that now, after a century, we can see clearly than ever that this rapid transit system is among the twentieth century s greatest urban achievements.

    • Unlimited [History Book] ☆ 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York - by Clifton Hood ↠
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    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [History Book] ☆ 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York - by Clifton Hood ↠
      Posted by:Clifton Hood
      Published :2019-04-07T22:57:12+00:00

    About Clifton Hood


    1. Clifton Hood Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York book, this is one of the most wanted Clifton Hood author readers around the world.


    939 Comments


    1. The seven train slowed to a stop in the Mets-Willets Point station and a distorted voice crackled onto the PA system: “Last stop, last stop everybody, this is the last stop, please exit the train.” Normally the seven goes to Flushing; but today it terminated one stop earlier because of track work. With a chorus of sighs and groans the passengers shuffled out and pushed down the stairs to the buses waiting on the street, a stopgap solution used when the subway is shut down. The buses were muc [...]

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    2. The New York subway system, much like the city itself, mocks hyperbole. The tracks, if stretched end to end, would travel from New York City to Chicago. It has its own police force of 4,250 employees, larger than that of Atlanta of Boston, and it has 469 stations. Forty-six percent of New Yorkers use it to travel to work and Wall Street would cease to function without it.The book recounts the numerous physical and political barriers that need to be surmounted in accomplishing the huge feat. It's [...]

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    3. For anyone who has taken New York City transit for granted, this book is a must read. In this work, Hood combines historical narrative, political history, geology and engineering together in a seamless manner to produce this excellent work. Most of all, Hood points out just what a staggering feat of engineering was the planning and construction of the NYC Subway system. Hood starts off by describing what New York was like in the 19th century, describing the mix of ethnic neighborhoods, the extre [...]

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    4. This was a frustrating read. The intro suggests that it was a PhD dissertation, but it read like a general urban history without a specific theme or focus. Perhaps the main point was how the subways contributed to the 'suburban' development of NYC outside of Manhattan Island, which the author showed fairly well. But otherwise it bounced around from a rah-rah urban transit praise piece to Tammany Hall politics to the virtues of subsidized transit to a sudden but incomplete focus on labor/class hi [...]

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    5. Recommended for transit and planning wonks. A few takeaways: attitudes about transit governance shift back and forth among public private partnerships, public control, and technocratic management. Things can get and stay very messed up for a long time with intractable conflicts of incompatible beliefs (low fares and a for-profit model). Subway planners *wanted* competing incompatible systems because they hated and feared powerful monopolies. Transportation and land use are tightly linked, and on [...]

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    6. A fascinating account of the building of the New York subway system, from the 19th century until 1953. At 250 pages, however, it feels a little rushed given the amount of material to cover.

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    7. Good, but wanting of more detail for the particularly interested

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    8. This book takes a complicated narrative and turns it into a readable and comprehensible story with engaging characters and real drama.The first character here is Abram S. Hewitt, the New York iron-manufactured who introduced the "open-hearth" process to the United States and, despite his reformist credentials, got himself elected mayor of the city in 1886 under the Tammany banner (they were worried about losing out to either the radical Henry George or a young Teddy Roosevelt). Two years later h [...]

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    9. This was more a history of the city of New York told through the construction of the subway system than the other way around, but I found it digestible and interesting. The most interesting aspect was the way the private sector actors were portrayed: rapacious and greedy, but efficient and determined. These are hoary and I don't think very universally accurate stereotypes, but it's rare that we see such wholesale control of something we might now regard as a utility being catalyzed and shaped so [...]

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    10. 3.5 Stars. This is a well researched and interesting look at the development of the NYC subway system. There is a lot of attention paid to the early politics and dream that took place. The entrepreneurial start up was intriguing compared to the fallout that occurred later in the timeline. It is interesting to review the fare rates and the infighting that happened. On the political front the back and forth of changes in theory and political practice was almost nauseating. Downside of the book is [...]

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    11. This book was interesting because the history of the NY subway is interesting. While it was easy to read, it tended to wander a bit. Also, the author is extremely opinionated, essentially says so in the prologue, and I felt like it skewed the book a bit more than it should. The book lacked all technical details about the building and operation of the subway. It also left huge gaps in details about what was built where. The maps are laughable due to lacking do much detail to be almost useless. Th [...]

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    12. I am fascinated by the New York City subway system and this book was a really good overview of how the system was established and evolved. It described the politicking and machinations behind the 3 systems and their starts, history writ large in subway tracks. More than an academic read.It took me over a year to finish, not because of the writing -- it is well-written -- but because I kept picking it up and putting it down because it required a bit more concentration than I usually give for fluf [...]

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    13. An enjoyable look at the early years of the New York City subway system. The author gives nice biographical sketches of the relevant political actors and does a decent job of explaining the interactions of different interest groups. The text got a bit dry sometimes and never quite came together as an overarching story instead of just a bunch of isolated historical decisions. Still, I learned quite a bit about how the lines developed and how the city's character was changed by the changing modes [...]

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    14. A well-written, well-researched book on a fascinating history. Rather than a long list of things that happened, Hood brings us insight to life in New York leading up to the building of the subways and places the development of the world famous subway system in perspective and in relation to life as it happened. Understanding how integral the subway system was to growth of New York City, and understanding how innovative the system was in mixing the classes from the very beginning. Their are enjoy [...]

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    15. It's an interesting read, although it gets a little dry. The bits about the city at the turn of the century, and in particular about my neighborhood, are most appealing to me (big surprise.) But when you're spending 10 pages on which company is going to get the building contracts and which assemblyman opposes said companies, you're bound to get a little bored.I bought this book a few years ago when I worked in midtown and took the subway everyday and was completely fascinated with the history an [...]

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    16. Kind of disappointing-- I thought it would be more about the more recent history of the subways (the 1970's-80's decline), but it's all about the construction and early years. This would be fine but the author focuses way too much on the bios of the people who dreamed up the subway and the mayors of NYC at key times-- I don't really care about these people. There should have been more emphasis on the construction itself and on how the individual lines were constructed (i.e and then they decided [...]

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    17. I wanted to like this book a lot more then I did. It is very informative but can get boring and dry at times. I have to admit while the amount of pictures is lacking the pictures they do have are cool. My main gripe is that the author, when talking about old subway lines, doesn't relate them to what they are called today. Sometimes it is hard to figure out exactly what he is talking about, especially since line and station names have changed dramatically since the early nineteen-hundreds. This c [...]

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    18. Mr. Hood's history of the subways is good as far as it goes. He stops the story in 1953 with the formation of the NYC Transit Authority. he blames many of the system's subsequent problems on the Authority but goes no farther in the history of the system. There is much more to the story. His conclusion that the subway would remain a failure has been proven wrong over time. The decline was steep but the road or track back to success is still being climbed. Mr. Hood should have continued the story. [...]

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    19. I really wanted to like this book, but it fell short of what I was hoping for. It focused entirely on the local politics that lead to the building of the subway, rather than a split between the politics and the engineering. Maybe as an engineer I'm just expecting too much from my histories, but I was really excited to learn how such a large subway with so many water-crossings was built.Worth a read if you're curious, but if you struggle with nonfiction it may be hard to get through.

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    20. Anyone who's lived in New York City long enough will recognize many of the names Steinway, Belmont, Hylan, and LaGuardia. But who knew they (and many others) were so key in building, developing, and changing our city's subway system?722 Miles is terribly informative, but can become overly dry at times, and a little repetitive of certain facts. A recommended read for anyone fascinated by public transit, the subway, and NYC history. You'll just have to be a bit dedicated to reach the end.

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    21. Probably the best layman's history available on the subject, although since it ends the urban renaissance of the '1990's, its outlook for the continued viability of mass transit is pretty dismal even by today's austerity-obsessed standards.

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    22. Ever wonder how they built the NYC subway? This popular history tells the tale with a special focus on political alliances, social progressives, and real estate magnates. After reading this, you will never take a ride for granted.

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    23. Aside from the history of the construction of the subway, this book has some interesting background on some of the attempts to insulate public services from the whims of politicians, including the founding of the Port Authority.

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    24. Really interesting content, if a little dry. Definitely has it's focus in the politics and people that allowed the subway to be built and operated as opposed to how the subway changed the make-up and neighborhoods of NYC.

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    25. This is another one of those books that I think will go into detail on how things are built, but instead go on endlessly about local politics, financing and social impact descriptions. It just never clicked for me, although I did get through the whole book. Just not an easy or interesting read.

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    26. In honor of our visiting historian, the byzantine political, topographical, social and economic development of the New York subway system

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    27. This book is about 15% a history of New York subways, and 85% a history of municipal financial instruments. Not particularly good unless you REALLY care about the New York subway.

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    28. Required reading for any college level history course on the history of the City of New York. A textbook treatise on the history of the NYC subway system,

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    29. Interesting, but too much politics makes it a slow read.

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    30. Interesting if you are interested in New York. An update would be appreciated.

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