Lights on the Nile

  • Title: Lights on the Nile
  • Author: Donna Jo Napoli
  • ISBN: 9780061667930
  • Page: 175
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Lights on the Nile Kepi is a young girl in ancient Egypt content to stay home with her family helping her father who was wounded in the construction of a pyramid for the cruel pharaoh Khufu But that was before she an
    Kepi is a young girl in ancient Egypt, content to stay home with her family, helping her father, who was wounded in the construction of a pyramid for the cruel pharaoh Khufu But that was before she and her pet baboon, Babu, were kidnapped and held captive on a boat bound for the capital city, Ineb Hedj And when Kepi and Babu are separated, she knows she has only one choiKepi is a young girl in ancient Egypt, content to stay home with her family, helping her father, who was wounded in the construction of a pyramid for the cruel pharaoh Khufu But that was before she and her pet baboon, Babu, were kidnapped and held captive on a boat bound for the capital city, Ineb Hedj And when Kepi and Babu are separated, she knows she has only one choice to make her way to the capital on her own, rescue Babu, and find a way to appeal to the pharaoh Khufu is rich and powerful, but Kepi has her own powers, deep inside her ones she herself doesn t even know about yet.Donna Jo Napoli, acclaimed author of Zel and Beast, revisits the fabled origin of fairies in this strikingly orig inal and affecting novel of friendship.

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      Posted by:Donna Jo Napoli
      Published :2019-07-22T02:22:12+00:00

    About Donna Jo Napoli


    1. Donna Jo Napoli is both a linguist and a writer of children s and YA fiction She loves to garden and bake bread, and even dreams of moving to the woods and becoming a naturalist At various times her house and yard have been filled with dogs, cats, birds, and rabbits For thirteen years she had a cat named Taxi, and liked to go outside and call, Taxi to make the neighbors wonder But dear dear Taxi died in 2009 She has five children, seven grandchildren, and currently lives outside Philadelphia She received her BA in mathematics in 1970 and her Ph.D in Romance Languages and Literatures in 1973, both from Harvard University, then did a postdoctoral year in Linguistics at MIT She has since taught linguistics at Smith College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Georgetown University, the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and Swarth College It was at UM that she earned tenure in 1981 and became a full professor in 1984 She has held visiting positions at the University of Queensland Australia , the University of Geneva Switzerland , Capital Normal University of Beijing China , the University of Newcastle UK , the University of Venice at Ca Foscari Italy , and the Siena School for the Liberal Arts Italy as well as lectured at the University of Sydney Australia , Macquarie University Australia , the University of the Witwatersrand South Africa , and the University of Stellenbosch South Africa and held a fellowship at Trinity College Dublin In the area of linguistics she has authored, coauthored, edited, or coedited 17 books, ranging from theoretical linguistics to practical matters in language structure and use, including matters of interest to d Deaf people She has held grants and fellowships from numerous sources, including the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mellon Foundation, the Sloan Foundation.


    997 Comments


    1. I loved this book when I was younger! And I mean LOVED it. It's such a great story, set in ancient Egypt and filled with magic and adventure. The ending always made me sad but at the same time happy, I had a lot of mixed feelings about it. Anyways, this book is super good and tells a very original and entertaining story.

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    2. I couldn't even finish this book. it just seemed to go on and on and I skipped to the end to find the child involved in the story becomes a magical fairy. I might not be giving credit to the story, but it just seemed to weird to finish. I liked the story though. I liked the description of the Nile and the wildlife and eveything seen through the eyes of a 10 year old girl who has been stolen. This is the second book I've read by this author and both were about stolen children. The first one took [...]

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    3. This was a pretty good historical fiction about a young girl in ancient Egypt. But then it got really fanciful at the end, which I wasn't expecting. Like, fairies fanciful. Kind of an odd way to wrap things up.

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    4. Ancient Egypt continues to hold great appeal for young and old, and even makes the best-seller lists (see Stacy Schiff's Cleopatra: A Life, for example). Award-winning author Donna Jo Napoli's newest book, suitable for elementary school readers, is set during that fascinating period, and tells the story of Kepi, a young girl living around 2530 BCE. Kepi's father, a laborer, has been wounded during the construction of a pyramid for Pharaoh Khufu. Kepi's life changes dramatically when she, along w [...]

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    5. Kepi's name means tempest. She does everything passionately and with the best intentions from rescuing Babu, the baby baboon to her journey up the river on a mission to help Babu and speak to the pharaoh on behalf of her father wounded working on the pyramids. At first her only friends are animals, but then it begins to seem that her prayers are being answered just not necessarily as she expected. She will make friends but this journey will end far from how she expected.About the cover: Kepi loo [...]

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    6. It’s probable that Donna Jo Napoli’s books first sparked my interest in historical fiction with “Beast” being the most memorable. I am always confident when picking up a book from this author that the material is well researched – yet still suspenseful and not bogged down by someone trying too hard to prove they are knowledgeable on the subject. It’s interesting as I haven’t read a book by her (or anyone) since before I had my daughter, who is now almost 18 months. My perspective a [...]

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    7. gr 4-8 267 pgsaround 2530 BC, Ancient Egypt. Her family is always warning Kepi to think before she acts, but Kepi just can't help herself. Because of her impulsiveness, Kepi ends up being kidnapped. At first, Kepi is desperate to return home. But then Kepi decides that once they reach Ineb Hedj, the capital, she might have an opportunity to do some good. Her father is unable to work since he was injured while helping to build the pharaoh's pyramid. Kepi is sure that if she can just talk to the p [...]

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    8. A story set in the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt, beginning quite strongly with the story of Kepi and her family, struggling since the accident that befell her father while working for the Pharaoh ferrying the granite blocks up the river for a new great pyramid. He cannot work, and decides that he will become a bread baker and experiment with new kinds of breads. He sends Kepi and her pet baby baboon out to gather herbs for the dough, but they are kidnapped because Babu is a valuable animal who w [...]

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    9. Kepi is a young Egyptian girl whose father was injured in the construction of the pyramids. Her father has plans to get their family back on track and she and her pet baboon Babu have a part in these plans. Unfortunately Babu is stolen and when Kepi goes after him, she too is kidnapped. When her and Babu are separated, she knows that she must go to the capital city to retrieve him and find a way to speak with the pharaoh about the injustice of what happens to those who get injured or killed work [...]

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    10. I enjoyed this book more than some of Napoli's other books but this one felt much too similar to North in terms of basic formatting. (Obviously, North was set in North America with a black boy bent on Arctic exploration and this book is set in ancient Africa with an Egyptian girl kidnapped by a man she thought her friend.) That being said, I have a fondness for Egyptian literature of this nature so that propped up my review a little bit. Napoli creates a solid, interesting narrative. However, so [...]

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    11. Lights on the Nile takes place in ancient Egypt and it's about a girl named Kepi who lives her life as a farmer.After her father loses his foot in a under a huge slab of limestone while helping to build a pyramid she vows to tell the pharaoh to treat his workers better. One day she gets kidnapped by a guy named Menes who takes her far away from her village to sell her and her baboon to a temple she sees her chance to talk to the pharaoh but during the trip there they abandon her in a village. No [...]

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    12. Kepi is a young girl in ancient Egypt, content to stay home with her family, helping her father, who was wounded in the construction of a pyramid for the cruel pharaoh Khufu. But that was before she and her pet baboon, Babu, were kidnapped and held captive on a boat bound for the capital city, Ineb Hedj. And when Kepi and Babu are separated, she knows she has only one choice: to make her way to the capital on her own, rescue Babu, and find a way to appeal to the pharaoh. Khufu is rich and powerf [...]

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    13. Kepi's father was maimed working on the pyramid, and now must somehow support their family without a leg. She is determined to talk to the Pharoah himself and see that justice is done. When her pet baby baboon is stolen, and the chase leads her far from home, her wish just may come true. She gets Babu (the baboon) back, but it doesn't help much, because then they are kidnapped together. Kepi journies to the capital city and ultimately to her destiny, as the Egyptian gods she has been praying to [...]

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    14. The author writes 240+ pages of realistic fiction concerning a young Egyptian girl's adventures during the era of the Pharaoh Khufu and the building of the Great Pyramid, some it gory, most of it immersed in the details of life over 4,500 years ago. Kepi rescues an orphaned baby baboon, loses him to thieves, sets out to retrieve him, is kidnapped to be sold into slavery, journeys to the greatest city in Egypt and protests the injustice of the Pharaoh's policies to his face. Then, out of the blue [...]

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    15. The historic info was interesting—I liked learning more of life in ancient Egypt—but the plot was not satisfying, the characters were not particularly compelling, and there were times that it felt like the author added scenes and settings just so that she could add in more cool info she learned in her research, not because it added to the story any. It's only a 275-page, MG book, and it took me a week to read it. I didn't feel any drive to see what happened next.

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    16. I enjoyed it as historical fiction set in ancient Egypt. Kepi finds a baby baboon and is training it to help her with her daily tasks. The baboon is kidnapped and she sets off after it. Then she is also kidnapped. She eventually escapes and meets up with some other orphan/slave children. I thought the end was weak, when instead of solving our problems in the real world, the author (spoiler alert) resorted to fairies.

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    17. Want to know what it might have been like to live in Egypt circa 2550 BCE, when the greatest pyramid was being built? Seen through the eyes of a young girl, Egypt is a place of alternating delights and despair. Fortunately, she has the strength of will to survive despite challenges, and there's a hugely satisfying twist at the end. Also nice to know that Rick Riordan is not the only writer who can make Egyptian gods and goddesses come alive!

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    18. I really enjoyed this book, it was full of surprises and daunting adventure. I especially love how the author, Donna Jo Napoli described the landscape so well, I really felt like I was there in Egypt, rowing in a small boat down the Nile with Kepi. I also love how she really portrays the protaganist's feelings really clearly, and I felt like I was with her, experiencing everything that Kepi was. Beautiful story, full of dynamic action. Strongly reccomend.

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    19. A strong start, an interesting (if disjointed) middle, but a weak end. This was definitely a low to middle grade story; if I had to guess I'd peg the appropriate readership age at 3-5th grade. I really appreciated the authenticity of the ancient Egyptian setting, and Kepi is a strong character. I just wish that the story had ended otherwise, I guess.

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    20. I really had to push through this book. It lost steam for me, but I did care about the character and wanted to see her safely home. I agree with other reviewers that the feri-element kind of comes out of nowhere. Parts were enjoyable though and it was well-researched.

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    21. An enjoyable read, though the fantasy element felt tacked on to the last couple of chapters, and it was somewhat of a jarring transition, with the rest of the book having been essentially written as straight-ahead historical fiction. Good, but I wouldn't count it among Napoli's best.

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    22. My 10 yo was frightened by this book. It wasn't super graphic, but there were a lot of scary things and she had nightmares. I read it as well and I'll just say that the book jacket implies this is a pretty kid friendly story and in reality it's not as gentle as the book jacket implies.

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    23. Really more of a 2.5. Napoli is one of my favorite YA authors, and I usually love her "retellings" of legends and fairytales, but this one reaaaally didn't do it for me. The "fantasy" part didn't come in until the last five pages or so, and everything before that was, honestly, kind of boring.

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    24. I'm giving this one three stars because, up until the very end, I was enjoying the book. Without going into detail to avoid spoilers, the ending almost came out of nowhere; not the direction the book felt like it was heading in. However, until the end, I enjoyed the storyline.

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    25. This book is a very full of suspense . Kepi and her three friends end up as fairies for the Egyptian goddess Hathor . While in the mean time her parents and sister are becoming wealthier by selling and trading herb bread for items , or in exchange for the trader working their land for them.

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    26. I really did not like this book. It did not fit my style of reading and yeah. It's a good book in the beginning but then I lost interest in the boook so I stoped reading it and started Mocking Jay by Suzanne Collins.

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    27. Napoli's strength is depicting life in other cultures in a historical setting and bringing fairy tales to life in new stories. Here she tells a story of early Egypt and the creating of fairies. It is a good talke of friendship for the middle grades. Gr. 3-5.

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    28. It read like 5 (give or take) different books all rolled into one. Very hard for me to follow.

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    29. Read Mecheles review here:readforyourfuture

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