Abraham, a play;

  • Title: Abraham, a play;
  • Author: Hrotsvitha
  • ISBN: 2940017642603
  • Page: 423
  • Format: Nook
  • Abraham a play None
    None

    • Free Read [Classics Book] ↠ Abraham, a play; - by Hrotsvitha Ý
      423 Hrotsvitha
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Classics Book] ↠ Abraham, a play; - by Hrotsvitha Ý
      Posted by:Hrotsvitha
      Published :2019-01-25T12:56:15+00:00

    About Hrotsvitha


    1. Hrotsvitha c 935 c 1002 , also known as Hroswitha, Hrotsvit, Hrosvit, and Roswitha, was a 10th century German secular canoness, as well as a dramatist and poet who lived and worked in Abbey of Gandersheim, in modern day Lower Saxony, a community of secular canonesses Her name, as she herself attests, is Saxon for strong voice She wrote in Latin, and is considered by some to be the first person since antiquity to compose drama in the Latin West.Hrotsvit was born into the German nobility and became a canoness at the Abbey of Gandersheim, located at Bad Gandersheim.Hrotsvit studied under Rikkardis and Gerberg, daughter of King Henry the Fowler Gerberg s brother, the Emperor Otto I, penned a history that became one of Hrotsvit s poetical subjects, in her Carmen de Gestis Oddonis Imperatoris, which encompasses the period up to the coronation of Emperor Otto I in 962.She was noted for her great learning and was introduced to Roman Writers by Gerberg Hrotsvit s work shows familiarity, not only with the Church fathers, but also with Classical poetry, including Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Plautus and Terence on whom her own verse was modelled Several of her plays draw on the so called apocryphal gospels Her works form part of the Ottonian Renaissance.


    849 Comments


    1. Well, this is what you get when you read a play written by a tenth-century Saxon nun who knew her play would never be performed. It's simple-minded, crude, it has almost no bearing on actual life in the world, and it's a little crazy. Now, while it's simple, admittedly it's not quite as simple as Woody Allen's hygiene play from Love and Death (which you can see here at around the 2:25 mark that's a play that's worth the 30 seconds it takes to watch). But it comes close.As a reading experience, i [...]

      Reply

    2. I feel like I can’t really properly rate this — and probably other upcoming medieval texts i’ll be reading — because I just know they’re not my thing. I’m reading them for class and otherwise I wouldn’t go near them. So while I don’t vehemently hate this, it was just a slightly boring and average reading experience, where I know i’ll get much more out of it once we discuss it in class.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *