Dialogues and Letters (Ad Helviam matrem De consolatione, De Brevitate Vitæ, De Tranquillitate Animi, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium)

  • Title: Dialogues and Letters (Ad Helviam matrem De consolatione, De Brevitate Vitæ, De Tranquillitate Animi, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium)
  • Author: Seneca Charles Desmond Nuttall Costa
  • ISBN: 9780140446791
  • Page: 351
  • Format: Paperback
  • Dialogues and Letters Ad Helviam matrem De consolatione De Brevitate Vit De Tranquillitate Animi Epistulae morales ad Lucilium A major writer and a leading figure in the public life of Rome Seneca c BC AD ranks among the most eloquent and influential masters of Latin prose This selection explores his thoughts on philosop
    A major writer and a leading figure in the public life of Rome, Seneca c 4BC AD 65 ranks among the most eloquent and influential masters of Latin prose This selection explores his thoughts on philosophy and the trials of life In the Consolation to Helvia he strives to offer solace to his mother, following his exile in AD 41, while On the Shortness of Life and On TranqA major writer and a leading figure in the public life of Rome, Seneca c 4BC AD 65 ranks among the most eloquent and influential masters of Latin prose This selection explores his thoughts on philosophy and the trials of life In the Consolation to Helvia he strives to offer solace to his mother, following his exile in AD 41, while On the Shortness of Life and On Tranquillity of Mind are lucid and compelling explorations of Stoic thought Witty and self critical, the Letters written to his young friend Lucilius explore Seneca s struggle to acquire philosophical wisdom A fascinating insight into one of the greatest minds of Ancient Rome, these works inspired writers and thinkers including Montaigne, Rousseau, and Bacon, and continue to intrigue and enlighten.

    • Best Read [Seneca Charles Desmond Nuttall Costa] ☆ Dialogues and Letters (Ad Helviam matrem De consolatione, De Brevitate Vitæ, De Tranquillitate Animi, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium) || [Travel Book] PDF ✓
      351 Seneca Charles Desmond Nuttall Costa
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Seneca Charles Desmond Nuttall Costa] ☆ Dialogues and Letters (Ad Helviam matrem De consolatione, De Brevitate Vitæ, De Tranquillitate Animi, Epistulae morales ad Lucilium) || [Travel Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Seneca Charles Desmond Nuttall Costa
      Published :2019-09-23T06:12:29+00:00

    About Seneca Charles Desmond Nuttall Costa


    1. Lucius Annaeus Seneca often known simply as Seneca ca 4 BC 65 AD was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, and in one work humorist, of the Silver Age of Latin literature He was tutor and later advisor to emperor Nero While he was later forced to commit suicide for alleged complicity in the Pisonian conspiracy to assassinate Nero, the last of the Julio Claudian emperors, he may have been innocent.


    931 Comments


    1. These are philosophical essays that reconcile one to life in a chauvinistic, racist, sexist, imperialist, jingoist, anti-intellectual, metaphysically capitalist society like the one we in the U.S. have to put up with. To the degree that these give comfort, I think they are worthwhile, especially for those who wish to get involved in networking, organizing and alternative institution-building because that is work desperately needed right now and with it comes many emotional and spiritual adversit [...]

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    2. Some treastises, some letters. . . reflections on life, and philosophy. Also views of ancient Roman life. It's interesting to read an account of a philosopher who scorns to look for a runaway slave on the grounds that if the slave can live without him, it's disgraceful that he can't live without the slave.

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    3. Lucius Annaeus Seneca was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, contemporary of Jesus, and the original antifragilist (see also: Nassim Nicholas Taleb's Antifragile).Dialogues and Letters collects "On the Shortness of Life," "On Tranquility of Mind," and extracts from "Natural Questions," and it served as my introduction to a mind that I'll probably continue to study for the duration of my days.Although no English translation of Seneca's writings holds a candle to the University of Ch [...]

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    4. Care to read the thoughts of a man chosen to tutor an emperor? Seneca the Younger lived in the opening century of the Roman Empire, and was such an accomplished author that even the early Roman Church tried to claim him. I've previously read a collection of his letters (Letters from a Stoic), part of an exchange between Seneca and his friend Lucilius, but Analogs and Essays is far more sharply focused. The theme of the letters ran toward the general; here, Seneca writes on particular topics, beg [...]

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    5. I have read Meditations and The art of Living. Both of them I enjoyed more than these books/letters. I simply found that there was too long between those truly inspiring and timeless guidings, which Meditations was full of.The last book is still unread, but I needed a break from this kind of reading.

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    6. Stoic thought in the format of dialogues to mother and some friends & letters recording travels and advice. Liked the dialogue with Serenus on tranquility of mind which deals with questions of moral purpose. Good intro to stoicism via this Roman statesman. Hope to keep reading this genre more with time.

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    7. Good introduction to Seneca but I think his "Letters from a Stoic" or Marcus Aurelius' Meditations would be better first choices to Stoicism. Also, this book has such a density of thought to it that multiple readings are required for even moderate understanding of his messages.

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    8. This book did not meet my expectations, but party it is my fault. I should have gone for Letter to a Stoic, by the same author as I was more interested in Seneca's philosophical thought and not his literature. Obviously, I did find some his philosophy but maybe not at the extend I had expected it.

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    9. An excellent collection of works of Lucius Annaeus Seneca. Politician, Lawyer, philosopher, and tutor to the man who would become the emperor Nero.A must read author!

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    10. Bilingual edition preferred.

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    11. “By the toil of others we are led into the presence of things which have been brought from darkness into light. We are excluded from no age, but we have access to them all; and if we are prepared in loftiness of mind to pass beyond the narrow confines of human weakness, there is a long period of time through which we can roam.”

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    12. Excellent. surprisingly easy read. Reminds me of Emerson.

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    13. If nothing else, Seneca is a wonderfully opinionated man. He is really quite quotable, and many of his ideas smack of truth. I most enjoyed 'On Tranquility of Mind' to his friend Serenus. I did like the letter to his mother, and I agree with a lot of his opinions, but I was irritated a little too often by the blatant sexism. I know that's what it was like back then and in that country, but I'm still entitled to my reaction. It shocks me how little people's basic natures have changed between now [...]

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    14. While the material in this compilation tends to be a bit repetitive, there are still useful nuggets of wisdom scattered throughout. The dialogues 'On Tranquility of Mind' and 'On the Shortness of Life' were definitely the highlights, and if I re-read in the future I will likely skip the letters altogether (they're quick, but don't add much that isn't covered in the dialogues).

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    15. A fascinating look into the turbulent world and incisive mind of one of ancient Rome's great thinkers and statesmen.

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