Az utolsó farkas

  • Title: Az utolsó farkas
  • Author: László Krasznahorkai
  • ISBN: 9789631427455
  • Page: 146
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Az utols farkas Egyetlen t k letes rendszer gy ny r mondat amelyb l megr z er vel s sz ps ggel bontakozik ki a kor szelleme az emberi mag ny s egy dr mai t rt net ez az sszet veszthetetlen Krasznahorkai elbesz
    Egyetlen, t k letes rendszer , gy ny r mondat, amelyb l megr z er vel s sz ps ggel bontakozik ki a kor szelleme, az emberi mag ny s egy dr mai t rt net ez az sszet veszthetetlen ,,Krasznahorkai elbesz l s A kort rs magyar irodalom egyik kiemelked alakj nak remekm ve, kit n aj nd kk nyv a szerz s az irodalom rajong inak.

    • Best Read [László Krasznahorkai] ✓ Az utolsó farkas || [Historical Fiction Book] PDF í
      146 László Krasznahorkai
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [László Krasznahorkai] ✓ Az utolsó farkas || [Historical Fiction Book] PDF í
      Posted by:László Krasznahorkai
      Published :2019-07-02T01:42:44+00:00

    About László Krasznahorkai


    1. L szl Krasznahorkai is the difficult, peculiar, obsessive, visionary Hungarian author of eight novels.He is probably best known through the oeuvre of the director B la Tarr, who has collaborated with him on several movies He is also the 2015 Man Booker International Prize Winner.


    447 Comments


    1. A small beautiful hardback stocking-stuffer received for Xmas per a not very long list of international literature in translation I sent to Santa Claus c/o my Mom. A great description of a pit filled with carrion. Creepy, atmospheric, flowing, makes me want to re-read The Hound of the Baskervilles for the first time in ~30 years -- these three stories interlink, or I should say that 'The Last Wolf" seems to inexplicitly interlink with the two "Herman" stories that explicitly interlink. Trapping, [...]

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    2. "the love of animals is the one true love in which one is never disappointed"imagine if lászló krasznahorkai wrote a single novella-length sentence about a failed, depressed philosophy professor who spends one morning in a german bar recounting the story, to one demonstrably uninterested barkeep, of his trip to spain, the result of an invitation to write a "new chapter" about the extremadura region, which, instead, turns into a compulsion to track down and discover the facts behind the death o [...]

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    3. A small book, containing three excellent short stories. Its brevity - and that it feels more like a sampler for ND's upcoming translation of Relations of Grace (which contains at least one of these stories: Herman) - is the main reason I only gave it four stars. This is top-notch Krasznahorkai, in a handsome little (it's quite undersized) hardcover. I just wish there was more is all; it's pricey for the little you get.

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    4. Two excellent novellas about hunting, vanishing crafts, shifting ethics, and species extinction linked by haunting thematic echoes. "The Last Wolf," a single sentence account of a trip to the Spanish hinterlands that's surprisingly addictive, is especially impressive. I'd wager this slim volume is a good introduction to Krasznahorkai. Beautifully designed, too. 4.5 stars

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    5. The Last Wolf & Herman combines into one English book two linked stories, Herman, A vador, and A mesterségnek vége (Herman - The Game Warden and The Death of a Craft), taken from the 1986 story collection Kegyelmi viszonyok (Relations of Grace) and translated by John Batki, and the story "Az utolsó farkas" (The Last Wolf) from 2009 and translated by George Szirtes. [The dust jacket describes them as novellas, but that is generous when the whole book amounts to only 120 well spaced out pag [...]

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    6. Laszlo Krasznahotkai is an artist. The book provoked me, made me uncomfortable at times, made me laugh at others, but most rewardingly, added ways of thinking. He accomplishes this through unusual characters and, in The Last Wolf, his technique. The book in English is a cool presentation in that the first two stories, Herman, and The Death of a Craft, conclude and then you flip the book over and read The Wolf. The first two stories feature a game warden eradicating "noxious beasts" from a small [...]

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    7. A Story Diminished by Lack of Ambition, Energy, or Commitment"The Last Wolf" is a novella, 76 pages in translation, written in what is usually described as one of Krasznahorkai's characteristic long sentences. Technically, that isn't right, because the novella is actually a string of run-on sentences, with ordinary sentences embedded in them. Grammatically correct long sentences are rare in fiction. (See the remarks on Enard's "The Zone.") This form is looser and, I think, less interesting than [...]

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    8. Note: The Petofi Literary Museum host a lots of full, freebooks - even contemporary ones (though in hungarian of course)! I'veread this book from here and there is much more there. The link is:pim/object.90867f8f-d45Thank you pim!Review:Incredibly, since I've learned hungarian it took only 21 short yearsfor me to read a first hungarian book (that is voluntarily, cover tocover). I've googled for contemporary hungarian writers andKrasznahorkai was one of the first matches. In addition it turned ou [...]

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    9. I love long sentences so part of me was primed to love this kind of thing. Both novellas are pretty different, offering very different experiences, but also working together in an interesting way. But, yeah, really more for those interested in style. The Last Wolf is a 70 page sentence, which is full of self-loathing and digressions, and an interesting story about a man who hunted wolves. Herman is a bit stranger and darker, about a man inflicting random violence upon a small town. Good stuff. I [...]

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    10. Nice writing exercise

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    11. man reaches in the dark for god, finds an animal instead

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    12. Excellent stuff: Herman is a memorable narrative, The Last Wolf is a memorable sentence. Can't ask for much more, especially with the cute design.

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    13. Three tales – one a single 70-page sentence, an extended breath that leaps from embittered melancholy to comic travelogue and an unexpected epiphany of grief. I've had a couple novels by Krasznahorkai tucked away for years, unread. This I picked up for its clever cover and format (once you've read the first story, you have to flip the book over to read the other two). From the first page I was afraid I was reading Thomas Bernhard, but on a foggy Sunday night in San Francisco how I could resist [...]

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    14. So far, I have found every Krasznahorkai work I've read to be fascinating, though not necessarily enjoyable. The Last Wolf & Herman are no exceptions to this, despite being quite short. Make no mistake, though the New Directions edition is over a hundred pages, that's thanks to small pages and wide margins, so in truth there are perhaps only about fifty regular pages-worth of content here. Of those fifty pages, more than half are taken up by The Last Wolf, a story that consists of a single s [...]

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    15. What a wonderful place to start for non converts to Krasznahorkai, although the two (Herman is split into two takes) stories 'The Last Wolf' & 'Herman' were originally published 23 years apart!!!Fans will love to dip into his world again, newbies can get a taste before they'll be hooked.

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    16. This is actually the first book I've read by Krasznahorkai, and it certainly won't be the last. 70 page sentences might be challenging but they're well worth the effort. One of the masters of world literature.

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    17. This short work packs a hell of a punch. Exceptional work! Word of warning: don't read if you don't like reading about bad things being done to animals!!!

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    18. A strange triptych of novellas. One about an obscure academic investigating the demise of the last wolf of the Spanish region of Extremadura; one about a game warden who experiences an existential crisis and starts using his traps to hurt people rather than animals; one about a group of decadent thrillseekers who happen to find themselves in the same town where the game warden is setting up his traps, and, in between orgies, decide to help the locals fight off this strange threat. The first nove [...]

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    19. Herman: 5Last Wolf: 4 (actually kind of liked the one sentence gimmick)Craft: 3

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    20. I was first introduced to László on the recommendation of my professor through a single chapter in his book Seibo There Below in which he describes the Alhambra (Al-Ḥamrā) in Granada, Spain. I was infatuated. He describes so effortlessly what I always found an impossible endeavour; to somehow embody that peculiar experience of that Palace in Andalucía, an inevitably futile task that only one who has seen it with his or her own eyes would comprehend the immensity of.After reading that I fou [...]

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    21. This small book consists of three short stories. Two of them are alternative accounts of the story of Herman, a gamekeeper beset with guilt over the number of animals that he has killed, and the extreme actions he takes as a result. The first of them. "The Game Warden", is quite good, but the second, "The Death of a Craft", is pretty silly and poorly resolved.The main story is "The Last Wolf", wherein a minor academic regales a bored and testy Hungarian barman with a long and convoluted tale abo [...]

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    22. Beautiful creative writing

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    23. A very satisfyingly complex pair of stories with great perspectival texture.

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    24. Cijeli romančić, jedna rečenica. Jako šarmantno.

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    25. In this slim, beautifully bound book Krasznahorkai gives us 3 different points of view on the death of the last wolf, hunted and killed in Estramedura, Spain. In one a failed academic bores a bartender with how he was called in to research the region, all expenses paid with doting staff assigned to assist him, in the midst of his own personal collapse after confronting his own crippling futility. In another, a seasoned trapper, tasked with killing all the wolves on a hunting estate turns his ski [...]

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    26. เรื่องสั้นขนาดยาวสองเรื่องที่มีแก่นเกี่ยวกับคน vs ธรรมชาติ โดยที่เรื่องหนึ่งพูดถึงความตายของหมาป่าตัวสุดท้ายของดินแดน ขณะที่อีกเรื่องพูดถึงพรานเฒ่าที่ต้องล่าสัตว์ตามคำสั่ [...]

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    27. This is a quietly profound gem of a book. Two tales, one of which is told twice from differing perspectives. They are set up so that after reading one, the reader must flip the book over and read the second story starting at the opposite end of the physical book. Juxtaposition with intention? The first tale, "The Last Wolf" is about a writer on a mysterious assignment and the baffling path he follows to meet his employers' expectations. He is faced with the existential dilemma of extinction, of [...]

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    28. Krasznahorkai has often been described as hypnotic and a 70 page long sentence will do that to you, but he's also troubling, haunting and melancholic.He writes with a sense that something has gone wrong or something was always wrong. A fear that a mistake of some kind has been made or somehow is built into existence. What anyone can do about it he never suggests but the protagonist in 'The Last Wolf' sits in a bar alone with his anxiety and having given up thinking tells a story to a barman who [...]

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    29. The Last Wolf (being the first in a series of 2 stories related in theme) is one delicious run-on sentance, bringing to mind Joyce's playfulness and way better than Enard's attempt, dazzling and breathless and having plenty of that Krasznahorkain black humour.Herman I and II, being the second in the two stories in The Last Wolf, is itself two stories obliquely related. I just wish there was more.Sitting, waiting, eagerly, for the next Krasznahorkai.

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    30. Picked this up at Ravenna Third Place Books at their recommendation and so glad I did. The Last Wolf is incessant and breathless (as you'd expect for a story told in a single sentence), and somehow both unnerving and deeply sad and affecting. Herman (The Game Warden; The Death of a Craft) isdreamlike? And strange, and quite visceral. Both stories are something you simply have to experience for yourself.

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