Junia Is Not Alone

  • Title: Junia Is Not Alone
  • Author: Scot McKnight
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 154
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Junia Is Not Alone In this fierce essay leading Bible scholar Scot McKnight tells the story of Junia a female apostle honored by Paul in his Letter to the Romans and then silenced and forgotten for most of church hist
    In this fierce essay, leading Bible scholar Scot McKnight tells the story of Junia, a female apostle honored by Paul in his Letter to the Romans and then silenced and forgotten for most of church history But Junia s tragedy is not hers alone She s joined by fellow women in the Bible whose stories of bold leadership have been overlooked She s in the company of visionaryIn this fierce essay, leading Bible scholar Scot McKnight tells the story of Junia, a female apostle honored by Paul in his Letter to the Romans and then silenced and forgotten for most of church history But Junia s tragedy is not hers alone She s joined by fellow women in the Bible whose stories of bold leadership have been overlooked She s in the company of visionary women of God throughout the centuries whose names we ve forgotten, whose stories go untold, and whose witness we neglect to celebrate.But Junia is also joined by women today women who are no longer silent and who are experiencing a re voicing as they respond to God s call to lead us into all truth Patheos Press

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    About Scot McKnight


    1. Scot McKnight is a recognized authority on the New Testament, early Christianity, and the historical Jesus McKnight, author or editor of forty books, is the Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL Dr McKnight has given interviews on radios across the nation, has appeared on television, and is regularly speaks at local churches, conferences, colleges, and seminaries in the USA and abroad Dr McKnight obtained his Ph.D at the University of Nottingham 1986.


    265 Comments


    1. My wife gave birth to our first baby, a girl, on April 28.We named her Junia, after a little known character in the Bible. At the end of Romans the apostle Paul is greeting various people and he mentions Junia, a woman great among the apostles (Romans 16:7). That is all we know of Junia.But most have never heard of Junia. She was silenced because, well, everyone says women cannot be church leaders (or apostles) so if "Junia" was an apostle she had to be a man. Thus, "Junias" was born. McKnight's [...]

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    2. Short review: This is a very short book (really an article) on Junia and her history. We do not know much about Junia (mentioned only in Rom 16:7), but we do know that throughout much of the last 500 years of Christian history she has been referred to as a man or if acknowledges as a women was reduced from her role as an apostle.I wish there was more here. It really does not even scratch the surface. McKnight has a blog and this would make a better long blog article than a short book. It is wort [...]

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    3. I Read the Last Chapter in TearsThis is a short work - I read it in an afternoon of constant interruptions - the plumber was here restoring the water to both showers, fixing the water heater, etc. I am a Christian woman who has yearned to learn Biblical Greek and Hebrew for more than 20 years, but since I was raised in conservative Christian circles where a woman must be in submission to all men, never in authority, it was something I have never pursued, because I could see no real purpose in it [...]

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    4. A good read, and a story that needs to be told again and stressed, but I felt a bit cheated in paying $2.99 (a Kindle e-book) for something I was able to complete reading in less than 10 minutes.

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    5. Scot McKnight asks, "Why is there so much silence in the church about the women in the Bible?" Noting how few of his students (i.e none) had heard of Junia and other women in the Bible, he dedicates his short ebook to "ending the church's deafening silence on women in the Bible."Junia "appears innocently enough" in just one verse of the New Testament, Romans 16:7, "alongside her husband, Andronicus." McNight goes on to say that Junia "had no idea she would someday be the subject of endless discu [...]

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    6. This is a great book for anyone who is unsure of how they view the bible's statements on women in ministry, leadership, and culture or those who are open to the possibility of egalitarianism. If you aren't open to the idea then the only reason I can see for you to read this book is to make yourself angry. In it McKnight makes clear and pretty hard to argue with assertions as to why "Junias" in Romans is actually "Junia" (a woman not a man). This then is a great supporting argument for a lot of w [...]

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    7. Alleluiah!First of all, let me state proudly, but with a lot of frustration, that I am one of these silenced women. I am a seminary graduate, with some experience in teaching, pastoral counseling, preaching, and leading worship. But I have never been allowed to use these gifts for more than a few weeks at a time, and most of e time, not even that long. So you can probably imagine that I am very happy to see this small, but powerful book. Thank you, Scot, for so eloquently putting this book out t [...]

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    8. I am by no means a feminist, but it's utterly refreshing to hear a man argue so strongly for the position of women in ministry. McKnight does this in a short essay that examines how for years the story of Junia (Romans 16:7) was lost in translation - Bible translators silenced her role by making her a man in Bibles printed in much of the 20th century. McKnight sheds light on other outstanding unknown women (in and out of the Bible) who impacted the world because of their callings. My favorite pa [...]

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    9. Fascinating little book on a fascinating topic. Have male translaters of the bible erased a woman from the scriptures by changing her female name 'Junia' to the masculine 'Junias', mainly because the Apostle Paul refers to her as outstanding among the Apostles? Check your Bible if you are so inclined, Romans 16:7, I would bet you find the name 'Junias' I personally am disgusted by the way men have silenced and overlooked so many great women in the Bible. For example how many of you have ever eve [...]

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    10. Fantastic! This is actually the first piece I've read by Scot McKnight. I'm so glad I did (and I'll definitely be reading more asap!). This mini-book (a long essay, really) is an excellent mix of history of Bible translation (which, if you know me at all, you know that's like crack to me), confrontation of historical avoidance of the prominent role of women in the church at large, and telling the stories of real-life women who rise to the call of leadership and ministry for the betterment of the [...]

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    11. Not much to say about this. It's basically an extremely short introduction to the problem of Junia in Romans 16:7. It's a fascinating issue when it comes to both the trustworthiness of Bible translations and the debate regarding women in ministry. McKnight's treatment is far from comprehensive (or unbiased) but it's not a bad introduction and would be pretty accessible to laypeople. It also functions as a call to arms of sort to end the lack of focus on women in our studies of Scripture and Chri [...]

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    12. This is super short- less than an hour of reading- but provides a foundation as to who Junia was and her silencing, why she matters, and what it means to tell the stories of our grandmothers. Everyone should read this!

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    13. Spot on. I only wish he would expand this into a book.

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    14. Very short and basically argues that because Junia was an apostle, therefore women's ordination/equality/etc. Worth the 10 minutes it takes to read.

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    15. Not as substantive as I hoped, but worth the read.

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    16. In this book Scot McKnight tackles Romans 16:7, which is a fairly controversial verse in the whole women in church leadership debate. For those who recall, Romans 16:7 makes reference to an apostle named “Junia.” I put the name in quotes as the debate sounding this verse is limited to whether or not the Greek name is feminine (Junia) or masculine (Junias).The crazy thing is that while history is littered by writings on this verse, the hard fact remains that all of the Greek manuscripts we ha [...]

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    17. Excellent, but could use some editing. (For example, not everyone would know who Bruce Metzger is.)I am one of the odd people who does read footnotes (this is an issue that comes up in this slim volume, if an e-book can be called "slim"), but had paid attention to Junia in some translations being Junius in others. The description of her journey is worth the read.And I have to admit that I love the conclusion:Junia was a woman. Junia was an apostle. Junia was an outstanding apostle. And Junia is [...]

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    18. McKnight is a good writer, but I was expecting more from this book. It is a quick read, but I would describe it as mostly rhetoric and short on arguments. I couldn't help but feel while reading it that a good satire could be written entitled "Andronicus is Not Alone", which could match it point for point with the exception of the name shifting.Even the rhetoric was tiresome, though. We don't hear sermons about Junia or Phoebe for the same reason we don't hear sermons about Andronicus or Tychicus [...]

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    19. I found this essay disappointing. Much too short to be worth $2.99, and not really full of much useful information, either. A little too much time was spent dramatically re-iterating his point: "They killed Junia." "Junia was murdered." "Junia was buried alive." I I get it, thanks.A very brief run-down of the actual issue in question (Junia's name being masculinized in some biblical translations) is followed by a rather sappy and anecdotal portrayal of 3 other women through history who were cool [...]

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    20. Here McKnight tells the story of Junia. Although little is known about this Biblical figure, her story only begins with Paul's passing reference in his letter to the Romans (16:7). Centuries later (at least fourteen of them!), Junia became Junias (a masculine name), which seemed more appropriate in light of her designation as an apostle by Paul. Junia is silenced. Junia is not alone. Junia, argues McKnight, stands in a long line of women – in the Bible, in church history, and in ministry today [...]

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    21. Wow -- I was extremely hit by this short, concise, and powerful book. Junia is Not Alone will force you to grapple with the question of women in the church, scripture, etc. McKnight compellingly puts forward a narrative that invites and empowers all peoples to wrestle with the brokenness of half the world (ie women) left un-empowered. Due to the length of the book, he does not go into great depth with theological & historical questions, but does enough homework to get the reader asking good [...]

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    22. An impassioned plea for the church to recognize its past errors and celebrate the women past, present and future who play such a critical role in the furthering of the Gospel.The historical case of the erasing of Junia from the Bible is really just a jumping off point in this essay turned e-book. But is a story I was unaware of and I am sure a great many others are ignorant of the episode and its implications as well.A quirky story in many ways but an important subject and McKnight brings passio [...]

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    23. Gender bending textual criticism made Junia, the apostle mentioned by Paul in Romans 16, a man named Junias. There was not a single instance of the male name Junias in the ancient world. The sex change was because the Apostles were definitely not women.In this brief essay (27 pages) McKnight argues that not only was Junia a woman apostle, but she is one of many women in the Bible who exercise authority to teach, preach and prophesy. This book is too brief to convince the die-hard biblical comple [...]

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    24. The book focuses on the validity of the translation that renders Junia as a female apostle. The books on to trace how this was suppressed and how there are many other suppressed stories of women church leaders that need to be told. I thought his treatment of the other women were a bit scant. I wrote an extended blog post on the other women if anyone is interested. spencerboersma/2015/05/04/Admittedly, Scot McKnight is a much more flavorful writer than I am.

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    25. This was a quick read, but that doesn't mean its content is light or lacking depth. McKnight has given the church & its leadership a lot to think about and act upon in this booklet.It is well worth a half hour of your time. And will probably make you uncomfortable by the time your done.We must acknowledge & hear the voice of Junia.

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    26. Interesting read.This is an interesting short read about a woman leader in the New Testament church whom various translators chose to view as male because "maleness' fit better with their doctrinal beliefs. McKnight defends Junia's "femaleness" here in addition to reminding readers about other prominent women in the Bible and in church history.

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    27. Point well taken and defended. The implications of Junia being an early Apostle and a woman, are far reaching. The question of why Junia was translated later as a masculine, Junias, is something the whole church ought to come to terms with.

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    28. I wish this book was longer, but it serves as a nice, strong introduction to Junia and the topic of how women have been silenced so many times throughout history. And now I want to read pretty much everything he referenced or cited.

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    29. I would really love if this could be turned into a longer, more in depth discussion of Junia. However, it is a great introduction. Would be great to use in a gender role study at a church looking to become more gender inclusive.

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    30. This book shares stories that need to be heard: starting with the Bible and sweeping through some church history noting names and voices that need not be silenced. All are in Christ, including Junia and others like her.

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